Seeking advise for Wedding accessories (Please help urgent)


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nikor_d

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Hi Lads,very sorry for the last minute rush.I'm using nikon D70 which I bought about a month ago.A friend of mine is getting married in two weeks time for some reasons he wants me to be the photographer.I tought it will be a good start for me as well.I really want to help him but at the same time I also have budget constrains.

Lads,I would really appreciate if anyone of you out there can help me.I need to know what are the accessories that I required to shoot for weddings.eg what type of lens,flash and etc.

Currently I have 1 lens(18mm- 70mm),1 polorising filter,1 UV lens,tripod and 1 CF 256 card.Seeking help and advise from you. :confused:
 

Adiemus

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May 21, 2004
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I'm no expert.

I think your kit lens should do the job, since you are under budget constraints. I would think that you would need a decent flash though.

Something that work work well with your D70 (i.e. iTTL, if you need it), would be a Nikon SB600 ($360+)(no bounce card) or a Nikon SB800 ($630+)(comes wtih omnibounce and bounce card). The older Nikon Flashes can also be used, but you would have to use "A" mode or "M" mode.

You shouldn't need the polarizer unless you are shooting outdoor shots under direct sunlight. Tripod may not be necessary.

Your 256Mb CF Card is NOT ENOUGH!! You'll need at least another piece of 512Mb or 256Mb. Let me qualify 1st.... I assume you are shooting in RAW.

Even if you have another piece of CF card, you'll need to store the pictures somewhere and then clear your cards in order to take pictures again. ;)
I've PMed you regarding this. ;)

Most importantly, check out those wedding photos that the pros take and try to remember the poses or the kinds of shots taken. It may help you in getting the couple to pose or for yourself to "find" these shots on that day.

Lastly, shoot a lot of pictures, so that you'll have a lot to choose from. :)

My 1.5cts worth...
 

thoa_rs

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You'll probably want to have a 60 F2.8 micro to cover the closeups and available light scenarios. You'll also need a flash like the SB600 or SB800. Not to forget at least 512mb more of memory.
 

finkster

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I assume this would be your first wedding shoot?

First and foremost, you need to realise the awesome responsibility of being the primary photographer for a wedding. Unless your friend is perfectly aware of your inexperience and is willing to take the risk, or if you are the backup photographer, then go right ahead. Friendships can sour easily due to miscommunication and in this case, you are obliged to deliver at least decent results if you accept your friend's offer to cover his wedding. You need to be confident in your abilities and plan ahead on what needs to be covered for the wedding.

Discuss and talk over with your friend what exactly he wants, and ask questions on how the ceremony will proceed, any particular restrictions, like if flash is permitted and things like that. Find out the lighting conditions prior to the wedding and if possible, attend a rehearsal.


In terms of lenses and equipment, the 18-70 kit lens is good enough for now. In decent lighting, it shall suffice. Just ensure your lens and body combo is not back-focusing like many D70 users who have found out.

Your 256MB CF may not be enough. Try to get at least another 256MB or a 512MB.

Get a spare battery for your body and get a SB-800 flash. With your 18-70, you'll need flash to supplement. Set the EV down to around -1 to -1 2/3EV to just fill-in the scene and not overpower the ambient light. Adjust according to the situation.

Leave your Cir-PL and tripod behind. Unlikely you'll need it.

If flash is not permitted, then a 50mm F1.8 might come in handy just in case. Cheap and good lens. Less than $200.
 

Adiemus

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oh yeah... 2nd battery.... very important..... extra batteries for flash also.... ;)
 

nikor_d

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Jun 17, 2004
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Hi finkster,Thank you so very much for your advise. :)Yes, you're right this is my first time.I did told him that this is my first time.You mention that,Set the EV down to around -1 to -1 2/3EV to just fill-in the scene and not overpower the ambient light. Adjust according to the situation.[/COLOR]Are you referring to the flash SB 800 or the camera?I would appreciate if you could explain more about on the (Just ensure your lens and body combo is not back-focusing like many D70 users who have found out.) Do I need to adjust my camera?Please advise.

finkster said:
I assume this would be your first wedding shoot?

First and foremost, you need to realise the awesome responsibility of being the primary photographer for a wedding. Unless your friend is perfectly aware of your inexperience and is willing to take the risk, or if you are the backup photographer, then go right ahead. Friendships can sour easily due to miscommunication and in this case, you are obliged to deliver at least decent results if you accept your friend's offer to cover his wedding. You need to be confident in your abilities and plan ahead on what needs to be covered for the wedding.

