resolution question..


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nsr182

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Feb 26, 2008
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#1
i was just comparing some of my frens photos with mine...
while reading the exif... i saw something different with the dpi...

1) whats the diff with a higher dpi and a lower dpi...

2) Nikon D60 is showing --> Horizontal Resolution 300 dpi
Vertical Resolution 300 dpi
Canon 40D is showing --> Horizontal Resolution 72 dpi
Vertical Resolution 72 dpi

what diff does this make.. even both are 10mp cameras...
is there any diff in picture quality?? :dunno:
 

ZerocoolAstra

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2008
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#2
You should be able to set the resolution of the jpeg output file into "small medium large", and also "basic normal fine"
(or similar terms).
One of the settings definitely affects the dpi of the jpeg output.
So it would appear that the D60 and the 40D are set differently.
 

nsr182

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Feb 26, 2008
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#3
ok..
already tested all sizes for jpeg output on the 40D (except for sRAW n RAW)...
Lfine Lnormal Mfine Mnormal Sfine Snormal...
still when i read the exif it shows that both the horizontal n vertical resolution is 72 dpi...

any idea anyone..
just wanna know more about this...
thanxx...
 

nsr182

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Feb 26, 2008
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#4
anyone??
need to keep on googling then... :p
 

pro_FHM

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Nov 3, 2005
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#5
DPI (Dots Per Inch) usually applies more for printers, whereas images use PPI (Pixels Per Inch).

nowadays DPI & PPI are used interchangeably, but to be precise, they are not the same. A printer may print a few dots to make one pixel.

Hence, a printer with a higher DPI can print photos with better resolution. (think more dots per inch)

but to make things simpler, let's assume DPI = PPI

wrt ur qn about DPI for digital IMAGES, a smaller DPI means it can print out bigger photo.
The DPI for an image means a set of instructions for the printer to print out the image.

for eg,
if an image is 7000 x 7000 pixels, has 70 dpi (ppi), then it means that can print out up to a 100" x 100" (7000 on each side divide by 70)
u can actually change the dpi (ppi) in an image editing program like PS to 350, then it means it can print out max size 20" x 20"

so for a camera, resolution ultimately depends on the no of megapixels, because DPI can be changed on PS, to suit the size of the image u want to print out.

someone correct me if anything i said here is wrong. but dun ask me why canon & nikon have diff settings for DPI.

but again, resolution only determines the max size of photos u want to print out. for sharp/ details in ur pic, u need bigger sensor size, hence i got my full frame canon 5D :devil: :bsmilie: (a medium/ large format camera would even be better :devil::devil:)
 

ortega

Moderator
Staff member
Nov 2, 2004
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#6
if your image is 3000px x 2000px

then at 300dpi the physical size of the resulting print will be 10" x 6.6"
and at 72dpi the physical size of the resulting print will be 41.6" x 27.7"

both of these prints come from the same file
the only difference is that the print from the 300dpi 3000px x 2000px file will look sharper if viewed from the same distance.
 

nsr182

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Feb 26, 2008
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#7
thanx guys..
been reading too..
its a bit confusing..
but i'm getting the idea...
trying out to print an A0 size picture... ;p
 

ZerocoolAstra

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2008
9,522
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rainy Singapore
#8
thanx guys..
been reading too..
its a bit confusing..
but i'm getting the idea...
trying out to print an A0 size picture... ;p
WAH! A0 size is 33.1 x 46.8 inches leh....
That's large.
So at 300dpi, you'll need 139 megapixels.... hahahaha...
At 72dpi, you'll need a more manageable 8 megapixels.
 

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