Shooting subjects with harsh background light...


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AlvinOMG

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Jan 2, 2010
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#1
As title.
Was wondering what settings i can use in order to get both subject and background in the correct exposure as bumping up the shutter speed or increasing the f-number will often overexpose the background.

Is there a way?

Pardon me if this question is too easy to be answered...:sweat:
 

Octarine

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Jan 3, 2008
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Pasir Ris
#2
There is no setting because the dynamic range of the sensor is not wide enough. Reduce the dynamic range of the scene. Possible ways: fill-in flash, reflectors, zoom in to cut off / minimize bright background areas.
 

pinholecam

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Jul 23, 2007
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#4
Expose for background and use a fill in flash
 

Dream Merchant

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Jan 11, 2007
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#5
Wait till the light in both background and foreground the same, move around till it is similar, or use any of the abovementioned techniques.
 

ZerocoolAstra

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Mar 13, 2008
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#7
As title.
Was wondering what settings i can use in order to get both subject and background in the correct exposure as bumping up the shutter speed or increasing the f-number will often overexpose the background.

Is there a way?

Pardon me if this question is too easy to be answered...:sweat:
Sad to say... the camera can't capture exactly what the eyes can see.
This is the "dynamic range" that everyone is talking about. Google for more info.
You have to do something to overcome this, and not fiddle with the settings, coz there ain't any magic setting. Fill flash seems to be the preferred method. I agree with that too.
 

Numnumball

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Mar 6, 2009
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#8
Expose for background and use a fill in flash
Thats what most ppl will do, dial down ur FEV (depending on the lighting conditions, it can range from -1 to -2EV) for a more natural looking flash (metering correcting for ambient light is key) just to lift shadows, fill light and reduce constrast.
 

lkkang

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Jan 6, 2007
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#9
ignore the metering of the background, let it be WHITE.
meter the subject face, fire the shot.
 

AlvinOMG

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Jan 2, 2010
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#10
Wait till the light in both background and foreground the same, move around till it is similar, or use any of the abovementioned techniques.
May i know what do you mean by "wait till the light in both background a foreground the same" ?

@Others.
Thanks guys for your valuable inputs :)
looks like using a flash is a must lol
 

Dream Merchant

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#12
May i know what do you mean by "wait till the light in both background a foreground the same" ?

@Others.
Thanks guys for your valuable inputs :)
looks like using a flash is a must lol
Sure - wait for lighting conditions to change such that you don't have to face such wide extremes in lighting.

Pick up any book on the basics of LIGHT (in photography) at the library and the basics of EXPOSURE. These two basic topics are absolutely CRUCIAL in conventional photography as we know it.

CHEERS!
 

night86mare

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Aug 25, 2006
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#13
As title.
Was wondering what settings i can use in order to get both subject and background in the correct exposure as bumping up the shutter speed or increasing the f-number will often overexpose the background.

Is there a way?

Pardon me if this question is too easy to be answered...:sweat:
fill flash

turn subject the other way so that they will have the light on them instead
 

ZerocoolAstra

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2008
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#14
yeah.... agreed.
TS, is there any compelling reason why you want your subjects with back to the light source (sun) ?
Even if you take at 90degrees to the light, it's much better.
 

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