Recommendation on Photography Course


May 11, 2009
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#1
I own a Canon DSLR. I have some basic knowledge most of which picked up on Youtube. I am now considering taking up a course but worried it may be a waste of money as it could cover what I already know.

I am thinking of taking the Basic Photography Course, but can't decide whether to go with Phocus Academy or Canon Imaging Academy.

Could use some expert advise here. How did you guys learn photography? Through courses, books, friends!
 

Aug 30, 2013
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#2
for me, i learnt thru hands-on, and also browse thru the internet. i looked at those photos which i like, noted down the setting, and from there trial and error.

i also attended talks to learn abt photography, and which types suit me most.

also most importantly to accept feedbacks from seniors and experienced photographer.
 

Jun 2, 2012
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#3
Go for the Canon imaging academy first. They will give you a very firm foundation on the usage of the Canon DSLR. Then once you have a firm foundation you can explore other types of shots.
 

Dec 12, 2012
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#4
Go out and shoot. Try out the different challenges that many online sites provide. Like shoot only pictures with a red item as the subject. Or use only lines in a photo. Etc.

A course, I feel (though I have not attended one), will give you the knowledge. But when it comes to photography, the best teacher is experience. Go out. Shoot. Put up photos for critique. Rinse and repeat.

Heck even if you go for a course, you'll have to do the same thing thereafter.
 

richiemccaw1

Senior Member
Feb 21, 2013
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#5
Do check out Scott Kelby's training videos. It is possible to download and/or buy the complete sets. He and his fellow photogs teach quite a few types of photography there, such as wedding, portraits, on location and landscapes.
 

May 11, 2009
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#6
I picked up the basics by watching training videos from Michael the mentor. Which is why I feel the courses might be a waste of money as it would cover what I already know. Thanks for the advise guys. Experience in photography comes from experience by going out and shooting and reviewing.
 

intrance

New Member
Jul 13, 2005
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#7
IMO.. when you go for such courses/workshops, it helps in fasten your photography foundation knowledge.
It does not only cover the theories but also will bring you out to the field to do the practical of what you have learnt..

Anyhow, I learnt through books and magazine cause I dont have much time to attend such courses though I have interest in attending them.


Alternatively, if you are friendly type, why not join photography shoot's gathering that some helpful dudes organise on this forum..
 

undergrd

Senior Member
Jun 16, 2007
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#8
I also agree that joining photography shoot gathering is one of the good alternatives to learn photography... Do try it out.
 

Shizuma

Senior Member
Mar 19, 2012
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#9
1. Read the manual.
2. Read the manual again

3. Practice what your manual says your camera can do
4. Go youtube and get some creative ideas.
 

rhino123

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 1, 2006
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#10
I think getting courses is a good way to go. In courses, you don't just get to learn the basic and/or advance skills, etc. But also get to know people who shared the same interest as yourself and made new friends. I would advise that you go to your nearby community centers first to see if they have any offering, before proceeding to other establishment.
 

lewissac

New Member
Sep 20, 2011
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#11
Grab a few friends who are experienced in photography, organise a trip hang out and shoot. Get guidance from friends. They're the better players. You'll learn more what you can bargained for; IMHO.
 

May 6, 2014
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#12
Some methods I used to get me started last time. I'm still a noob though

1. Read up on photography fundamentals and really understand them.
2. Jio jio friends who are experienced (and willing to share info) to go shoot. U will get valuable advises. The downside is u might end up chit chatting rather than take photos. :bsmilie:
3. read up about composition (and practise those tutorials)
4. browse photography sites (e.g. CS, 500px etc) to get some inspirations
5. Read up or view tutorials on Lightroom (or your preferred photo processing SW). Even a minimum touch-up sometimes brings magic to the shots you thought they were unimpressive at first

I personally subscribe to James Beltz's youtube channel. His videos were created with beginners in mind. A good chance to revise those fundamentals as well.
 

Last edited:
May 11, 2009
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#13
1. Read the manual.
2. Read the manual again

3. Practice what your manual says your camera can do
4. Go youtube and get some creative ideas.
Works the other way around for me :confused:

1. Go youtube and get ideas and wonder if my camera can do it
2. Then read the manual and wow!
 

May 11, 2009
69
0
6
#14
Some methods I used to get me started last time. I'm still a noob though

1. Read up on photography fundamentals and really understand them.
2. Jio jio friends who are experienced (and willing to share info) to go shoot. U will get valuable advises. The downside is u might end up chit chatting rather than take photos. :bsmilie:
3. read up about composition (and practise those tutorials)
4. browse photography sites (e.g. CS, 500px etc) to get some inspirations
5. Read up or view tutorials on Lightroom (or your preferred photo processing SW). Even a minimum touch-up sometimes brings magic to the shots you thought they were unimpressive at first

I personally subscribe to James Beltz's youtube channel. His videos were created with beginners in mind. A good chance to revise those fundamentals as well.
Thanks for these recommendations. Unfortunately, most of my friends use iPhone. Almost wanted to get Lightroom but decided to stick with Canon DPP as I found it is quite good after watching some Youtube videos. Will look at James Beltz's channel and the other sites you mentioned. Thanks.
 

May 11, 2009
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#15
Really appreciate all the advise and recommendations. Realised that photography is a lifelong learning process. Most theory can be found online. Rest is practical. Going for courses...theory already online. Of course they also offer practical, but based on their basic theory lessons. Which is why I feel could be a waste of money and time.

I always browse the outings forum section looking for interesting events. Could not join most events because of the timing. Will keep browsing and hope to join in on one of these outings.
 

donut88

Senior Member
Nov 14, 2008
2,182
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#16
Really appreciate all the advise and recommendations. Realised that photography is a lifelong learning process. Most theory can be found online. Rest is practical. Going for courses...theory already online. Of course they also offer practical, but based on their basic theory lessons. Which is why I feel could be a waste of money and time.

I always browse the outings forum section looking for interesting events. Could not join most events because of the timing. Will keep browsing and hope to join in on one of these outings.
Of coz photography is life time learning. It's considered as an art more than a skill. Someone need some talents to be a good photographer. Just like a musician. Need some music talents to be good at it.
 

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