Discuss and talk over with your friend what exactly he wants, and ask questions on how the ceremony will proceed, any particular restrictions, like if flash is permitted and things like that. Find out the lighting conditions prior to the wedding and if possible, attend a rehearsal.


In terms of lenses and equipment, the 18-70 kit lens is good enough for now. In decent lighting, it shall suffice. Just ensure your lens and body combo is not back-focusing like many D70 users who have found out.

Your 256MB CF may not be enough. Try to get at least another 256MB or a 512MB.

Get a spare battery for your body and get a SB-800 flash. With your 18-70, you'll need flash to supplement. Set the EV down to around -1 to -1 2/3EV to just fill-in the scene and not overpower the ambient light. Adjust according to the situation.

Leave your Cir-PL and tripod behind. Unlikely you'll need it.

If flash is not permitted, then a 50mm F1.8 might come in handy just in case. Cheap and good lens. Less than $200.
 

meepokman

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Hi Nikor_d,

from my personal experience. Shoot either jpeg (Fine Large) or TIFF. Either ways, your 256 mb CF card is not enough.

Do nto shoot NEF as eventually you will spend alot of time converting it to wither tiff ir jpeg.

* When you burn a copy of the pics on a CD for the couple, many request in jpeg format as it is easier for them to view on any computers.
 

Adiemus

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May 21, 2004
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nikor_d said:
Hi finkster,Thank you so very much for your advise. :)Yes, you're right this is my first time.I did told him that this is my first time.You mention that,Set the EV down to around -1 to -1 2/3EV to just fill-in the scene and not overpower the ambient light. Adjust according to the situation.[/COLOR]Are you referring to the flash SB 800 or the camera?I would appreciate if you could explain more about on the (Just ensure your lens and body combo is not back-focusing like many D70 users who have found out.) Do I need to adjust my camera?Please advise.
I think he's referring to the flash. ;)
 

KNIGHT ONG

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Dec 18, 2003
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I assume you using D70 + 18-70mm kit len + flash? + 256MB CF card.

1. The CF memory card is not enough, need at least another 2x 512MB for whole day!
2. Setting using min f5.6 and 1/30-1/60sec for night and group shooting.
3. Using jpeg large and fine mode should get you around 90+ in 256MB card.
4. Your kit lens is good enough to do all the jobs .. :)

Good luck
 

neokn

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Mar 13, 2004
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Hi nikor_d,

You might need the following on top of what you have:

1) spare camera battery
2) 1 x 1GB CF card (if shooting in NEF, else 512MB should be sufficient, though I personally prefer more so that no need to change card and transfer to portable storage that often... ;) )
3) Flash (like what the others have suggested either SB-600 or SB-800 should be fine)
4) 8 x AA batteries for flash (assuming u r not using the quick recharge pack of SB-800)

Hope this is useful for you...
 

espn

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Hi, please let me know if I can tag along and assist you in the shoot :)
 

nikor_d

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Jun 17, 2004
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Million thanks to all of you out there.Thank you so very much.I'm so proud to be a member of ClubSnap, all for you are so helpful,once again my sincere thanks to all of you. :)
 

scanner

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espn said:
Hi, please let me know if I can tag along and assist you in the shoot :)
Me too..... I want to learn! Me newbie must learn more. :D
 

jOhO

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u don't have enuff memory! trust me on this!

a typical full day wedding nets at least 300 good shots (this the the amount of photos that usually goes in an album). to get 300 good shots, how many do u think you will be shooting? 400? 500? 1000? it does depend on individual and skill level. also many shots need a confirmation shot, expecially group shots. don't be afraid to take 2 or even 3 shots for warranty, after all u're on digital, it doesn't cost u anything to make sure.

i'm not saying that u have to go out and buy a 1gb card now, but you need to consider memory problems. at least have something to d/l to, a laptop, nixvue or watever they are. (i never use them, cos i almost always bring my laptop out as i prepare a simple slideshow presentation of the day's events during the reception b4 the banquet).

that's for the technical side. the non-technical side.. er... have fun, but don't forget your responsibility! ;)
 

scanner

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jOhO said:
u don't have enuff memory! trust me on this!

a typical full day wedding nets at least 300 good shots (this the the amount of photos that usually goes in an album). to get 300 good shots, how many do u think you will be shooting? 400? 500? 1000? it does depend on individual and skill level. also many shots need a confirmation shot, expecially group shots.
Try shooting films....your bad shots tolerance level must be very small. ;)
Anyway, thats is the beauty of digital.... shoot and delete if the shots taken can't make it. :D

