Prosumers or DSLR?


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Zaknafein

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Oct 29, 2005
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#1
considering the price of new entry-level DSLRs which is just a few hundreds more than prosumer cameras, would anyone still buy prosumer cameras?
although for DSLR, still gotta buy lens, filters etc, but the quality of pictures are a lot higher right?
 

rebbot

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Mar 24, 2005
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#2
Zaknafein said:
considering the price of new entry-level DSLRs which is just a few hundreds more than prosumer cameras, would anyone still buy prosumer cameras?
although for DSLR, still gotta buy lens, filters etc, but the quality of pictures are a lot higher right?
its all about the photographer and being there at the right time and not about the equipment used.
 

shyanyap

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Dec 19, 2005
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#4
Zaknafein said:
considering the price of new entry-level DSLRs which is just a few hundreds more than prosumer cameras, would anyone still buy prosumer cameras?
although for DSLR, still gotta buy lens, filters etc, but the quality of pictures are a lot higher right?
Your equipment DOES NOT affect the quality of your image. The right equipment just makes it easier, faster or more convenient.

You are far better off worrying about how to use what you already own to make great photos.

Do checkout these two articles
Why Your Camera Does Not Matter
Alex Majoli points and shoots

:cool:
 

Clockunder

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Apr 12, 2005
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#5
Zaknafein said:
considering the price of new entry-level DSLRs which is just a few hundreds more than prosumer cameras, would anyone still buy prosumer cameras?
although for DSLR, still gotta buy lens, filters etc, but the quality of pictures are a lot higher right?
Prosumer camera + accessories = about $1K-$1.5K

Entry level DSLR + some reasonable lenses + accessories = $2.5K-$3K

Quality of picture in DSLR depends alot on lenses but are mostly better than Prosumer cameras.

Actual price difference is actually much more than what most newbies think initially.

Let's put it this way : If the camera doesn't really matter, then you won't see anyone buying better cameras already and we would see the same quality picture taken by different cameras if taken by the same photographer. And also how don't those using DSLR now just buy a point and shoot cameras at just $500. Most photographers try to impress others by over-emphasizing the importance of skills over equipment.
 

lycan

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#6
Heheheh...as they say. You pay for what you get. I personally think that it's not really the camera but the photographer..... so you decide.

Zaknafein said:
considering the price of new entry-level DSLRs which is just a few hundreds more than prosumer cameras, would anyone still buy prosumer cameras?
although for DSLR, still gotta buy lens, filters etc, but the quality of pictures are a lot higher right?
 

solarii

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Oct 20, 2005
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#7
shyanyap said:
Your equipment DOES NOT affect the quality of your image. The right equipment just makes it easier, faster or more convenient.

You are far better off worrying about how to use what you already own to make great photos.

Do checkout these two articles
Why Your Camera Does Not Matter
Alex Majoli points and shoots

:cool:
I beg to differ. Equipment does affect the quality of your images. Try shooting at ISO 800 on a P&S, or comparing the images of an L lens with a budget lens. Its a matter of your needs and budget. Better stuff does make it easier, faster blah blah blah AND it yields better images, but it costs more.

That article you mentioned is meant for newbies to console them, and encourage them to go out and shoot. Newbies tend to obsess over equipment, since they lack the skill and experience necessary to get good photos. Many think expensive equipment is the secret to success. The article is trying to rationalize with them...

Its not wrong per se. Its just written to serve a noble purpose - helping newbies to improve by asking them to practice and shoot more and not blow their hard earned cash on stuff they're not ready to use. The easiest way to do this is to tell them that the PRO stuff's over rated.

Here's an analogy: If you tell a kid he's too young to do something, he'll insist he's old enough and probably try it behind your back. Tell him that that something's no fun and really sucks and he's more likely to just walk away.
 

obewan

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Feb 11, 2005
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#9
There will always be demand for different type of cameras.
Depends on how you define "quality of pictures".

A DSLR will normally yield better pictures under low light condition.
(Here quality refers to lower noise, sharper images if using better lens, nice bokeh effect etc.)

A prosumer cam will still help you to win in a photo competition.
(Here the quality is judged by the skill of the photographer.)

The most likely factor that will affect your choise is $$$.
Buy something you can comfortably afford.
So that next mth you don't have eat bread and drink plain water for breakfast, lunch and dinner. :bsmilie:
 

jOhO

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Apr 20, 2003
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#10
photographer skill aside:

a prosumer that costs almost as much as an entry level dslr has a huge zoom range (10x), most with anti-shake or VR, has a macro function, can take movies, live preview on LCD.

for a entry level dslr, u only get a kit lens which is usually only about 3x zoom, usually no VR or AS (except minolta?), no macro, and DEFINITELY no movies and live preview.

but of course as some have mentioned, with a dslr, u get better noise control, better resolution (not in terms of megapixel, but rather, sensor size), and flexibility to "upgrade", where u can get better/longer/wider lenses.
 

mastermind

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Dec 27, 2005
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#11
Prosumers and DSLR each have their own advantages and they are not meant to replace each other but to complement each other.

I think many people pointed out the selling points for DSLR but they forget the pros for prosumers.

1.) Prosumers are lighter and easier to use. Which camera would you bring for your holidays that combines reasonable quality and portability?

2.) Many DSLR users laugh at the shutter lag of non-DSLR users. But if the DSLR did not have their lens fixed and ready to capture. They are not better off with "lens lag" if they see something worth taking down but needed to get the right lens out in order to get the perfect picture. But for prosumer wise, you just start up, point and shoot and you may catch the unexpected scene quickly.

