Rates for photos


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maswu

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Jun 16, 2008
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#1
I went to shoot a dinner event and was approached by a guest who wanted to buy my photos. I was thinking of selling him all my photos, unedited jpegs of about 500 odd for $300. Otherwise, I was thinking, if he wanted to choose, to sell him the jpegs at $5 each.

What do you all think? Is it around the market rate? If not, how much do you all think I should charge him? and how should I charge him?

Thanks in advance :)
 

chanxj

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Sep 4, 2006
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#4
ah ic. then just charge a rate u think its fair and ur photo is worth. I think that is the most important part which is respecting your work(good or bad).
 

jkaiser

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Aug 31, 2005
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#5
1. check with the organiser 1st. See what they say, then again ure not being paid so they prob can't say much
2. check with the person who wanna buy, see what he wants to use it for.
 

sykestang

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Jan 18, 2003
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#6
You should check with the organiser first, as the photos belongs to the commissioner of the job, be it paid or not as it is your own free will to volunteer for this job, FOC.

If you ask me, I would reject this private sale totally and ask him to check with the organiser himself if I'm in your shoes. But then, this is my personal feel... YMMV. :)
 

Itsbits

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Feb 13, 2005
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#7
Since when does photos belong to the commissioner of the job??? Unless they sign and pay an exclusive fee or a buy out rights agreement or something to that effect. Rights of the images belongs to the photographer.

N most of the time, if you are doing volunteer work, the organiser will usually just say its up to you to generate your own sale.

n of course we all have to sign off with a "IMHO" here... ;)


You should check with the organiser first, as the photos belongs to the commissioner of the job, be it paid or not as it is your own free will to volunteer for this job, FOC.

If you ask me, I would reject this private sale totally and ask him to check with the organiser himself if I'm in your shoes. But then, this is my personal feel... YMMV. :)
 

Dec 23, 2004
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Sick-Ka-Poor land
#9
I went to shoot a dinner event and was approached by a guest who wanted to buy my photos. I was thinking of selling him all my photos, unedited jpegs of about 500 odd for $300. Otherwise, I was thinking, if he wanted to choose, to sell him the jpegs at $5 each.

What do you all think? Is it around the market rate? If not, how much do you all think I should charge him? and how should I charge him?

Thanks in advance :)
i think u are doing a good job! got some one come and buy ur photos, that means it is really good.

i suggest u consider selling the 1st option to him, that guarantee ur income better.
 

adamdewilde

Senior Member
Jul 11, 2007
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#10
If you're just starting out with events photography a good market rate is $120 an hour, when you feel you're worth it, charge $150 an hour, and unless your doing private events/weddings, you won't get paid much more then that.

You work it out from there.


Best,
aDam


EDIT: sykestang is right though, you should ask with the events organizer first to see if it's alright that you distribute the photos, if you want to be there client again.. But honestly you doing an event for free is bad enough, now they'll always want you to do it for free...
 

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chanxj

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Sep 4, 2006
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#11
Contacting the event organiser is good, but I feel that if ur doing it for free and there is no contract, I don't think there is a commercial agreement between both of you in the first place. The only thing is that do you have a release for the participants of the event? The event organiser would normally have 1 as part of their t&c for ppl attending their events.
 

V

vince123123

Guest
#12
Under the Copyright Act, copyright in the work belongs to the commissioner only where valuable consideration has been provided. Consideration, whilst usually is provided by remuneration, does not have to be limited to payment per se. Legally, consideration can be fulfilled other than by payment of money or money-equilvalent.

However, without further research, I am not sure whether the term "valuable" in "valuable consideration" means that consideration is limited only to money or money-equilvalent.

That said, if it is a purely free event, and there is no benefit attained by the photographer, or detriment avoided, then it can be argued that there is no consideration, valuable or otherwise. In such a case, copyright may vest in the photographer instead of the organiser.

