Problem with my shots


ikelvin

New Member
Feb 18, 2010
126
0
0
Tamah Jurong
#1
Hi all !

i have been facing some over exposure issue but i dunno is it (Attached 4 photos)

- my problem
-Len problem
- Camera problem
- filter problem


Over exposure at the top half, lower half is in shaqe wheras upper half is under sunlight.
how do i take a well expose photo in this kind of situation ?



Is the sky over expose or is it my problem ? :confused:


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Today i did a test to see the differences with and without the filter however i find the colour seems to be slighty better without the filter, lastly same issues overexpose sky


With Filter [ Hoya77mm UV(0) ]


Without Filter


better UV filter will have better colour mah ?
 

Last edited:

Diavonex

Senior Member
Sep 23, 2008
3,641
0
0
Admiralty
#2
Suggest you take 2 pictures instead of one.

One shot of the bright side and one of the dark side.



 

Octarine

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
12,491
26
48
Pasir Ris
#3
better UV filter will have better colour mah ?
An UV filter is not supposed to affect the colours at all, the filter is supposed to cut off only the invisible UV portion of light. Not sure how well-coated the UV(0) filters are, but Hoya is among the recommended brands here. Alternatively, get a lens hood and skip the filter. Lenses are built to work without any filter. Colours can also be adjusted in post-processing.

As for the overexposed sky in pic #2: nothing much you can do. Similar to picture one: the dynamic range of the scene is wider than what the sensor can capture. Decide what is important in your composition. If the sky is not important then reduce the amount in the frame and let it be overexposed. No harm done if the viewer is drawn to the main object which is well exposed. Read up about metering modes, try in a stationary scene how different metering modes affect the exposure (use P or A mode). Use a tripod in order to have a fixed frame.
Pic #1 is also not well composed. With different angles you can overcome the exposure problem. Get away from the idea to capture everything in one pic.
 

ikelvin

New Member
Feb 18, 2010
126
0
0
Tamah Jurong
#4
An UV filter is not supposed to affect the colours at all, the filter is supposed to cut off only the invisible UV portion of light. Not sure how well-coated the UV(0) filters are, but Hoya is among the recommended brands here. Alternatively, get a lens hood and skip the filter. Lenses are built to work without any filter. Colours can also be adjusted in post-processing.

As for the overexposed sky in pic #2: nothing much you can do. Similar to picture one: the dynamic range of the scene is wider than what the sensor can capture. Decide what is important in your composition. If the sky is not important then reduce the amount in the frame and let it be overexposed. No harm done if the viewer is drawn to the main object which is well exposed. Read up about metering modes, try in a stationary scene how different metering modes affect the exposure (use P or A mode). Use a tripod in order to have a fixed frame.
Pic #1 is also not well composed. With different angles you can overcome the exposure problem. Get away from the idea to capture everything in one pic.
ok noted with thanks :heart:
 

jsprtan

New Member
May 12, 2010
416
0
0
CEntral
#5
There is no problem with the u or the camera system, cause it is the limitation of the camera. The camera will try to provide u the best setting for the area of your interest so if ur focus is on the darker side it will result in having the brighter side to be over expose. As the darker side need more exposure time for the enough light to fall on the sensor and by that time the brighter side will be overexpose.

To overcome this u can try doing a HDR photo instead, this will result in a more balance exposure for the overall photo.
 

bonnie17

New Member
Jul 3, 2010
16
0
0
#6
i encounter that before if you want to have a visible sky or cloud i just did is that i increase my f then just pop some flash for the primary object and lessen some iso
 

kutten

New Member
May 12, 2008
293
0
0
East
#7
Photo 1 - take metering at the far end to ensure no blown highlight (if you are not familiar with the manual mode spot metering, it is ok to use other modes but check the histogram to make sure the highlight is not blown off) , but this will result in foreground to be under exposed. Then use daylight fill flash to fill in the shadow of the foreground. Again, adjust flash power and check histogram to ensure no blocked shadow.

Photo 2 - Bro Octarine already explained that. Or you can PP to add in a blue sky.


Photo 3 and 4 are overexposed, you can't even see the right edge of the building. Did you check your histogram ???

Most of photos are taken around 3-5pm, try some in the morning before 11am to see whether it makes any different.
 

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daredevil123

Moderator
Staff member
Oct 25, 2005
21,645
63
48
lil red dot
#8
TS, it is no one's problem. You just need to understand exposure better, and how to control it. You can start by using the EV compensation dial.
 

ZerocoolAstra

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2008
9,522
0
0
rainy Singapore
#9
TS, it is no one's problem. You just need to understand exposure better, and how to control it. You can start by using the EV compensation dial.
It's TS' problem... coz it's caused by a lack of understanding of light (quality, colour, angle, intensity) and exposure. hehehehe... :bsmilie:
 

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