3.) You can trust your prosumer to your g/f or 10 year old child to take a decent pictures but you can't leave your DSLR with them and expect a miracle. This is because a prosumer is built with functions for both the newbies and the experienced photographer.

Really, the more sensible users will not tell you to get the DSLR over the prosumer or vice versa. It depends on what you want (quality or versatility), what you can do (your skills with both a camera and photoshop for post-processing) with your camera. There will be a market for prosumers and a market for DSLR until the day either prosumers produce quality better than DSLR or DSLR become more versatile than prosumers.
 

#12
A crap photographer will take crap images on a point and shoot and crap images on a DSLR, a good photographer will be able to use both to produce good images, its not all about equipment, if your rubbish with a d70, a d2x wont make u any better

Just my opinion
 

yyD70S

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Dec 25, 2005
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#13
Zad,

If you have not already done so, go ahead and hit your first DSLR. You won't regret it. (I'm assuming you are not paying by instalments!)
 

Clockunder

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Apr 12, 2005
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#14
wildstallion said:
A crap photographer will take crap images on a point and shoot and crap images on a DSLR, a good photographer will be able to use both to produce good images, its not all about equipment, if your rubbish with a d70, a d2x wont make u any better

Just my opinion
Agree but that's only half the story.

The other side of the story is that it's also not all about photographer. The same photographer under the same light condition and same situation will produce different picture quality with different cameras.
 

Caofei

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Sep 7, 2005
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#15
I am just upgraded from prosumer DC and purchase my first DSLR Canon 350D, with the kit lens i am very satisfied with the image quality and the great DOF.
Bottom line if your hobby in photography get DSLR, cos more room for learning, but you have to patient for more practices and PP, after some tweaking your image become amazing.
About the $$$ to spend, i think you have to control yourself, dont too keen on L lens or other ex stuff, just stick in your mind that the overall image quality from the kit lens better than prosumer DC.
About the size i dont think the DSLR (350D) bigger then Fuji S9500.


Cheers,
Caofei

Cheers,
Caofei
 

Dec 26, 2005
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Yew Tee
#16
It is depend on the Photographer Itself !!!
I have seen a photographer shooting with the Old Coolpix 5700
the image quality itself is as good as High End DSLR i.e. D2X
I could not even tell the difference !!!

So, It is depend on the Photografer Itself
Equipment Gear will just make your shoot easier & Faster
Also more Convenient !!!
Normally you only use DSLR for a very tough & demanding photoshoot assigment :D
 

Caofei

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Sep 7, 2005
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#17
I agree with you, but remember the tehcnology have its limit, the big cmos sensor of DSLR and PS cam is diff, lets say the same photographer but use diff type of camera (DSLR and PS), I doubt it will produce same images quality from these two camera....dont to mention in under low light condition.

Cheers,
Caofei
 

Clockunder

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Apr 12, 2005
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#18
stprmit said:
It is depend on the Photographer Itself !!!
I have seen a photographer shooting with the Old Coolpix 5700
the image quality itself is as good as High End DSLR i.e. D2X
I could not even tell the difference !!!

So, It is depend on the Photografer Itself
Equipment Gear will just make your shoot easier & Faster
Also more Convenient !!!
Normally you only use DSLR for a very tough & demanding photoshoot assigment :D
Ample light, the Nikon Coolpix 5700 has no problem.

When it comes to challenging light condition, it's when the difference between prosumer cameras and DSLRs tells.

I'm currently using the Coolpix 5700 and I know when it can make it and when it can't make it. If you happen to see that the 5700 can make it, it doesn't mean that it can always make it.

The main difference lies in the size of the image sensor. Cameras with less than APS-sized sensor have noise problems, especially when the light is dim. The noise level of DSLRs at ISO 400 and 800 is still ok but not so with prosumer cameras. In most dim light situations, you may need to avoid too slow shutter speed in order to get the effects you want. However, if you're using a prosumer camera instead of a DSLR with a fast lens, you will find that after you've pushed the ISO to 400 or 800 and yet the shutter speed is still too slow despite using the largest aperture. This is not to mention that prosumer camera in most situation can't achieve the shallow Depth of Field that DSLRs can produce and there is too much noise at ISO 400 or 800. After you remove the noise by software, the picture's clearity and details suffer.
 

Clockunder

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Apr 12, 2005
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#19
I think the best evidence to support what I say is the sample photos at various camera review sites.

Similar photos of the same scenery are taken by the same professional reviewer using different cameras but you can see the difference in picture quality. Although light conditions are not exactly the same, they still give an indication of the differences.

There is no doubt that you need to be a good photographer to have good photographs but under certain situations, even a good photographer can't get good photos if he lacks the appropriate equipment.

To say that it all depends on the photographer is arguing against the obvious and against common sense.
 

Caofei

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Sep 7, 2005
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#20
Well said:thumbsup:

Cheers,
Caofei

Clockunder said:
I think the best evidence to support what I say is the sample photos at various camera review sites.

Similar photos of the same scenery are taken by the same professional reviewer using different cameras but you can see the difference in picture quality. Although light conditions are not exactly the same, they still give an indication of the differences.

There is no doubt that you need to be a good photographer to have good photographs but under certain situations, even a good photographer can't get good photos if he lacks the appropriate equipment.

To say that it all depends on the photographer is arguing against the obvious and against common sense.
 

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