Product Photography


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cocoon

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Apr 4, 2006
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#1
Hi ppl,

I'm a complete newbie and i use a Olympus 5060 to take pics of apparels i put up for sale on the internet. the problem is the lighting on the pic is not evenly distributed, some areas too dark and white coloured apparel appearing very dull and dark. i can't get the kind of results which i normally see on websites which sell apparels. i've tried shooting in the day with room lights on, windows fully opened, placing the apparel near the window and using a table lamp to project more light onto the object but i still can't get the desired results. any suggestions? thanks
 

hanafi

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Sep 8, 2004
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#2
If using artificial light, you need to have 2 lights or 4 lights spread evenly on each side. Measure with a light meeter. If that is too difficult, go outdoors and find a shaded area but not dark ie, as long as not direct at t the sun. There the light will be bright and even.
 

#3
use the 5060 to take a metering of a grey card sited over where the clothes will be. remember the setting and put it in on manual mode. your lighting should come from behind you; and slightly to the left or right for shadow details.

if u want your whites, white increase your exposure by abt 1/3 to 1/2 stop.

do a white balance check. this helps a lot.
 

cocoon

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Apr 4, 2006
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#4
thank you for all the replies. i'm sorry, but can i know how do i take metering with my 5060? can you explain to me or provide me links which i can go read up?

regarding the artificial lights, will a combination of table lamp and ceiling mounted fluorescent lamp suffice? BTW, i don't have a light meter and i'm using the built in flash on the camera.

thanks!:)
 

sORe-EyEz

Senior Member
Jun 28, 2005
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SGee
#5
if u got not enough light sourse, try using mirrors or any reflective surface 2 brighten up ur items. ;p

. mirrors
. reflective car shades

mayb try increase exposure? :dunno:
 

#6
IIRC, the CD that came with the 5060 has the full operating manual in it. It is different from the physical instruction booklet that is given. More detailed and more in-depth.

get in close and fill your camera with a neutral part of the product and press the shutter half-way. be careful of shadows. it'll give u an exposure reading of 1/x shutter speed and fx aperature. change to manual mode and input this setting. recompose and shoot.
 

cocoon

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Apr 4, 2006
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#7
bowwow said:
IIRC, the CD that came with the 5060 has the full operating manual in it. It is different from the physical instruction booklet that is given. More detailed and more in-depth.

get in close and fill your camera with a neutral part of the product and press the shutter half-way. be careful of shadows. it'll give u an exposure reading of 1/x shutter speed and fx aperature. change to manual mode and input this setting. recompose and shoot.
confirmed. i found the operating manual in PDF format in the CD, it is definitely more detailed than the hardcopy. thanks for the heads up , i'll spend some time to read through it. :)
 

solarii

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Oct 20, 2005
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Bt. Timah
#8
cocoon said:
Hi ppl,

I'm a complete newbie and i use a Olympus 5060 to take pics of apparels i put up for sale on the internet. the problem is the lighting on the pic is not evenly distributed, some areas too dark and white coloured apparel appearing very dull and dark. i can't get the kind of results which i normally see on websites which sell apparels. i've tried shooting in the day with room lights on, windows fully opened, placing the apparel near the window and using a table lamp to project more light onto the object but i still can't get the desired results. any suggestions? thanks
Its not easy to replicate what you see on the websites. Even a simple apparel shoot can involve 2-4 studio strobes, reflectors etc. So don't compare yr results to theirs and feel disappointed. If anyone with little/no experience and a PnS can produce professional results, the pros would be out of business. Not trying to discourage you or anything, but end of the day, there is a limit to what you can achieve with yr set up.

If you need the shots fast, try posting up a TFCD request. I'm sure some people will be interested in expanding their portfolio. Else you'll have to make do the best you can. Lighting techniques for product shots is a specialised field that requires training, experience, and proper equipment for good results. You can't buy a picanto and expect it to perfrom like a porsche, or a BMW.
 

