qn on studio photography


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Feb 6, 2009
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hello, hav been reading clubsnap for awhile but never posted as alot of information is available.. I own an online shop and would like to take my pictures in a studio as my attempts to take outdoors / at home against a white background has been unsuccessful (too many shadows!!). Would like to ask if I can take studio shots with a normal point and shoot camera (i own a Canon Powershot A710 & a Canon Ixus - forgot model number)? I would like to upgrade to an SLR but have yet to save up enough! Would appreciate any advice! Thanks in advance all!
 

zac08

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#2
hello, hav been reading clubsnap for awhile but never posted as alot of information is available.. I own an online shop and would like to take my pictures in a studio as my attempts to take outdoors / at home against a white background has been unsuccessful (too many shadows!!). Would like to ask if I can take studio shots with a normal point and shoot camera (i own a Canon Powershot A710 & a Canon Ixus - forgot model number)? I would like to upgrade to an SLR but have yet to save up enough! Would appreciate any advice! Thanks in advance all!
Well, it can be done...

just use table lamps and illuminate the subject clearly and shoot with the camera on a small tripod. Also do correct for the white balance and you'll have decent shots. :)
 

Feb 6, 2009
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hi zac, thank you so much. does that mean i do not need to use a studio? Coz i used my attic to take the pictures, and the lights are on the slanted ceiling. not sure how to get rid of the harsh shadows without overexposing. i tried stepping up the exposure 1 stop (it shows +1/3) on my camera but it is too bright. Setting it to the exposure to auto mode and white balance to the Flouroscent setting makes the colors very dull, which is why i thought of using a studio with proper lighting instead. Is there any way to work around this? Thanks so much!
 

Del_CtrlnoAlt

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Feb 15, 2003
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#5
hello, hav been reading clubsnap for awhile but never posted as alot of information is available.. I own an online shop and would like to take my pictures in a studio as my attempts to take outdoors / at home against a white background has been unsuccessful (too many shadows!!). Would like to ask if I can take studio shots with a normal point and shoot camera (i own a Canon Powershot A710 & a Canon Ixus - forgot model number)? I would like to upgrade to an SLR but have yet to save up enough! Would appreciate any advice! Thanks in advance all!
no. its very hard for beginner, or even for pros to use a P&S to shoot.

Difficulty
1) Flash Trigger
2) DOF (Aperture max f8 for P&S)
3) Focusing

Its easier to use continuous lighting than use studio strobes. but you have to know how to control the light.
 

Jan 28, 2009
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Read up on soft lighting and bounced light (which is just one way to achieve soft lighting). It is absolutely possble with a PnS, maybe even easier than with a DSLR if you intend to shoot small objects using the "macro" mode. All it takes is the appropriate quantity and quality of light, and a tripod.

Google search for "tim talkington" and watch his tutorial videos on studio lighting. Very helpful.

EDIT: Oops. JIM talkington. Not Tim.
 

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Del_CtrlnoAlt

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hi zac, thank you so much. does that mean i do not need to use a studio? Coz i used my attic to take the pictures, and the lights are on the slanted ceiling. not sure how to get rid of the harsh shadows without overexposing. i tried stepping up the exposure 1 stop (it shows +1/3) on my camera but it is too bright. Setting it to the exposure to auto mode and white balance to the Flouroscent setting makes the colors very dull, which is why i thought of using a studio with proper lighting instead. Is there any way to work around this? Thanks so much!
I think you used the wrong setup.

You should be using M mode on your A710, your Ixus can keep.

On M mode, set your aperture & shutter speed accordingly. Shutter speed for strobes does not exceed 1/125 (depend on your cam, tis is only a guide, might only be 1/60)
 

Feb 6, 2009
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#8
Read up on soft lighting and bounced light (which is just one way to achieve soft lighting). It is absolutely possble with a PnS, maybe even easier than with a DSLR if you intend to shoot small objects using the "macro" mode. All it takes is the appropriate quantity and quality of light, and a tripod.

Google search for "tim talkington" and watch his tutorial videos on studio lighting. Very helpful.