Finally, there is no legal basis for saying that a release for the participants of the event is required. The concept of releases has not been recognised in Singapore.
 

#13
Under the Copyright Act, copyright in the work belongs to the commissioner only where valuable consideration has been provided. Consideration, whilst usually is provided by remuneration, does not have to be limited to payment per se. Legally, consideration can be fulfilled other than by payment of money or money-equilvalent.

However, without further research, I am not sure whether the term "valuable" in "valuable consideration" means that consideration is limited only to money or money-equilvalent.

That said, if it is a purely free event, and there is no benefit attained by the photographer, or detriment avoided, then it can be argued that there is no consideration, valuable or otherwise. In such a case, copyright may vest in the photographer instead of the organiser.

Finally, there is no legal basis for saying that a release for the participants of the event is required. The concept of releases has not been recognised in Singapore.

thanks vince for the help on the law part! :) and also thanks again to everyone who answered :D
 

sykestang

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Jan 18, 2003
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#14
Since when does photos belong to the commissioner of the job??? Unless they sign and pay an exclusive fee or a buy out rights agreement or something to that effect. Rights of the images belongs to the photographer.

N most of the time, if you are doing volunteer work, the organiser will usually just say its up to you to generate your own sale.

n of course we all have to sign off with a "IMHO" here... ;)
This has been argued many times. Check out the new copyright act. :)
 

sykestang

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Jan 18, 2003
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#15
Under the Copyright Act, copyright in the work belongs to the commissioner only where valuable consideration has been provided. Consideration, whilst usually is provided by remuneration, does not have to be limited to payment per se. Legally, consideration can be fulfilled other than by payment of money or money-equilvalent.

However, without further research, I am not sure whether the term "valuable" in "valuable consideration" means that consideration is limited only to money or money-equilvalent.

That said, if it is a purely free event, and there is no benefit attained by the photographer, or detriment avoided, then it can be argued that there is no consideration, valuable or otherwise. In such a case, copyright may vest in the photographer instead of the organiser.

Finally, there is no legal basis for saying that a release for the participants of the event is required. The concept of releases has not been recognised in Singapore.
I believe the term 'consideration' can comes in many form as long as it is accepted by the photographer in the first place. :)

So, a $1000 check, a $10 red packet and all the way to a thank you letter or even a 'thank you' in verbal is also accepted as 'consideration' as long as the photographer accepted the job and fulfill his part based on this consideration in the first place. :)
 

kaomoo

New Member
Dec 8, 2007
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Singapore
#16
I think you should check with organiser too. If anything else, it's just good manner. Let's face it, even though it's a freebie, you wouldn't have generate your work unless you were invited to do the shoot.
 

V

vince123123

Guest
#17
Yup, thats what I said in my earlier post, consideration may not be limited by money. However, acceptance of an assignment per se does not mean that there is consideration. The basic rule is that the photographer must have received some benefit, or avoided some detriment. In this case, it is not clear if either is applicable.

Also, the situation is further complicated by the use of the phrase "valuable consideration" in the Act, which suggests that there is some sort of qualifier to the term "consideration". The term "valuable" has not yet been considered in Singapore as far as I am aware, and further research will be required in order to determine if this has been considered in other jurisdictions.

Whilst S$1,000 or S$10 is likely to be sufficient, a "thank you" per se, is, in my view, very very unlikely to constitute what is required to satisfy the legal requirement of consideration.

It would be a strange situation to say "A contracts with B to take photographs for B in return for B saying "thank you" to A, such that A receives a benefit or avoids a detriment". If in fact, such was the terms of the agreement to begin with. Most, if not all "thank yous" are done after formation and execution of the contract.

I believe the term 'consideration' can comes in many form as long as it is accepted by the photographer in the first place. :)

So, a $1000 check, a $10 red packet and all the way to a thank you letter or even a 'thank you' in verbal is also accepted as 'consideration' as long as the photographer accepted the job and fulfill his part based on this consideration in the first place. :)
 

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