Question on black card


#1
I went Youtube to search how am I suppose black card for DSLR but I can't find any. Reason is simply because new year is coming and many people always say use a black card when you take the fireworks. Can anyone give me some link or tell me what is a black card for?

Thanks!!!
 

ellery

New Member
Jan 29, 2002
1,188
2
0
57
Visit site
#4
A black card is simply a card which is the material use in mounting photos, artfriend or even popular will have A4 or larger pieces, just try to get something that is matt ie non shiny black.

It is used in conjunction with bulb setting on exposure to litterally allow light to enter the dslr thru the lens. However you may want to try using higher iso example 800 to 3200 depending on yr camera's high iso and noise characteristics with a shutter speed setting of from 1/20 to 1/200 - the fire burst is much brighter than the dark unlit sky. You need to find the iso/shutter speed setting that works for yr shooting sitution. F stop use could work with f5.6 to f8
 

ZerocoolAstra

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2008
9,522
0
0
rainy Singapore
#5
ellery said:
A black card is simply a card which is the material use in mounting photos, artfriend or even popular will have A4 or larger pieces, just try to get something that is matt ie non shiny black.

It is used in conjunction with bulb setting on exposure to litterally allow light to enter the dslr thru the lens. However you may want to try using higher iso example 800 to 3200 depending on yr camera's high iso and noise characteristics with a shutter speed setting of from 1/20 to 1/200 - the fire burst is much brighter than the dark unlit sky. You need to find the iso/shutter speed setting that works for yr shooting sitution. F stop use could work with f5.6 to f8
Your post sounds confusing.
First you talk about bulb mode, then you mention 1/20 to 1/200 speed?

And... err... Light ALWAYS enters the DSLR through the lens :)
 

willdoang

Senior Member
Jun 8, 2010
1,560
2
38
34
east, near dakota MRT
#6
A black card is simply a card which is the material use in mounting photos, artfriend or even popular will have A4 or larger pieces, just try to get something that is matt ie non shiny black.

It is used in conjunction with bulb setting on exposure to litterally allow light to enter the dslr thru the lens. However you may want to try using higher iso example 800 to 3200 depending on yr camera's high iso and noise characteristics with a shutter speed setting of from 1/20 to 1/200 - the fire burst is much brighter than the dark unlit sky. You need to find the iso/shutter speed setting that works for yr shooting sitution. F stop use could work with f5.6 to f8
mounting photos???? u mean like a photo album function :bsmilie::bsmilie:

all light goes through ur lens lo if not where, from ur eyes me lol :bsmilie:

bulb mode use 1/20-1/200 and iso 800-3200 :bigeyes:

ur sentence is arranged and pronounce like a pro but it's much more misleading & confusing, please use much simple words and correct information on giving advice to people lol :bsmilie:
 

Last edited:

ZerocoolAstra

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2008
9,522
0
0
rainy Singapore
#7
Anyway, TS, if you have any more queries about black card technique, kindly ask more specific questions. To explain it thoroughly will be too tedious.
Probably easier to link to specialist sites that will do a better job of explaining :)


THIS site seems not bad. I found it after typing 'black card technique' in google :) It's a bit outdated though, as it keeps referring to film. But the concept is there :)
 

loneWolff

Deregistered
Sep 22, 2010
574
0
0
Commonwealth
#8
If you are beginner at fireworks, skip the blackcard method as it might make it worse.
SG fireworks are mostly congested unlike overseas due to our numerous extremely tall buildings.

My two cents for fireworks beginners;
1) Sturdy tripod, I weight it down with my bag of tricks
2) ISO 100 or lesser (I have seen people shoot higher ISO as they don't care about quality and were shooting handheld)
3) Exposure time 4 secs for F8 - F11, 6 secs for F16

If you are interested in using blackcard, search CS for blackcard.
There are many more qualified people inside CS explaining this one two many times.
So please take the effort to search instead of just randomly post a question. ;)
 

digitalpimp

Senior Member
Oct 25, 2008
2,744
1
0
39
Shèng Gǎng
www.wix.com
#9
Basically, you mount your cam on a tripod. Set it to Bulb Mode. Dial in f8-f16. Lowest ISO possible. Expose. Lock the remote. Cover the lens. If you like the firework, take the cover off for a couple of seconds. If you don't like the next one, just put the cover back and so on and so forth.

A black card can be an illustration board or anything matte black that can cover the entire diameter of your lens.

And yea, don't attach the lens hood.
 

ahbian

Senior Member
May 23, 2006
2,467
0
0
#10
Your post sounds confusing.
First you talk about bulb mode, then you mention 1/20 to 1/200 speed?

And... err... Light ALWAYS enters the DSLR through the lens :)
In the context of taking long exposures, light entering from the viewfinder can have an effect also, especially if there is a strong enough light source behind the camera.

This is why camera straps come with viewfinder cover.
 

ZerocoolAstra

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2008
9,522
0
0
rainy Singapore
#15
ahbian said:
In the context of taking long exposures, light entering from the viewfinder can have an effect also, especially if there is a strong enough light source behind the camera.

This is why camera straps come with viewfinder cover.
Ahh yes you are most certainly right in that regard. Was just making a comment abt the other guy's statement that black card allows light to enter from the lens.
 

zenix84

New Member
Jun 9, 2010
288
0
0
#16
Ahh yes you are most certainly right in that regard. Was just making a comment abt the other guy's statement that black card allows light to enter from the lens.
HAha was almost going to comment on this too, as I read from the DSLR manual. ;p

Anyway on the topic, as some people already mentioned. Black card method is really hard to apply to SG fireworks, as there is SELDOM a long pause inbetween blasts of fireworks. IF you just want nice photos you may want to skip the method altogether.

IF you want to learn it then go ahead. I personally being a newbie and unskilled still don't know how to go about using it. My advice is you can try using it but back up your plans with a auto-mode 1-3 seconds exposure shots. At least you will get some better photos.

Just to add on, I think post processing is especially useful for fireworks photos. Almost can't do without it. You may wish to study it.
 

Jan 7, 2010
384
0
16
www.flickr.com
#17
Anyway on the topic, as some people already mentioned. Black card method is really hard to apply to SG fireworks, as there is SELDOM a long pause inbetween blasts of fireworks. IF you just want nice photos you may want to skip the method altogether.
.
Agrees everything is a rush here in Singapore, even fireworks :)
 

zenix84

New Member
Jun 9, 2010
288
0
0
#18
Agrees everything is a rush here in Singapore, even fireworks :)
Sorry my take on the subject is more of something else.

Looker A: wah this year fireworks great man you see so many boom-boom-bah-bah.

And that is what the organisers want to achieve every year.

The year when various countries teams presented their fireworks - I vaguely remember Japan, Italy, England, Singapore. I personally feel then was the best (viewing wise). You can hear the music and the fireworks are shot according to the beat or rhythm. And of course everyone compared and I never heard anyone saying Singapore's version is best. Grand .. maybe but artistically lacking.

Oh I forgot to mention the drawbacks of having many boom-boom-bah-bah is LOTS of smoke. :bsmilie:
 

Top Bottom