EDIT: Oops. JIM talkington. Not Tim.
Thanks alot for the info! i will google it tonight. I am shooting for clothes though, which is why i was wondering if my powershot is able to do the job.

I think you used the wrong setup.

You should be using M mode on your A710, your Ixus can keep.

On M mode, set your aperture & shutter speed accordingly. Shutter speed for strobes does not exceed 1/125 (depend on your cam, tis is only a guide, might only be 1/60)
hello, thanks for your comment, I am using the M mode, ISO200 or 400, depending, exposing it 1 stop up, forgot the shutter speed though. Dont have any studio lighting except for the normal spotlights on the ceiling. Have tried setting White Balance to Auto (dont like the flat color), Sunny/Outdoor (makes the color of my clothes abit different from the real thing), Floroscent. Any ideal setting for me to try out ? Thanks in advance!
 

agws1970

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#9
Thanks alot for the info! i will google it tonight. I am shooting for clothes though, which is why i was wondering if my powershot is able to do the job.



hello, thanks for your comment, I am using the M mode, ISO200 or 400, depending, exposing it 1 stop up, forgot the shutter speed though. Dont have any studio lighting except for the normal spotlights on the ceiling. Have tried setting White Balance to Auto (dont like the flat color), Sunny/Outdoor (makes the color of my clothes abit different from the real thing), Floroscent. Any ideal setting for me to try out ? Thanks in advance!
If you are shooting on a mannequin, then IKEA table lamps should be sufficient with some form of softening. Buy the ones with gooseneck so that you can aim the lights properly. If you are shooting w/o mannequin, you might need some acrylic or glass sheets to lay the clothes on and use a CPL filter to get rid of most reflections.
GOD Bless.
 

Del_CtrlnoAlt

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Feb 15, 2003
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#10
Thanks alot for the info! i will google it tonight. I am shooting for clothes though, which is why i was wondering if my powershot is able to do the job.



hello, thanks for your comment, I am using the M mode, ISO200 or 400, depending, exposing it 1 stop up, forgot the shutter speed though. Dont have any studio lighting except for the normal spotlights on the ceiling. Have tried setting White Balance to Auto (dont like the flat color), Sunny/Outdoor (makes the color of my clothes abit different from the real thing), Floroscent. Any ideal setting for me to try out ? Thanks in advance!
dun think M mode have 1 stop setting since everything is manual...
 

IsenGrim

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Jan 28, 2008
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to get rid of harsh shadows, there are a few things that you need/want.

first is a smooth background. you can get A1 size paper from art friend in bras basar. it works well. color depends on you. it is generally safe to get white. but if you have alot of white objects, its better to get grey paper.

then you need space. your attic seems good enough.

third. you dont need studio lights. they are going to screw you over. you need table lamps. preferably 2-3. can beg borrow steal buy. anything.

next you need bulbs. SAME bulbs for all the lamps. try the hurricane bulbs at your local DIY store. get the daylight color one. (white)

next you need something to prop up your items. i find it weird to have things placed on the floor of studios (even models) because generally people dont put things on the floor unless its worth is not much.

now you can start.
1) stick up the background somewhere. like one a backing of a chair or something. of if you have a clean wall. you can use that too, instead of the paper.

2) place your items about 2 times its own length from the background/wall.

3) light the item with 1 or 2 lamps. eg place 1 lamp to your left aiming at the item. 45degs from the item. place another lamp to your right behind you and aim slightly behind the item.

4) place another lamp outside the picture frame (cannot see in your camera) and light the background.

5) if you find the shadows really too hard, you need parchment paper. or baking sheets. they are 1/2 transparent. with a little yellowish colour. tear 1 big piece and tie around your lamps, all of them. to make it like a paper balloon lidat. that will soften your photos.

if you die die cannot do so much. heres a short cut:
you need 1 wall
parchment paper
1 STRONG lamp

place item 1-2feet from wall on table or something.
tie parchment paper on lamp like a balloon.
place lamp above and directly behind you, aiming straight at item.
shoot under the lamp.
 

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