Recommand camera for aquatic shooting


Devilgod

New Member
May 21, 2013
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Hougang
#1
Hi i'm new in the photography world hope all the senior can recommand me a camera maybe budget below $500 for aquatic shooting
 

Octarine

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
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Pasir Ris
#3
Just to clarify: do you refer to Underwater Photography (while diving) or taking pictures of aquatic life in an aquarium (from outside)?
For the former one we have a sub forum where equipment is discussed as well. There is no simple answer and the required budget usually stops a lot of people to dive into it further.
 

Last edited:

01dsk001

New Member
Jun 2, 2008
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East
#4
The best way to start will be to buy an instant camera with waterproof casing, usually around $15 - $20 in stores that print photos.

After you shoot your first set, print out the results(@$20) and see if you are inspired to explore further.
 

Devilgod

New Member
May 21, 2013
6
0
0
Hougang
#5
Just to clarify: do you refer to Underwater Photography (while diving) or taking pictures of aquatic life in an aquarium (from outside)?
For the former one we have a sub forum where equipment is discussed as well. There is no simple answer and the required budget usually stops a lot of people to dive into it further.
Oh i'm sorry if its not clear.I mean taking pictures of aquatic life in an aquarium
 

Jan 5, 2010
276
0
0
#6
The best way to start will be to buy an instant camera with waterproof casing, usually around $15 - $20 in stores that print photos.

After you shoot your first set, print out the results(@$20) and see if you are inspired to explore further.
You're talking about the film type? If so, certain that those disposable cams will turn many people off.
 

Octarine

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
12,538
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Pasir Ris
#8
Oh i'm sorry if its not clear.I mean taking pictures of aquatic life in an aquarium
Thanks for the clarification. In that case, there is no specific equipment required. Any camera can do it if you know how to position it to avoid reflections and glare.
Search the forum (e.g. for 'aquarium' or 'fish tank'), there are older threads discussing exactly this situation.
 

Devilgod

New Member
May 21, 2013
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Hougang
#11
Thanks all for the great help i believe that the shutter speed for taking aquatic need to be high right?
 

Octarine

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
12,538
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48
Pasir Ris
#12
Thanks all for the great help i believe that the shutter speed for taking aquatic need to be high right?
What brings you to that believe? Explain a bit. Do read up about what shutter speed means and how it affect pictures.
 

rhino123

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 1, 2006
5,243
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NA
#13
Thanks all for the great help i believe that the shutter speed for taking aquatic need to be high right?
Not really. Depend on your subject. If the subject is not moving at all, you really don't need that high a shutter speed. If it is moving very slowly, you don't need extremely high shutter speed either. However, if your lens doesn't has any image stabilization to it, a good rule of thumb is to shoot at 1/(the maximum focal range) of a second to prevent or minimise motion blur from your own hand. For example, if you are shooting with a non-stabilized 100mm macro lens, a good speed would be 1/100 sec.

http://aquariadise.com/aquarium-photography-tips/
http://www.cichlid-forum.com/articles/digi_cam_basics_pt1.php
 

SeAnCoLd

Senior Member
Nov 10, 2008
595
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16
#14
I was in an aquarium related forum previously, and there were much talk about how to take photos of the contents of the aquarium (small 1-2 feet tanks). A flash is absolutely crucial as the aquarium tends to be not very bright and you want a fast shutter speed to freeze action so as to showcase the colors and patterns of the fish and other aquatic life in it. Many of the members recommended 2 to 3 flashes from the sides and from the top of the tank. With multiple flashes, you'll need a triggering system for your camera.

A dslr or mirrorless camera is recommended and a long macro lens is required. Too short a lens and you need to go very near the tank, scaring the fish in it. Macro is needed to ensure the small fish in it gets enough frame coverage.

Lastly, you'll need to clean the glass walls of the tank to ensure clear images. Hope this helps

Oh i'm sorry if its not clear.I mean taking pictures of aquatic life in an aquarium
 

amiidae

New Member
Feb 12, 2006
77
1
0
#15
Thanks all for the great help i believe that the shutter speed for taking aquatic need to be high right?
Depending on your subject. For aquatic photography, generally you need to try achieving the followings :


Raise higher speed for moving subject like fishes and lower for planted tank.

Higher F no. for wider DOF & lower ISO for less grainy image.

Shooting with remote flashes enable you to get good exposure.
 

SeAnCoLd

Senior Member
Nov 10, 2008
595
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16
#17
You're most welcome! Post some of your aquarium photos here when you've taken them!
 

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