Qn on Night shoots


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dextorian

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#1
Hi guys,

I am using a D100 at the moment. I went for a night shot last night at marina bay. I was thinking of capturing the full moon with a nice blueish environment. I tried using the aperture priority at f/8, f/11 and f/22. Alas, all my photos turn out to be light photos taken in broad daylight!! How can ths happen?? Too much exposure?? I then tried using the program mode. The program ode set the aperture at f/3.5 (the largest aperture). Pictures turns out nicer but the blueish environment is still not there. As for the moon, I JUST CAN"T CAPTURE IT in a round shape. Turns out that all my moon photos become sun photos!! Why is this so?? What kind of settings should I use?? Please advice.

I will be more than willing to share with you my photos. Problem is, I DON"T KNOW HOW!!!??? So, if someone can advice me, I will post some photos and show you guys.

Thanks in advance.
Dexter
 

dextorian

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#3
Hey vince,

Thanks for your response... BUT!!!

What do you mean when you said lower 2 stops?? If I am using aperture priority at f/8, what do I adjust to get the right results??

Thanks,
Dexter
 

Khaiva

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#4
Originally posted by vince
to shoot the moon, you'll have to under expose by 2 or more stops.



Yeah, you are right. Or else, since you're using D100 try to use spot metering and measure it on the moon you may be able to get 1/125 at F/5.6
Please find mine below, with sigma 50-500 at 500mm (800mm on 35mm Film) crop 100%:

http://www.pbase.com/khaiva/fullmoon

Yeah, it's not that good since the wind blow quite strong and was using cheap tripot.
 

#5
Originally posted by dextorian
Hey vince,

Thanks for your response... BUT!!!

What do you mean when you said lower 2 stops?? If I am using aperture priority at f/8, what do I adjust to get the right results??

Thanks,
Dexter
Try dropping the EV by 2. Alternatively, if you want to capture surrounding areas as well, you'll have to shoot when the moon is up during early evening/late afternoon (when there is still daylight). That way you'll have both the moon, and the surrounding area exposed. Usually shooting the moon alone will give you 1/60 - 1/125 between f/5.6 - f/8.
 

dextorian

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#6
Hey guys,

Thanks so much for the info. I will try it probably tomorrow night since it is raining this evening. By the way, Where do you guys usually post your photos?? Like the pbase, is it free of charge??

Thanks,
Dexter
 

mpenza

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#7
with spot metering, there shouldn't be a need to compensate EV right? unless the spot meter is inaccurate. I used a 2 year-old consumer digicam and could get proper exposure of the moon with the spot meter.
 

roygoh

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#8
If you want to shoot the moon with surrounding (ground objects) at night, the contrast between the moon and the surrounding will most likely be too high for the camera to correctly expose for both. wither the moon will be overexposed or the surrounding be underexposed.

Try mounting your camera on a tripod and take 2 shots of the same scene, the first one metered for the surrounding and the second reduced in exposure to cater for the moon. You can then blend the 2 shots digitally to get correct exposure for both the moon and the surrounding.

If there is a clear separation between the moon and the surrounding, you might want to try using a graduated ND. Out the grey side over the moon to reduce its brightness.

If you are just taking the moon in the sky, then you will need to just spot meter on the moon.

- Roy
 

#9
Originally posted by mpenza
with spot metering, there shouldn't be a need to compensate EV right? unless the spot meter is inaccurate. I used a 2 year-old consumer digicam and could get proper exposure of the moon with the spot meter.
Actually, it depends. If you spot meter a middle gray area, no compensation is needed. If you spot a black area, you need to -2. If you spot a white area (e.g. snow), you need +2.

Regards
CK
 

mervlam

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#10
why so complicated?? why so cheem?

in the good old days without spotmeter in cameras, we use the sunny 16 rule. that's because the moon is sunlit.

for a full moon, use f/16 and shutter speed at 1/ISO
for half moon, use f/8 instead.
 

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