But I've to agree that individual skill level plays an important role. Think before you shoot and do plentiful of pre-empting. :cool:
 

2100

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Mar 3, 2004
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Why not just get some of the good helpful chaps here on CS to shoot for a nominal fee. :) Say $200 excluding printing, assuming that your friend is on an ultra tight budget. I am sure there will be at least 50 raising hands. You can learn along the way. Though actual wedding day photography is not difficult relatively speaking, it is not for someone to go solo even if he has taken 5,6 weddings as backup before..... And that's already a very nice way of putting it across, am sure a lot would want the "software" to be of a much higher calibre.

Else you will die of fright on the actual day coz you will be blur like sotong (even if it's ROM), or the couple won't like the pics, or the parents won't like the pics, or some of the relatives will kbkp, then at the end of the day in front of the computer doing post-processing you would have a puky feeling if they like the shots, one or more factors i can guarantee will surely come true.

Of coz try to choose the good ones, ask for portfolios first. :)

A bit OT : You asked about equipment needed, of course this is a valid basic question. But ignoring that for a sec, you ask me now if one really wants to capture the true essence of the magical day, hardware factors like type of lens/filters/mumbo-jumbo, sharpness of the glass, camera body are really minute differences if you are not comparing 5k to 100 dollars equipment. I used to believe that hardware can mask deficiencies a lot, you gotta look at the work of the true masters (do see some of the good photogs with more than 10 years experience, guarantee you will see things differently).....so good luck in finding one for your own if you are not married. :) Proof is in the pudding, look at their work and ask for a lot to check for consistency. A good pro will have a very high % of good shots, even with only moderate hardware. You ask me now, good hardware and thus wanna charge me high? Big deal.
 

Kenji

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yeah, follow as above those expertis say. You need a flash, wide angle lens, and zoom lens. Today I went to my friend's sister wedding, thought I am not the hire photographer, I only use my D70, with kits lens (18-70mm) and 50mm f/1.8. What I did was keep switching the lens, as I only use apeture mode to shoot, because I don't have a flash with me. Weird things is the hire photographer is using Sb-28 on D70 to take picture for them.
 

Adiemus

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May 21, 2004
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es0teric said:
yeah, follow as above those expertis say. You need a flash, wide angle lens, and zoom lens. Today I went to my friend's sister wedding, thought I am not the hire photographer, I only use my D70, with kits lens (18-70mm) and 50mm f/1.8. What I did was keep switching the lens, as I only use apeture mode to shoot, because I don't have a flash with me. Weird things is the hire photographer is using Sb-28 on D70 to take picture for them.
with regards to the SB-28 on a D70. it's okay if the guys shoots in "M" or "A" right? ;)
I used to shoot with an SB-26 on my D70 in "M" mode.... :)
 

2100

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Adiemus said:
I used to shoot with an SB-26 on my D70 in "M" mode.... :)
I think you mean variable power in manual mode right? Can, why not? Usually the lighting doesn't change much other than moving from outdoors to indoors and vice-versa. If you are fast enough to gauge and know the basics of exposure at the back of your hand and can more or less calculate the exposure fast enough. But do remember, digital is not as forgiving as flim. By the time you react to overexposure on the blinking highlights or histogram, the moment will be gone.

Playing with manual varipower and auto-thyristor kind of modes will let you appreciate and understand proper flash exposure. This is good before you proceed to auto iTTL.
 

finkster

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Whatever you decide to buy to help you in your wedding coverage, just make sure you familiarise yourself with your gear. Buying the stuff one day before is not a good idea.

Practice taking good and consistent shots with your flash. Fumbling at the front of the church hall with everyone looking is going to be mighty embarassing, not just you but for your friend.

If there is a major problem, kneel down to reduce your profile and don't make sudden or jerky movements. Move to the side if possible. Also, don't look puzzled why something is not going the way you want it. Stay calm and figure the problem out with your back to the congregation, but keep an eye on the proceedings.

Make a mental checklist of camera settings to verify before commencing the shoot. Accidental movement of the AF or metering switches can be disastrous if you are not alert while shooting.

If you can, bring along a simple PnS digicam or compact film cam to back you up. If something happens to your D70, at least you have some shots to show for. A film SLR would be best if you have one. Get one loaded with film ready in your bag just in case.

Good luck.
 

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