Save Our Landmarks


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yeobt

New Member
May 23, 2007
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#1
Are key landmarks from the early years of Singapore's nationhood fast disappearing through redevelopment?

Conservation these days no longer just involves colonial bungalows and shophouses. We examine 11 noteworthy modern buildings and structures which risk demolition if things are left to chance.

Tell us which ones you hope to see conserved by voting.

Voting closes on June 14 at 6pm.



http://www.straitstimes.com/STI/STIMEDIA/sp/landmarks/

i voted golden mile complex
 

yanyewkay

Senior Member
Sep 22, 2004
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Cons digger.
#2
forget it.. i doubt it's going to happen, sg is developing so fast there is no room for nostalgia :cry:
The new blood that takes the reign of urban development will not have much emotional strings attached to these icons.

Very soon, we will have to pay money just to see an old bus stop and pictures of landmarks.
 

sORe-EyEz

Senior Member
Jun 28, 2005
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#3
still very much miss the Stamford Rd library... :cry:
 

xtemujin

Senior Member
Apr 1, 2005
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Singapura, Singapore
#4
It's falling on death ears.

The old National Library was torn down to make way for a tunnel road.

A lot of ding-dong like taking feedback but in the end, it's just a formality.
 

sORe-EyEz

Senior Member
Jun 28, 2005
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#5
the voting system is flawed. it should be to vote for 1 to tear down. :think: being able to caste a vote each time on that list goes to show it really is just a formality! :thumbsd:
 

xtemujin

Senior Member
Apr 1, 2005
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Singapura, Singapore
#6
Voting for eleven landmarks, which means only one landmark will be saved.

My condolences to the other ten landmarks, you're the weakest link.
 

sbs99

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 17, 2002
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#7
yah ...why cant they save the other landmarks? :thumbsd:
 

aeskywan

New Member
Feb 13, 2007
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#8
Its plain dollars and sense. As the recent news article on Saturday mentioned. Unlike other countries where the government either works to conserve and hence use tax payer's money or offer developers monetary incentives to conserve and preserve. Here the government says one word... We appeal to the civic mindness of the society.....

However tell that to a developer who stands to lose millions of dollars in conserving...he might as well save the money and just tear down.

Also honestly until the news articles and all, who really gives a hoot about all these buildings? No one really cares, not now and not in the near future..... Plain economics and growth matters more than some old buildings.

Until we change the whole mindset of the government and the people... all these talk of conservation is just talk.... and no action.
 

sORe-EyEz

Senior Member
Jun 28, 2005
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#9
Its plain dollars and sense. As the recent news article on Saturday mentioned. Unlike other countries where the government either works to conserve and hence use tax payer's money or offer developers monetary incentives to conserve and preserve. Here the government says one word... We appeal to the civic mindness of the society.....

However tell that to a developer who stands to lose millions of dollars in conserving...he might as well save the money and just tear down.

Also honestly until the news articles and all, who really gives a hoot about all these buildings? No one really cares, not now and not in the near future..... Plain economics and growth matters more than some old buildings.

Until we change the whole mindset of the government and the people... all these talk of conservation is just talk.... and no action.
sad but largely true. people who care are not in any position to effect change- which is to conserve. :complain:

cant the bus-stop be dismantled & put in a museum?
 

aeskywan

New Member
Feb 13, 2007
104
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#15
There is sheer apathy about our history and heritage here... in the 1970s pretty much of everything had already been demolished. We only conserve when it's too late. Commercialisation over heritage.
The thing is sometimes conservation means leaving things as they are and letting them grow naturally. Example Little India, it is the best example of conservation at it's best in Singapore. The colours, the life and everything about that place is as authentic as it was in the 1960s. Of course there are changes but then the way things are going are still pretty much the same as before. Ironically the place is conserved because no one developed that area nor bothered to modernize it.

Here in Singapore, in the quest for cleanliness and efficiency and maximum profits, conservation means artificial history like Chinatown where you drive out all the former residents and increase rents to sky rocket prices to shops selling all sorts of tourist souvenirs mass produced in China. I guess having them made in China is the only Chinese thing about Chinatown now.
 

yanyewkay

Senior Member
Sep 22, 2004
3,924
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Cons digger.
#16
It's falling on death ears.

The old National Library was torn down to make way for a tunnel road.

A lot of ding-dong like taking feedback but in the end, it's just a formality.
I really don't see how that tunnel saved me any time or improved traffic which wasn't bad to begin with. I missed that library..:bheart::bheart:
 

sORe-EyEz

Senior Member
Jun 28, 2005
1,572
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#19
& i guess the worse thing is that effort has been put in to conserve 1 'lucky' landmark through public votes.. :confused:

the bus-stop could easily fit into our spanking new National Museum loh, and used as a rest area.
 

#20
The thing is sometimes conservation means leaving things as they are and letting them grow naturally. Example Little India, it is the best example of conservation at it's best in Singapore. The colours, the life and everything about that place is as authentic as it was in the 1960s. Of course there are changes but then the way things are going are still pretty much the same as before. Ironically the place is conserved because no one developed that area nor bothered to modernize it.

Here in Singapore, in the quest for cleanliness and efficiency and maximum profits, conservation means artificial history like Chinatown where you drive out all the former residents and increase rents to sky rocket prices to shops selling all sorts of tourist souvenirs mass produced in China. I guess having them made in China is the only Chinese thing about Chinatown now.
You will end up with a heritage area with heritage shell buildings with no heritage trades and no heritage feel. Chinatown feels like a giant theme park.
 

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