S9500 - High Speed Pics


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jonlau1

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Dec 14, 2005
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Chaps and Chapettes

I just bought a Fujifilm S9000 and am trying to explore the capabilities of the camera. I'm pretty new to all this ISO and apeture and shutter speed stuff.

Anyway I want to be able to take pics of cars racing, but with the car in focus and the background out of focus.

Similar to pics found here (taken on a Canon Powershot S2IS):

http://www.houston-imports.com/forums/showthread.php?t=199749&page=9

and here (see the last pic):
http://www.houston-imports.com/forums/showpost.php?p=3094912&postcount=69

Also can anyone tell me what sort of settings i need to get a picture like the fourth one in this set (the one of the bronze car rim):
http://www.houston-imports.com/forums/showpost.php?p=3094912&postcount=69

To date I haven't been able to get anything like this. I need help!

Cheers
Jon.
 

michhy

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Oct 21, 2005
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jonlau1 said:
Anyway I want to be able to take pics of cars racing, but with the car in focus and the background out of focus.
For in-focus cars and blurred background, you will have to perform a trick called panning. Its basically using a not-too-fast shutter speed coupled with hands movement - you follow the car as it moves. This creates the blurred background effect.

If you use a too fast shutter speed, then both the car AND the background will be frozen - not the effect you wanted.

Hope this helps.
 

ultrazoom

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Apr 21, 2002
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michhy said:
For in-focus cars and blurred background, you will have to perform a trick called panning. Its basically using a not-too-fast shutter speed coupled with hands movement - you follow the car as it moves. This creates the blurred background effect.
I think he's more interested in achieving bokeh/shallow depth of field if I'm not wrong.
 

michhy

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ultrazoom said:
I think he's more interested in achieving bokeh/shallow depth of field if I'm not wrong.
why would he be interested in BOKEH in a motorsport shootout? :sweat:

Looking at the sample photos he linked to, it is more likely he may want to:
1. freeze the entire motion (use high ISO, high shutter speeds)
2. do panning shots (use average ISO, normal shutter speeds and perform camera panning)
 

bpribadi

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jonlau1 said:
Chaps and Chapettes

I just bought a Fujifilm S9000 and am trying to explore the capabilities of the camera. I'm pretty new to all this ISO and apeture and shutter speed stuff.

Anyway I want to be able to take pics of cars racing, but with the car in focus and the background out of focus.

Similar to pics found here (taken on a Canon Powershot S2IS):

http://www.houston-imports.com/forums/showthread.php?t=199749&page=9

and here (see the last pic):
http://www.houston-imports.com/forums/showpost.php?p=3094912&postcount=69

Also can anyone tell me what sort of settings i need to get a picture like the fourth one in this set (the one of the bronze car rim):
http://www.houston-imports.com/forums/showpost.php?p=3094912&postcount=69

To date I haven't been able to get anything like this. I need help!

Cheers
Jon.

Car racing... moving object means high shutter speed, 1/200 second or faster.

Blur background law:
1. large aperture
2. tele end of the zoom, 200 mm above
3. get as close as possible to the subject, while the object as far as possible to the background. So the ratio of object to background / camera to object has to be as large as possible.

My2cents.
 

ultrazoom

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michhy said:
why would he be interested in BOKEH in a motorsport shootout? :sweat:
A number of sports photo I've seen have that. They're not deliberate since most of them would have been the results from great DLSR with tele lenses, very wide aperture to achieve faster shutter speed for freezing the subjects.

Panning will result in more of motion blur on the background, than the out of focus effect he wishes to achieve.
 

michhy

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ultrazoom said:
Panning will result in more of motion blur on the background, than the out of focus effect he wishes to achieve.
Well I guess all he needs to do is follow bpribadi's advise to get shallow DOF.
But I dont think he can get that close to the moving cars :think:
 

megascriler

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Jun 18, 2005
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why need to zoom all the way?
 

bpribadi

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megascriler said:
why need to zoom all the way?
??? You mean why must use tele end to get background blur? Try it out yourself, make a close up with wide and tele, same framing, see which one has background more blur than the other ;)
 

megascriler

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yeah but why is it so? The technical aspect?
 

michhy

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megascriler said:
yeah but why is it so? The technical aspect?
definately technical.
at wide angle, the glasses in the lense are usually very close together
at telephoto, then glasses in the lense are usually further away...:think:

but its not important to understand it, as long as we know how to make the camera work the way we wanted it. Its like, I dont understand why raising the pressure to 1.6bar is optimum for my turbo, but as long as it gives me the power I wanted at 4000-5000 rpm I'm happy :sweatsm:
 

jonlau1

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Dec 14, 2005
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Guys

All i would like to do is capture the car in focus, and the background out of focus - what sort of settings do i need (eg ISO and shutter speed) to do this?

For example, if you look at the 4th pic on the first hyperlink, this is exactly the type of shots i'd like to try replicate...

Seems like there are a few views...

Help please!

Cheers
Jon
 

megascriler

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Jun 18, 2005
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Zoom to full tele, pan your camera and take snap the pictures as the car moves. Then you will have a sharp car with blurred background.

I also don't think you need to get too close to the car, as it would make panning more difficult as you need to move faster. Having more tele is better.
 

michhy

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Oct 21, 2005
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jonlau1 said:
For example, if you look at the 4th pic on the first hyperlink, this is exactly the type of shots i'd like to try replicate...
Do you mean the photo of the car mirror reflecting a Sparco seat?
If that is what you want, it is called shallow Depth of field.
You can do this.

walk up to the car, set to the largest Aperture you have (that means a small F-stop number, example F3.2) and shoot.
 

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