Rising NightSky


Status
Not open for further replies.
#1
Hi guys and gals. What Im trying to show in this photo is how the clouds move out from the horizons. This was my first try at BULB Photography and I could maybe have some comments on how or what I should do to improve it.

The shutter was left opened at 3 mins. And i know that the horizon is a bit slanting due to the tripod that I was using. I should get a manfrotto yah? Haha.

 

ahbian

Senior Member
May 23, 2006
2,467
0
0
#2
It might be your intention to show the clouds moving, however translated into a photo, I see it just like any normal mass of clouds.

Your long exposure time has caused the lighted part lose all details.
 

May 6, 2006
275
0
0
Singapore
www.flickr.com
#5
I'm wondering how a tripod caused the tilt that could not be adjusted before taking the shot?

On the photo itself, the building lights look blown. Perhaps try other shorter exposure times? What aperture was chosen? Some post-processing might be good to reduce the orange color cast.

Hi guys and gals. What Im trying to show in this photo is how the clouds move out from the horizons. This was my first try at BULB Photography and I could maybe have some comments on how or what I should do to improve it.

The shutter was left opened at 3 mins. And i know that the horizon is a bit slanting due to the tripod that I was using. I should get a manfrotto yah? Haha.

 

#6
I'm wondering how a tripod caused the tilt that could not be adjusted before taking the shot?

On the photo itself, the building lights look blown. Perhaps try other shorter exposure times? What aperture was chosen? Some post-processing might be good to reduce the orange color cast.
Well the tripod's ball head was kinda loose so it gradually tilts sideways you know. Yeah the light seem to be lown out so maybe I'll consider leaving the shutter on for maybe a few seconds rather than 3 minutes!!

btw, thanks fior your comments
 

nemesis32

Senior Member
Oct 16, 2003
3,717
1
0
43
Singapore
Visit site
#7
I;m not sure if it will work but u can try it. it;s the same technique i use for fire works. basically u expose the bottom part of the picture for a "normal" night scene, prob 10-30secs depends... , then try and use a cardboard to block out the bottom bit and expose the rest of the exposure on the sky/cloud u trying to capture.

What this will do is to make sure ur lower part of the pic remains sharp and also not overexpose by the super long exposure.
 

Status
Not open for further replies.
Top Bottom