Sherena @ Emerald Hill


ptan218

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Sep 14, 2009
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Some of my shots on Sherena. C&C are welcome. :thumbsup:

#1.


#2.


#3.


#4.
 

ptan218

Member
Sep 14, 2009
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#5.


#6.
 

Zahne

New Member
Aug 19, 2009
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Jurong East
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Erm.. The color for all is very warm, the last two realli too dark liao. It will be good if u can adjust to cooler color and increase the exposure like #3 or #4.
 

ptan218

Member
Sep 14, 2009
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Erm.. The color for all is very warm, the last two realli too dark liao. It will be good if u can adjust to cooler color and increase the exposure like #3 or #4.

Strange though, the exposure looks ok on my monitor... :think: Is there something that I need to do to calibrate my mon?
 

candleghost

Senior Member
Dec 6, 2007
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Strange though, the exposure looks ok on my monitor... :think: Is there something that I need to do to calibrate my mon?
bro, check and see what other ppl de photo exposure appear to u, are theirs ok?
 

Zahne

New Member
Aug 19, 2009
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Strange though, the exposure looks ok on my monitor... :think: Is there something that I need to do to calibrate my mon?
U can compare with ya #4 and #6, the exposure is realli far apart, if u say ya exposure for #6 is ok, then #4 is overexpose liao XD
 

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ptan218

Member
Sep 14, 2009
106
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U can compare with ya #4 and #6, the exposure is realli far apart, if u say ya exposure for #6 is ok, then #4 is overexpose liao XD
Oh ya, I agreed that #6 is underexposed. :cool: but I can't seem to do much adjustment to it as the built-in flash that bounce from the background will be overly bright if I increase the exposure.

BTW, I have just checked the color profile of my monitor, it is set to iMac. Should I use Adobe RGB color profile instead? Or it just doesn't matter? :think:

Thanks for your advice. :thumbsup:
 

pokiemon

Senior Member
Mar 5, 2005
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to me it's matter of preference - whether you like it warm or cool. there is no right or wrong.

however i find the poses very normal. also you may want to watch your crop. give your subject some room to breathe.

#6 is underexposed - to correct it, increase the curves in photoshop.
 

Zahne

New Member
Aug 19, 2009
798
2
0
36
Jurong East
www.flickr.com
Oh ya, I agreed that #6 is underexposed. :cool: but I can't seem to do much adjustment to it as the built-in flash that bounce from the background will be overly bright if I increase the exposure.

BTW, I have just checked the color profile of my monitor, it is set to iMac. Should I use Adobe RGB color profile instead? Or it just doesn't matter? :think:

Thanks for your advice. :thumbsup:
If u cannot adjust in a situation like this, you can always adjust it in ya imac, take in raw and do post process at home :) Hmmm I'm using standard profile for my mac.
 

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ptan218

Member
Sep 14, 2009
106
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to me it's matter of preference - whether you like it warm or cool. there is no right or wrong.

however i find the poses very normal. also you may want to watch your crop. give your subject some room to breathe.

#6 is underexposed - to correct it, increase the curves in photoshop.
Thanks for your advice. Here's the re-adjusted photo.

 

ptan218

Member
Sep 14, 2009
106
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If u cannot adjust in a situation like this, you can always adjust it in ya imac, take in raw and do post process at home :) Hmmm I'm using standard profile for my mac.
Actually I find that post processing takes a lot of time... me kinda lazy... :bsmilie:
 

pokiemon

Senior Member
Mar 5, 2005
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Oh ya, I agreed that #6 is underexposed. :cool: but I can't seem to do much adjustment to it as the built-in flash that bounce from the background will be overly bright if I increase the exposure.
i dont understand. it's a paid shoot. you are the photographer. you are the director. you determine where you stand and where the model stands.

solutions:

1. if standing from the front causes reflection on the doors, shift to the left or right side of the model and shoot from that position to soften the effect.

2. alternatively, soften your flash using tissue paper.

3. try taking without flash! increase the iso or open up the aperture if necessary and adjust the color correction on photoshop.

:dunno:
 

ptan218

Member
Sep 14, 2009
106
0
16
i dont understand. it's a paid shoot. you are the photographer. you are the director. you determine where you stand and where the model stands.

solutions:

1. if standing from the front causes reflection on the doors, shift to the left or right side of the model and shoot from that position to soften the effect.

2. alternatively, soften your flash using tissue paper.

3. try taking without flash! increase the iso or open up the aperture if necessary and adjust the color correction on photoshop.

:dunno:
Valuable lessons. :thumbsup: Thanks. :)
 

pokiemon

Senior Member
Mar 5, 2005
2,035
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Valuable lessons. :thumbsup: Thanks. :)
the best time to learn is at the shoot itself.

tell the organiser you are still learning and ask him for advice i.e. help to direct the model and ask him for comments on your picture and how to correct it.

i have been to shoots where the organiser helps the participants by giving feedback and share pointers.
 

Limsgp

New Member
Dec 16, 2005
1,115
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Singapore, Bedok
For situations like this (or mirror like BG), it's better not to use built-in flash due to the reflections.. unless you have a large diffuser..

Alternatively, you can stand at a different angle, say, 45° to the "wall" so that there will not be direct reflected flash. Due to the uneven surface, there'll still be some reflections, this is inevitable, but it might be more pleasing.

Or you can ask the model to stand further away from the wall.

So that the illumination on the model > illumination on the BG. If the BG is double the distance of the model to flash, the intensity will be 1/4 less. Quite a good bargain.. ;)


Oh ya, I agreed that #6 is underexposed. :cool: but I can't seem to do much adjustment to it as the built-in flash that bounce from the background will be overly bright if I increase the exposure.
 

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ptan218

Member
Sep 14, 2009
106
0
16
the best time to learn is at the shoot itself.

tell the organiser you are still learning and ask him for advice i.e. help to direct the model and ask him for comments on your picture and how to correct it.

i have been to shoots where the organiser helps the participants by giving feedback and share pointers.
This was a big group and it's not easy to seek opinion. But it's a lesson learnt, with all the advices from the forumers here I will try and work on my weaknesses. :)
 

ptan218

Member
Sep 14, 2009
106
0
16
For situations like this (or mirror like BG), it's better not to use built-in flash due to the reflections.. unless you have a large diffuser..

Alternatively, you can stand at a different angle, say, 45° to the "wall" so that there will not be direct reflected flash. Due to the uneven surface, there'll still be some reflections, this is inevitable, but it might be more pleasing.

Or you can ask the model to stand further away from the wall.

So that the illumination on the model > illumination on the BG. If the BG is double the distance of the model to flash, the intensity will be 1/4 less. Quite a good bargain.. ;)
I thought of shooting at an angle but that's not the result that I have wanted. I will invest in a good external flash before my next shoot. :D thanks.