Reverse Marco


Status
Not open for further replies.

Snoweagle

Senior Member
Jan 26, 2005
14,002
0
0
Pasir Ris, Singapore
#2
I can't explain in detail but i can tell u that reverse macro is when you add a reverse adapter ring to your SLR/DSLR mount, it allows you to screw in your lens head in first where the rear element of your lens is now facing front. This way, the magnification is larger and can take objects at very close distance, some even closer than 1:1 ratio.

Do not that these reverse adapter rings come with various thread sizes to fit different lens thread diameters and only manual focusing is allowed, unless you get those with AF such as those from NovaFlex (i think it's spelt this way) for around $429 but it's an overkill. The usual adapter ring costs around $45.
 

yanyewkay

Senior Member
Sep 22, 2004
3,924
0
0
Cons digger.
#3
the adaptor ring costs <$30 for Nikon. Other brands I'm not too sure. Depending on the camera you use, you might lose metering functions as well and the camera might refuse to fire.

You can also hand hold the reverse lens (normally a 50mm prime) if you don't want to buy a adaptor.

And you will achieve mag ratios greater than 1:1.

Snoweagle: what does closer than 1:1 ratio means?
 

Snoweagle

Senior Member
Jan 26, 2005
14,002
0
0
Pasir Ris, Singapore
#4
yanyewkay said:
the adaptor ring costs <$30 for Nikon. Other brands I'm not too sure. Depending on the camera you use, you might lose metering functions as well and the camera might refuse to fire.

You can also hand hold the reverse lens (normally a 50mm prime) if you don't want to buy a adaptor.

And you will achieve mag ratios greater than 1:1.

Snoweagle: what does closer than 1:1 ratio means?
As what u've said, mag ratios greater than 1:1 :)
 

lsisaxon

Senior Member
Nov 29, 2004
11,941
0
0
#5
yanyewkay said:
the adaptor ring costs <$30 for Nikon. Other brands I'm not too sure. Depending on the camera you use, you might lose metering functions as well and the camera might refuse to fire.

You can also hand hold the reverse lens (normally a 50mm prime) if you don't want to buy a adaptor.

And you will achieve mag ratios greater than 1:1.

Snoweagle: what does closer than 1:1 ratio means?
Hand holding is good because you can tilt the lens to get a wider depth of field also. :)
 

yanyewkay

Senior Member
Sep 22, 2004
3,924
0
0
Cons digger.
#6
yups. I ever saw a website (which i lost the link) that used the rubber lens hood to the reversed lens and there you have a cheap T/S lens :D

the only catch is that you need to use a lens that projects a larger image circle than the format you are using. The example used a MF lens onto a 35mm film.

not sure FF onto APS-C works or not.. but so far I don't have probs
 

Snoweagle

Senior Member
Jan 26, 2005
14,002
0
0
Pasir Ris, Singapore
#7
Just OT a bit, sometimes i feel that the reverse macro will make the images too large so why not use close up filters instead?
 

yanyewkay

Senior Member
Sep 22, 2004
3,924
0
0
Cons digger.
#11
Snoweagle said:
Just OT a bit, sometimes i feel that the reverse macro will make the images too large so why not use close up filters instead?
i guess you work with relative large objects then..
 

lsisaxon

Senior Member
Nov 29, 2004
11,941
0
0
#13
yanyewkay said:
yups. I ever saw a website (which i lost the link) that used the rubber lens hood to the reversed lens and there you have a cheap T/S lens :D

the only catch is that you need to use a lens that projects a larger image circle than the format you are using. The example used a MF lens onto a 35mm film.

not sure FF onto APS-C works or not.. but so far I don't have probs
Why didn't I think of a rubber lens hood? I was holding the lens and trying to shield the gap at the same time.. I think it shouldn't matter for reverse mounting, if you use a wide enough lens, it should be able to cover, but you will get some nasty aberrations at the corners.
 

lsisaxon

Senior Member
Nov 29, 2004
11,941
0
0
#14
Snoweagle said:
Just OT a bit, sometimes i feel that the reverse macro will make the images too large so why not use close up filters instead?
Use what you think is necessary. When you're trying to shoot a 1mm x 1mm piece of silicon chip on a grain of rice, what's too big?
 

Snoweagle

Senior Member
Jan 26, 2005
14,002
0
0
Pasir Ris, Singapore
#15
lsisaxon said:
Use what you think is necessary. When you're trying to shoot a 1mm x 1mm piece of silicon chip on a grain of rice, what's too big?
LOL. I won't shoot that kind of things but if really want to do that, i would've bought the MP-E 65mm Macro Photo lens. :)
 

espn

Deregistered
Dec 20, 2002
21,905
0
0
Planet Nikon
#16
Reverse macro is the process of reversing a glass like the 35/50mm and manually focus (use body to shift in and out).

Everything is manual, from exposure, to flash to focusing.

Nikon users can use the BR-2A to reverse mount a 52mm glass to do macro. Note that you'll have to manually open up the aperture ring by pushing the notch, else you can't see anything at f/8 or f/16.

Full manual mode is necessary to adjust shutter, aperture & flash. Follow studio's exposure coupled with manual flash will do just fine.

Here are some shots taken with 50mm f/1.8 reversed (@ f8~f11) handheld, no reverse ring off a D100 @ manual exposure and manual flash exposure with SB-800.





 

lsisaxon

Senior Member
Nov 29, 2004
11,941
0
0
#18
Snoweagle said:
LOL. I won't shoot that kind of things but if really want to do that, i would've bought the MP-E 65mm Macro Photo lens. :)
Nice lens to have. :)
 

lsisaxon

Senior Member
Nov 29, 2004
11,941
0
0
#19
espn said:
Reverse macro is the process of reversing a glass like the 35/50mm and manually focus (use body to shift in and out).

Everything is manual, from exposure, to flash to focusing.

Nikon users can use the BR-2A to reverse mount a 52mm glass to do macro. Note that you'll have to manually open up the aperture ring by pushing the notch, else you can't see anything at f/8 or f/16.

Full manual mode is necessary to adjust shutter, aperture & flash. Follow studio's exposure coupled with manual flash will do just fine.

Here are some shots taken with 50mm f/1.8 reversed (@ f8~f11) handheld, no reverse ring off a D100 @ manual exposure and manual flash exposure with SB-800.
I see you're using a G lens? Otherwise you'll jsut need to open up the aperture using the ring and it will remain open. I only had a Sigma 18-125 when I had to shoot that grain of rice! Had to do so many thing with my hands, I had to get a colleague to press the shutter for me. :)
 

Status
Not open for further replies.
Top Bottom