Purple haze on corners


Sep 27, 2015
69
0
6
#1
Hi all,

I'm using D700 with Nikon 24-70 f2.8, photos were shot with ISO 25600.
Went to Night safari to shoot last week, realised most of my photos had purple haze at the corners.

Was it due to the High ISO I used?
When PP-ing in Lightroom, when I selected Lens correction -> "Enable Profile Corrections", it was more obvious.

Here's the pic for reference.


Hope someone can help. Thanks in advance!
 

darrrrrrrrrr

Senior Member
Sep 19, 2006
3,209
5
38
30
Singapore
#2
Hi all,

I'm using D700 with Nikon 24-70 f2.8, photos were shot with ISO 25600.
Went to Night safari to shoot last week, realised most of my photos had purple haze at the corners.

Was it due to the High ISO I used?
When PP-ing in Lightroom, when I selected Lens correction -> "Enable Profile Corrections", it was more obvious.

Here's the pic for reference.

Hope someone can help. Thanks in advance!
Purple cast is due to the high ISO noise or pushing exposure/shadows too much. 25600 is really high esp for old first-gen FX camera like D3/D700.

Lenses will have vignetting - darker corners than central area. Turning on profile correction in LR will brighten the corners to correct vignetting. So the corners become more purple.

Can reduce luminance and saturation of purple to hide it a bit. But otherwise, need to lower ISO using faster lens, or upgrade your camera.
 

thoongeng

Senior Member
Jan 26, 2010
1,274
19
38
#3
Yes most likely from the high ISO, maybe contributed by flare from left side lamps

When you 'enable profile correction', lightroom will remove the vignetting at the corners thus brightening them and make the noise more obvious
 

Sep 27, 2015
69
0
6
#4
Purple cast is due to the high ISO noise or pushing exposure/shadows too much. 25600 is really high esp for old first-gen FX camera like D3/D700.

Lenses will have vignetting - darker corners than central area. Turning on profile correction in LR will brighten the corners to correct vignetting. So the corners become more purple.

Can reduce luminance and saturation of purple to hide it a bit. But otherwise, need to lower ISO using faster lens, or upgrade your camera.
Oic. Yeah i did push shadows to 100 and highlights to -100 in order to get details better. Should i do that? Still a newbie in PP.

Yeap i did reduce saturation and it isnt that obvious anymore!

By faster lens did you mean lower aperture lens?

Thanks so much for your help!
 

Sep 27, 2015
69
0
6
#5
Yes most likely from the high ISO, maybe contributed by flare from left side lamps

When you 'enable profile correction', lightroom will remove the vignetting at the corners thus brightening them and make the noise more obvious
Oic. Havent shot on such high ISO but had to do so to compensate the shutter speed i wanted haha.

Thank you so much!!
 

darrrrrrrrrr

Senior Member
Sep 19, 2006
3,209
5
38
30
Singapore
#6
Oic. Yeah i did push shadows to 100 and highlights to -100 in order to get details better. Should i do that? Still a newbie in PP.

Yeap i did reduce saturation and it isnt that obvious anymore!

By faster lens did you mean lower aperture lens?

Thanks so much for your help!
Pushing shadows & lowering highlights is one way to compress the dynamic range, but 100 is very extreme and can introduce a lot of noise in the shadow area or halos (where the fringe tones become weird) or posterisation (subtle gradation of colours become harshly-defined chunks). I'd be less aggressive with the PP, especially for older cameras where dynamic range is lower and high ISO is poorer.

Yes, faster lens a lower aperture number. e.g. 200mm f/2, 85mm f/1.4
 

Octarine

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
12,538
33
48
Pasir Ris
#7
Another good example for leaving the camera at home and just enjoy the night safari.
Honestly, this blur 'noise collection' is nothing I would spend time and efforts on.
 

thoongeng

Senior Member
Jan 26, 2010
1,274
19
38
#8
Haven't shot at night safari before, but heard it's really challenging though can still be done... one of the few situation where equipment counts (with good technique of course) hehe
 

catchlights

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 27, 2004
21,903
46
48
Punggol, Singapore
www.foto-u.com
#9
I Had seen the professional photographer shot the photos that the Night Safari uses for their brochures and promotional material, that Ang Moh photographer is specialise in wild life photography, but I can't tell you how he do it.

all I can tell you there is no way to shoot the same kind of photos like what you see on the Night Safari brochures, so don't bother to try. keep your camera and enjoy your night in the Zoo.
 

Sep 27, 2015
69
0
6
#10
Pushing shadows & lowering highlights is one way to compress the dynamic range, but 100 is very extreme and can introduce a lot of noise in the shadow area or halos (where the fringe tones become weird) or posterisation (subtle gradation of colours become harshly-defined chunks). I'd be less aggressive with the PP, especially for older cameras where dynamic range is lower and high ISO is poorer.

Yes, faster lens a lower aperture number. e.g. 200mm f/2, 85mm f/1.4
Oic. I just realise after this situation of mine that, dynamic range gets smaller as the ISO goes up. Haha, guess its due to experience that you learn something.

Thanks so much bro!
 

Sep 27, 2015
69
0
6
#11
Another good example for leaving the camera at home and just enjoy the night safari.
Honestly, this blur 'noise collection' is nothing I would spend time and efforts on.
Right, just wanted to try Night photography as a newbie.
 

Sep 27, 2015
69
0
6
#12
Haven't shot at night safari before, but heard it's really challenging though can still be done... one of the few situation where equipment counts (with good technique of course) hehe
:D i think on the tram its almost impossible to get a good shot. Equipment counts of cos, but sometimes just gotta make do with what we have ah. Hahaha
 

Sep 27, 2015
69
0
6
#13
I Had seen the professional photographer shot the photos that the Night Safari uses for their brochures and promotional material, that Ang Moh photographer is specialise in wild life photography, but I can't tell you how he do it.

all I can tell you there is no way to shoot the same kind of photos like what you see on the Night Safari brochures, so don't bother to try. keep your camera and enjoy your night in the Zoo.
Oic. Haha. Not wanting to get the same quality of photos as those on the Night Safari brochure la. Just trying my hands on new stuffs.
 

thoongeng

Senior Member
Jan 26, 2010
1,274
19
38
#14
:D i think on the tram its almost impossible to get a good shot. Equipment counts of cos, but sometimes just gotta make do with what we have ah. Hahaha
On stable ground already difficult to get a shot, let alone on the move ;)

I think it is a good exercise to test the limits of your equipment so you know how to work around it or when it is time to put your camera down and just enjoy the moment (as the seniors have advised).

This is an example of someone who shot at the Night Safari without setting up like the paid professional for the brochures (has exif data, can scroll a few images before and after)
https://www.flickr.com/photos/andrewjktan/19397563505/in/album-72157648334364193/
 

Sep 27, 2015
69
0
6
#15
On stable ground already difficult to get a shot, let alone on the move ;)

I think it is a good exercise to test the limits of your equipment so you know how to work around it or when it is time to put your camera down and just enjoy the moment (as the seniors have advised).

This is an example of someone who shot at the Night Safari without setting up like the paid professional for the brochures (has exif data, can scroll a few images before and after)
https://www.flickr.com/photos/andrewjktan/19397563505/in/album-72157648334364193/
Oo. He used monopod for all shots. Haha. I was enjoying the time spent w my family too. So we wanted to move on quickly between each animal to finish seeing the whole park, therefore i didnt set up tripod and stuff. :p

Flickr really allows you to learn how good photogs shoots by seeing the exif data man. Hahaha
 

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