Questions on ND Filter


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#1
Hi all,

I've done a search but I couldn't find any posts on this. I'm new to photography and would like to ask what is a ND filter. I've tried searching on google n wikipedia but I'm still kinda blur. In what situations do you use a ND filter and what does it offer in terms of colour and contrast?

Thanks in advance.
 

trucatus

Senior Member
Jan 3, 2005
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www.camwerkz.com
#2
ND = Neutral Density.

It is use to cut down the intesity of light so that you can use a wider Aperture or lower speed without affecting colour and contrast... Gradual ND can darken sky so that the range of exposure with the darker part of the picture can be closer hence details can e captured.
 

student

Senior Member
Jul 26, 2004
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#4
It is like a sunglass which reduce the amount of light entering the lens so wider apertures can be selected.

Or increase the shutter timing.
 

#5
ok, i tink i kinda get it...

ND = Neutral Density.

Gradual ND can darken sky so that the range of exposure with the darker part of the picture can be closer hence details can e captured.
so with regards to the above statement, a polariser can b used too? am i right?
 

J-Chan

Senior Member
Sep 21, 2005
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#6
a polariser does cut down some light, but its evenly dark unlike the grad ND..
 

zac08

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Feb 21, 2005
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#7
ok, i tink i kinda get it...



so with regards to the above statement, a polariser can b used too? am i right?
A polariser may give you a different colour cast (depending on the angle of light it was cutting off) ND's on the other hand do not give any colour casts.
 

Jul 19, 2005
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Toa Payoh
#9
before buying ND filter, make sure you got one good tripod, one shutter release cable (or remote shutter release)

then you can take wonderful pictures.

ND has no mean without tripod.

the purpose of ND to filter out a certain percentage of the light go through your lens and maximize the shutter open time.
let's say, i want to take a picture of the empty orchard road in day time. so you put ND filter in front, open the shutter for few minutes or even some master can shoot a picture for few months. so all the moving objects pass your lens will almost be ignored.
 

archlover

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Nov 11, 2005
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#11
the exposure is few minutes.. but must try few month until success hehhe
 

picorat

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Nov 10, 2006
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#12
hi,

from what i understand, a ND filter is used to slow down your shutter speed by a certain number of stops.

for example, if you're trying to capture a waterfall on a bright day where your shutter speed may be 1/1000 for 0EV, you'd use a ND filter to "slow down" your shutter speed to say, 1/10 so that you get the nice flowy effect.

polarizers on the other hand, filter out lights by 'shuttering' out light entering at oblique angles which causes glare. they're useful when you want to capture an object which are highly reflective; for example if you use a polarizing filter on clouds you'd get better details; if you use it on a water surface you'd see what's beneath the water.

hope that helps.
 

drewdam

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Jun 18, 2005
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#13
sorry to tap along....

any diff in pic taken with grad ND n ND?
 

Trash

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Dec 12, 2004
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#14
any diff in pic taken with grad ND n ND?
YES! The grad ND filter only has typically have of it as ND. The application is slightly different.

Grad ND is used to reduce the brightness of one half of the image. Most frequently I use it to reduce the brightness of the sky so as to reduce the under-exposure of the ground. Of course there are other ways to use it creatively. Whereas ND is like sunglasses that evenly reduce the light going into the camera.

On another note, NDs are quite useful for advanced P&S e.g. KM A1/A2/A200 or Panasonic FZ-series. These cameras typically have a smallest aperture of only F8 and would be too large for some purposes, e.g. fireworks that may require say F13 at ISO100. So ND can be used to further "reduce" the aperture.
 

drewdam

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Jun 18, 2005
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#15
YES! The grad ND filter only has typically have of it as ND. The application is slightly different.

Grad ND is used to reduce the brightness of one half of the image. Most frequently I use it to reduce the brightness of the sky so as to reduce the under-exposure of the ground. Of course there are other ways to use it creatively. Whereas ND is like sunglasses that evenly reduce the light going into the camera.

On another note, NDs are quite useful for advanced P&S e.g. KM A1/A2/A200 or Panasonic FZ-series. These cameras typically have a smallest aperture of only F8 and would be too large for some purposes, e.g. fireworks that may require say F13 at ISO100. So ND can be used to further "reduce" the aperture.
i am using CPL on my cam to cut off the bright daylight...it seem ND has "about" the same function as CPL except to cut the reflextion...and grad ND look more useful if i will to put it that way..
 

bwilly

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Aug 28, 2004
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#16
A neutral density filter reduces light of all wavelengths or colors equally.
In layman terms -
Wonder why some pics, the sky is so blue, and super colourful?
Some waterfall, the waterflow so silky smooth?

more techincal details.

A ND 8 gives you 3 f-stop.
A ND 4 gives you 2 f-stop.

I got both of the ND, a good buy if you love taking landscape.
 

student

Senior Member
Jul 26, 2004
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#19
These cameras typically have a smallest aperture of only F8 and would be too large for some purposes, e.g. fireworks that may require say F13 at ISO100. So ND can be used to further "reduce" the aperture.


????????
 

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