Shadow problem with indoor macro photograhy


Jun 8, 2009
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#1
Hi all,

I'm a newbie to SLR. Just gotten my D90 + 18-105mm kits 6months back
I kept having this problem of having semi-circle shadow casted on my object due to the long lens.
Would getting a SB-800 help ?

 

Diavonex

Senior Member
Sep 23, 2008
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Admiralty
#2
Stand further away from subject to reduce the effect.
 

Jun 8, 2009
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#3
i tried that before and it worked of course. but it sacrificed the amount of detail i could capture therefore this is the reason why i'm so close to the object.
 

daredevil123

Moderator
Staff member
Oct 25, 2005
21,657
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lil red dot
#4
i tried that before and it worked of course. but it sacrificed the amount of detail i could capture therefore this is the reason why i'm so close to the object.
Step 1: Try a flash gun like SB600 or SB900.

Step 2: Try a diffuser

Step3: Use a off camera flash with a diffuser.
 

zac08

Senior Member
Feb 21, 2005
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East
#5
1. Remove the lens hood.
2. Use an external flash.
 

Jacobs

Senior Member
Sep 7, 2005
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Somewhere @ East Area
#6
The on-camera flash (pop-up flash) will provide direct lighting for the subject. The diffuser will provide somewhat indirect lighting. A reflective enclosure will provide indirect lighting. It's important to have the subject lit evenly (as possible) from all sides. This helps to reduce hot-spots and harsh shadows.
 

#7
Macro with the pop up with a long macro lens do not work well together. Even with a diffuser you'll get that shadow at the bottom of the image. Recommend getting an external flash if you're serious about macro.
 

Jun 8, 2009
25
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#8
Thank you all for the valuable feedback and coaching.
I'm thinking of getting a external flash actually. But which would be better? SB-800 good?
 

zac08

Senior Member
Feb 21, 2005
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#9
Thank you all for the valuable feedback and coaching.
I'm thinking of getting a external flash actually. But which would be better? SB-800 good?
Yes, SB-800 or SB-900 allows a negative angle for you to aim the flash downwards. :)
 

Jun 8, 2009
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#10
how bout SB-600 compared to SB-800 to nissin622? which would be a better buy? requirement is to be able to use as an external flash gun for macro photography. i've read reviews but really noob to the TTL etc terms
 

ZerocoolAstra

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2008
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rainy Singapore
#12
Any suggestion on the above?
SB600 definitely has enough power for near work, that's for sure.
If you mount it on the hotshoe, you may not be able to tilt it down enough, as it only goes parallel with lens at most. As zac08 mentioned, SB800 and Sb900 allow tilting to a negative angle.
 

ZerocoolAstra

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2008
9,522
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rainy Singapore
#13
Can use SB600 remotely with pop-up as commander.
But holding it all might be a handful! :) Perhaps a flash bracket...?

And also a dedicated macro lens :devil:
 

Jun 8, 2009
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#14
how bout SB-600 compared to SB-800 to nissin622? which would be a better buy? requirement is to be able to use as an external flash gun for macro photography. i've read reviews but really noob to the TTL etc terms

any solutions on above? price aside... i mean as in SB600 compared against nissin622.
or rather nissin622 is comparable to which nikon flash in terms of functions
 

zac08

Senior Member
Feb 21, 2005
11,755
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East
#15
any solutions on above? price aside... i mean as in SB600 compared against nissin622.
or rather nissin622 is comparable to which nikon flash in terms of functions
Forget about third party ones, stick to Nikon for best compatibility and functionability.
 

#16
any solutions on above? price aside... i mean as in SB600 compared against nissin622.
or rather nissin622 is comparable to which nikon flash in terms of functions
If price is not an issue, I agree to forget about 3rd party flashes. You'll be much happier with Nikon.
 

dykat2009

Senior Member
Jul 6, 2009
2,577
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Jurong West St65
#17
Any suggestion on the above?
Place the DIY diffuser (a rectangular piece) for your pop up flash right at front end of the lens and standing up. cut the bottom to fit into curve of lens, punch 2 holes, use rubberband to hold under the lens

Suggested DIY diffuser material can be plastic foam plate, milk bottle container (Meiji)


Alternatively, get a bracket that allows to mount the external flash (connected via TTL cable to hotshoe) near to the front end of lens (macro or normal) near the subject. Still need a DIY diffuser and this setup will be heavier to handheld.
 

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