regarding shutter count.


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izerkudie

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Jan 1, 2010
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#1
hi friends, what to do "if" shutter counts exceed the limit? any advice? or has it ever happen to anyone of you? ;(
 

catchlights

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Sep 27, 2004
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#2
usually it will take very very very long to reach that state under normal use, most people will upgrade to newer model long before that.

even you have use the camera till the shutter failed, all I can say is you already fully utilize your camera, you can spend a few hundreds to replace the shutter unit, or just simply buy a new camera.

hope this help.
 

krishna91

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Oct 14, 2009
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#3
There's no limit. There's a 150k or 300k ESTIMATE, which means that your camera will definitely reach that mark without problems, or at least somewhere around that figure. Also, for amateur users, typical usage will not be more than 20-30k per year, but for someone like me who is pursuing photojournalism, i can easily hit 100k a year from now on. (I hit 40-50k last year in 2009 because I didn't touch my camera for almost 4 or 5 months). It also depends how economically you shoot. I don't shoot 20 frames for each composition. I shoot economically. If you're using a high fps camera and you're a typical amateur you probably will use the 8 or 10fps even if you aren't shooting sports, and that's going to increase your shutter count real fast.

Anyhow, it isn't expensive to replace the shutter. Maybe $300.
 

Edwin Francis

Senior Member
Mar 24, 2006
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#4
You don't have to do anything, just continue using it till it actually fails.
The are various ways to rate the expected/mean life of mechanical devices: mean time between failure (MTBF) is one (google it if you want to know more).
None of them can tell you when your shutter will actually fail. Generally, higher end DSLRs are fitted with more durable shutters, which, on average, will last longer than the shutters on a beginners' model.
That said, there is always the possibility that your shutter will fail on your 1st shoot with a pro-DSLR, and that a 'low-end' DSLR's shutter might last well past 100K exposures.
You might also want to refer to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bathtub_curve

What does it boil down to? Forget about the rated shutter life, go out an use it. If it fails, it fails. Worry about it then. If you have an important shoot, bring backups!
 

izerkudie

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Jan 1, 2010
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#5
ok thanks for the guide, cause till now i'm trying to find programs to check my 450D shutter count:cry:
 

izerkudie

New Member
Jan 1, 2010
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#7
i try that before, but cant. not sure if i use the wrong method? or the program doesnt work for 450D ? :sweat:
 

rgy1993

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Mar 28, 2007
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#8
you can have canon verify it at CSC if youre really that worried...
 

Burnings

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Dec 10, 2009
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#10
No offence to the TS but I think knowing the shutter count is totally irrelevant as it is a wear and tear part. If it breaks down, just fix it. Simple.

It is just like when people buy a car, they dun ask how many shifts does the gearbox takes before breaking down or how many hours does the headlamp last?

I think the manufacturer put this spec down just to fill in the spaces and it doesnt really affect your buying decision does it....

I wonder if manufacturers put something like years before discoloring of body takes place and then questions like "How do I know my body has discolored" threads start popping up.. :)
 

Jul 8, 2009
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Serangoon
#11
People do want to know how many miles on a used car when they buy. Maybe the shutter count is a similar measurement to get an idea of how much longer a used camera that you may be intending to buy may last.
 

Burnings

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Dec 10, 2009
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#13
People do want to know how many miles on a used car when they buy. Maybe the shutter count is a similar measurement to get an idea of how much longer a used camera that you may be intending to buy may last.
Similiar maybe but the point I am getting at is if it is a wear and tear part, it will fail anytime so no point measuring it. If you are buying a used item that is out of warranty, just ask for a personal warranty for a month or two and after that you are on your own. :)
 

izerkudie

New Member
Jan 1, 2010
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#14
true, it may break down anytime, but to be safe..i would rather have the one with lesser shutter count;) . thanks buddy for the info!
 

astrorion

New Member
Oct 1, 2009
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#15
hi friends, what to do "if" shutter counts exceed the limit? any advice? or has it ever happen to anyone of you? ;(

These question is the same when you ask:
1) what happen if broke my running record?

What advice do u need? Is good to break the limit am i right?

Has it ever happen b4? Yes of course!!!

Does that answer the question in u?:think:
 

giantcanopy

Senior Member
Feb 11, 2007
6,232
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#16
far from hitting mine since i hardly shoot, but if shutter count is really high probably get it serviced / replaced if i am going for a holiday, just for that piece of mind since it aint too expensive anyway. thats for me. individual tolerance may vary

ryan
 

catchlights

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Sep 27, 2004
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www.foto-u.com
#17
Similiar maybe but the point I am getting at is if it is a wear and tear part, it will fail anytime so no point measuring it. If you are buying a used item that is out of warranty, just ask for a personal warranty for a month or two and after that you are on your own. :)
if really go and ask for personal warranty for a month or two, we sure see a lot of threads about B&S complaining.

Btw, I don't offer personal warranty for all my used items I sold, not even an hour.
 

May 1, 2008
256
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#18
...and i'm never bothered with the shutter count of my 20 & 30 years old F3 & XK camera respectively but yet they still work excellently today...
 

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