Presenting SEIKO Fine Watches


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kyo86sg

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SEIKO has been a fine watch maker since 1924 and little did we know that Seiko is actually a Japanese word meaning "exquisite," "minute," or "success." This image is captured to remember and showcase of SEIKO Precision Fine Chronograph Watches for the past decade.
 

Jul 14, 2007
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#2
...what exactly you had wanted us to comment on..? As a product shot?
 

kyo86sg

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#3
...what exactly you had wanted us to comment on..? As a product shot?
Well i am not sure if it qualifies as a product shot. But maybe give some feedback on the overall image? Thanksz. :)
 

foxtwo

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#4
Probably should have diffused the light more and provided more fill with bounce, try to leave minimal shadow. The idea of metal is cool and smooth.
Blow/Dust off particles and give the product a good buffing prior to shoot. Arrange by using gloves or anything just not barehanded, then blow off again. In fact blow off before every shot, else deal with it in PS.
Framing looks a little awkward especially at the top where it gets busy, time face is the important focus point here. Consider inserting a contrasting velvet/felt cloth (usually black, but feel free to experiment) through the product instead.
 

metalgear

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Aug 11, 2003
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#5
fox two, for shot like this how many light sources and bounces would you recommend ?
 

foxtwo

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#6
It can be as simple as one light, unless another is needed for background. Bounce materials can be white paper/board or a mirror (extremely bright & shiny bounce). Size of bounce card also matters. Don't limit it to A4 sizes when working with small items, sometimes it can be too big and you want fill to come in from a different direction. Steal/Beg/Borrow small makeup mirror(s) from your sister or gf.
Flags also play a part when required, limit light fall if required, probably from background light. No one can say how many lights or bounces you need, since no one shoots the same way, or shares the same creative direction. People should be wary of photographing smaller objects, it's often just as hard or harder to light well.
 

gremlin

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#7
I would choose a higher end specimen of Seiko to photograph since your image is titled Seiko "Fine" watches :)
 

kyo86sg

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#8
I would choose a higher end specimen of Seiko to photograph since your image is titled Seiko "Fine" watches :)
Haha will take note, of that. ;) Thanks anyway!
 

kyo86sg

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Sep 16, 2006
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#9
Probably should have diffused the light more and provided more fill with bounce, try to leave minimal shadow. The idea of metal is cool and smooth.
Blow/Dust off particles and give the product a good buffing prior to shoot. Arrange by using gloves or anything just not barehanded, then blow off again. In fact blow off before every shot, else deal with it in PS.
Framing looks a little awkward especially at the top where it gets busy, time face is the important focus point here. Consider inserting a contrasting velvet/felt cloth (usually black, but feel free to experiment) through the product instead.
Hmmm, guess i did miss out small and little details like this. Thanks for ur advice! Will try to do that to my other bunch of watches. :)
 

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