Rechargeable Battery For Flash


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Teo

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May 17, 2002
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#1
Understand that some flashes unable to use rechargeable batteries which may damage it. What type of damage will cause since the voltage is 1.2V compared to alkaline battery of 1.5V? How do we determine whether can the flash accept rechargeable battery or not?

Any advise appreciate.

TIA


cheers
 

mpenza

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Jan 18, 2002
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#3
It's more a myth than anything else. I've used NiMH rechargeables for Nikon, Canon, Metz and Achiever flashes without problems for the past 3 years.
 

2100

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Mar 3, 2004
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I think normal alkaline batteries drop in voltage from 1.5V after initial usage, so not much of an issue. The 1.2V of NiMH and stuff stays quite constant until they exhaust. In short, can use. :)
 

Jun 12, 2004
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Teo said:
How do we determine whether can the flash accept rechargeable battery or not?

TIA


cheers
if it fires without blowing up, everything is A-OK. :D

the only problem is that Ni-CD and Ni-MH can output a lot more current (hence faster charging times). some older (read: when policemen wore shorts) flashes may not be built to accept them.
 

Adiemus

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May 21, 2004
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#6
the recharge cycle for the flash is also faster when you use rechargeable batteries.
 

Amfibius

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#7
Adiemus said:
the recharge cycle for the flash is also faster when you use rechargeable batteries.
Yah, I was going to say that too. NiMH batteries have a lower internal resistance than alkaline batteries, so your flash gun will have a shorter recycle time. In fact, it is recommended that you use rechargable batteries for your flash!
 

Teo

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#8
Tks for the advise, seems you guys very much recommend it.
On the other hand, my friend got his two Sunpak flash auto function screwed up (flash fire full power even set to Auto mode), not sure is it due to the Sanyo 2300 metal hydrite battery too strong?


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iffa

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Jul 25, 2004
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I guess that there's nothing wrong with the batteries or your flash light. My advise is to refer to your "flash instruction manual". Even though you've selected an "A" mode on your flash light and it still fires at full output, it might be your subject distance to the flash light is out of range.
 

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