Del_CtrlnoAlt

Senior Member
Feb 15, 2003
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#9
newbie suggestions here... but 1st, newbie ask things ok?

you trying to take the apparels folded or hang on a manequin, or just on a hook by the wall?

cos if its folded, its rather easy with just lamps, if you are having it on manequin, its harder... esp a long dress... imho, i think you need more than just 1 table light.

anyway, i've got 2 newbie options for you, 1 is use a tripod, another get 1 big reflector.

option 1, use ambient light, if your room is using normal fluorescene light, mount camera to tripod then just set to manual, 1/25 or slightly lower, aperture about f5.6 to f8, leave a distance between the wall & apparel, then shoot. use a off camera trigger if possible.

option 2, find all the lights you have at home, place the lights on 1 vertical plane, facing 90 degrees to to apparel, place a big reflector opp the lights, but tilt 45 degree to the apparel, make sure it shines on the apparrel.
 

Del_CtrlnoAlt

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Feb 15, 2003
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#10
solarii said:
Its not easy to replicate what you see on the websites. Even a simple apparel shoot can involve 2-4 studio strobes, reflectors etc. So don't compare yr results to theirs and feel disappointed. If anyone with little/no experience and a PnS can produce professional results, the pros would be out of business. Not trying to discourage you or anything, but end of the day, there is a limit to what you can achieve with yr set up.

If you need the shots fast, try posting up a TFCD request. I'm sure some people will be interested in expanding their portfolio. Else you'll have to make do the best you can. Lighting techniques for product shots is a specialised field that requires training, experience, and proper equipment for good results. You can't buy a picanto and expect it to perfrom like a porsche, or a BMW.
agree 1/2 and disagree 1/2... :devil:

its hard to replicate, previously thought product shoot is bloody simple, and an F717 can do it, but it can't den thought F828 can do it, also cannot... then bought DSLR, finally some results...

on the TFCD part, i think if any body pull this stunt again will be shot immediately, better not try... unless the poster is a chio bu, then put a big sexy picture, sure alot of ppl will help... me too... esp if the poster is going to wear the apparel, i even rent studio lor... :devil:
 

cocoon

New Member
Apr 4, 2006
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#12
can i get grey card at any camera shops? what is the term i should use when i tell the staff what i want? btw, how much does it cost? thanks
 

solarii

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Oct 20, 2005
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#13
cocoon said:
can i get grey card at any camera shops? what is the term i should use when i tell the staff what i want? btw, how much does it cost? thanks
Yes you can. Tell them u want a grey ards loh... :) U want to be technical its an 18% grey card. If any photography store looks at you blankly when u ask for a grey card, just walk out. They don't know their ass from their oesophagus. ;)

Costs? Depends on how pro u wanna get. Range from $20 to as much as $100+ for a professional colour checker chart (which u don't need unless u do commerical work or happen to do equipment tests).

But I'll share with you this tip: A lot of good photography books come with a grey card attached behind. Its good enough for everyday use, plus u get the book. They cost slightly more than buying just the card, but hey consider the value.

Good book + card, or just card? A lot of photographic equipment is over-priced and over-kill for everyday use. Have to be smart and look for better value items that serves your needs.
 

cocoon

New Member
Apr 4, 2006
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#14
solarii said:
Yes you can. Tell them u want a grey ards loh... :) U want to be technical its an 18% grey card. If any photography store looks at you blankly when u ask for a grey card, just walk out. They don't know their ass from their oesophagus. ;)

Costs? Depends on how pro u wanna get. Range from $20 to as much as $100+ for a professional colour checker chart (which u don't need unless u do commerical work or happen to do equipment tests).

But I'll share with you this tip: A lot of good photography books come with a grey card attached behind. Its good enough for everyday use, plus u get the book. They cost slightly more than buying just the card, but hey consider the value.

Good book + card, or just card? A lot of photographic equipment is over-priced and over-kill for everyday use. Have to be smart and look for better value items that serves your needs.
thanks for the info and tip. :D
 

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