Queenstown


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baileys

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Dec 14, 2003
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#1
Hi!

This is the first night shot pic i took using my D60 and Kitlens. Please advise any improvement to composition/techniques and etc.

Taken at 9pm , as testing my kit lens :p I like the night photography with lights illuminating architecture so this is my first attempt. The green light in the mirror was illuminated by a green pedestrian traffic light.

18mm wide at F/3.5, Shutter 1 Second. Handheld. Uncropped, only resized and a smart sharpen 0.3pixels.
ISO was at 1600, i think.

 

yamapi

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Feb 27, 2008
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#5
He already mention ISO@1600....
Nevertheless,good mood.
 

baileys

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Dec 14, 2003
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Singapore, Singapore, Singapor
#6
Hi guys,

i looked at my original pic, and the above resized one is at 25%, a smart sharpen of 0.3 pixels has been applied (sorry forgot abt this).
I have posted this original 100% crop for reference.

This was taken at 1 second shutter exposure handheld, it was my second day holding the camera(18-55 VR).
It was pretty hard to get a good shot, i used continuous shutter for multiple shots.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2236/2335128812_26b232197d_o.jpg
 

night86mare

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Aug 25, 2006
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#7
at this size it is not really possible to see handshake

good exposure, looks relatively clean but once again, at this size a bit hard to tell

using a tripod, with lower iso will give you a cleaner picture with better sharpness for sure. :)
 

Kit

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Jan 19, 2002
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#8
Composition -

The composition is not ideal. You have to be careful selecting the angle of view. Avoid placing the building too close to the top of the frame. Cropping the building at both ends doesn't work well in this instance. If you can't get the entire building into a single frame, it would be good to consider breaking up the building into parts and document it with a series of images, each capturing bits of the building that interests you.

Then there is the tilt. Your are standing at an angle and tilting your camera upwards, causing perspective distortions which are very disconcerting to look at. Getting the lines straight is absolutely essential. That said, perspective distortion is not all unacceptable in architectural work. You can use the it to create a dynamic composition for the building but in this case, it doesn't work.

Technique -

Doesn't matter what other people tell you or what you think, tripod is an essential tool for architectural work, especially so when its done at night. You are already compromising by using a bigger aperture and high ISO. You image will be noisy and lacking in DOF, both of which is critical for shooting buildings. There's nothing amazing about shooting 1 sec handheld, its just wrong for this type of photography. Camera movement should be limited to absolute minimal to get useable shots. Get yourself a tripod and compare the quality of the photo you take after.
 

aeqmal

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Dec 16, 2006
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#9
Composition -

The composition is not ideal. You have to be careful selecting the angle of view. Avoid placing the building too close to the top of the frame. Cropping the building at both ends doesn't work well in this instance. If you can't get the entire building into a single frame, it would be good to consider breaking up the building into parts and document it with a series of images, each capturing bits of the building that interests you.

Then there is the tilt. Your are standing at an angle and tilting your camera upwards, causing perspective distortions which are very disconcerting to look at. Getting the lines straight is absolutely essential. That said, perspective distortion is not all unacceptable in architectural work. You can use the it to create a dynamic composition for the building but in this case, it doesn't work.

Technique -

Doesn't matter what other people tell you or what you think, tripod is an essential tool for architectural work, especially so when its done at night. You are already compromising by using a bigger aperture and high ISO. You image will be noisy and lacking in DOF, both of which is critical for shooting buildings. There's nothing amazing about shooting 1 sec handheld, its just wrong for this type of photography. Camera movement should be limited to absolute minimal to get useable shots. Get yourself a tripod and compare the quality of the photo you take after.
Hi Kit.
Thanks for the info shared.
Hi Bailey,
Nonetheless, a good attempt considering it's handheld.
 

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