Polarizing Filter


Status
Not open for further replies.

winzee

New Member
Apr 17, 2008
141
0
0
33
#1
Hey guys

i'm using a HOYA 67mm UV(O) filter..
is it a polarizing filter?
I bought my D90 and Richard at TK fixed this for me..

ANy good filters with or without polarizing effect to recommend?

Thanks in advance!
 

winzee

New Member
Apr 17, 2008
141
0
0
33
#3
HOYA 67mm UV(O) filter.. is not a polarizing filter, is UV filter

this is a polarizing filter



and this is how polarizing filter works.

hope this help.


haha thanks!! =)

hmm!
I'm going europe for 7 months (Winter + Summer).. any filters to recommend?
or should i just use the one i'm using now..
i read that polarizing is very important?

thanks!!
 

Last edited:

erictan8888

Senior Member
Nov 9, 2004
2,883
1
0
Singapore
#4
if you know what a polariser can do, then it is very important...
cause you really need to understand how to use this filter before you start using it...
else the effect is not achieved...

if you have the time to take your pics, which i assume you have, since you will be there for 7 months,
the circular polariser is a very useful investment... just be sure to get the best your money can buy...
 

mcn

New Member
Oct 6, 2005
1,265
0
0
#5
haha thanks!! =)

hmm!
I'm going europe for 7 months (Winter + Summer).. any filters to recommend?
or should i just use the one i'm using now..
i read that polarizing is very important?

thanks!!
7 months europe is good... happy for you
 

winzee

New Member
Apr 17, 2008
141
0
0
33
#6
if you know what a polariser can do, then it is very important...
cause you really need to understand how to use this filter before you start using it...
else the effect is not achieved...

if you have the time to take your pics, which i assume you have, since you will be there for 7 months,
the circular polariser is a very useful investment... just be sure to get the best your money can buy...
the Hoya Circular Polarizer?
There's 3 from Hoya
1) Pro1D
2) PL/PL-Cir
3) UV-PL-Cir

or B&W B+W MRC CPL


Which one ah?
 

Last edited:

Reportage

Senior Member
Nov 24, 2008
5,785
2
0
#7
just understand that if your lens rotate while focusing or zooming, you have to compensate as well on the CPL. Some cases the photographer never notice and their relatively expensive CPL dropped off and got chipped/broken/scratched.
 

Reportage

Senior Member
Nov 24, 2008
5,785
2
0
#8
pardon me for my ignorance (i'm noob..)
how do i compensate it? can't find any information other than turning it??
Cokin if feeling itchy or Tian Ya filter system if budget constraints. Search about them.
 

winzee

New Member
Apr 17, 2008
141
0
0
33
#9
just understand that if your lens rotate while focusing or zooming, you have to compensate as well on the CPL. Some cases the photographer never notice and their relatively expensive CPL dropped off and got chipped/broken/scratched.
oh no
i didn't think of this
hmm..

so i have to focus, and rotate the cpl then take pic?
it's quite mafan?
 

Last edited:

aryanto

New Member
Feb 16, 2005
1,799
0
0
singapore
#10
oh no
i didn't think of this
hmm..

so i have to focus, and rotate the cpl then take pic?
it's quite mafan?
Photography is marfan lah. :sweat:
If you dont want marfan then be a model and dont hold the camera.
Also can blame the other guy if the picture does not turn out good. better deal right? :sweatsm:
 

Reportage

Senior Member
Nov 24, 2008
5,785
2
0
#11
Photography is marfan lah. :sweat:
If you dont want marfan then be a model and dont hold the camera.
Also can blame the other guy if the picture does not turn out good. better deal right? :sweatsm:
actually you are right on the ball with the remark....for critical occassions and have no idea how to max the camera performance, best to hire a Pro. Friends doing for kopi money and professionals doing for living with similar setup i notice the quality can be as different as night and day.
 

Blur Shadow

Senior Member
Sep 17, 2005
4,886
4
0
#12
A little bit of work for a little bit of results... Go figure.
 

Atarandas

Senior Member
Aug 19, 2008
2,134
1
0
#13
oh no
i didn't think of this
hmm..

so i have to focus, and rotate the cpl then take pic?
it's quite mafan?
Hi hi ,

Actually not that mafan. I dont think you need to check ur filter every time u take a shot perhaps , you just make it a point to check that the filter is screw tight . I know most filters comes with a movable ring at the front to allow for lens rotation , that would relief some of the friction caused.

Polarizing filter is like what the 3M polarizing lamp does , it reduces the glare and reflections and enhance color saturation , for eg , u shoot at the blue sky , with a polarizer , you will see a deeper and more saturated blue. You shoot at the water bodies , the reflection will be greatly reduced . Hence, its a favored filter for landscape shooting.

Another thing to take note is that when choosing polarizer for Digital SLR , you need to ensure its Circular Polarizer , else your meter will not give you the correct exposure reading with the filter on. You can do a quick check on google to know in details whats the difference =)
 

akagi07

Senior Member
Apr 6, 2006
1,464
0
36
#14
a question:
a polarized filter for blue blue sky and clear water with no reflection.
how abt sunset shot? simply just wait for the perfect timing and shoot?
any particular filter required? I'm super demoralised just cant take a good shot of the sky when I'm near the coast. everything jus look white and i reduce my aperture, and increase the shutter..
i cant c the cloud.

but coming to the point, i'm using the kit at diameter 62mm if not wrong, i was thinking if a polarizing is a good investment now or wasted if i upgrade to a high telezoom len like 18-200 which is diameter 67mm

i'm still more puzzled on how to take the above, clear blue sky shot and a sunset shot with shots of beautiful sun rays.. been reading up.
 

ahbian

Senior Member
May 23, 2006
2,467
0
0
#15
A polarizer works best when the sun is perpendicular to your lens, so shooting a sunset head-on means it works more like a ND filter.

There are a wealth of information on shooting sunsets on the internet, if anything, a graduated neutral density (or better still a reverse graduated neutral density) filter would be more help than a polarizer.
 

Aug 8, 2008
605
0
0
Singapore
#16
a question:
a polarized filter for blue blue sky and clear water with no reflection.
how abt sunset shot? simply just wait for the perfect timing and shoot?
any particular filter required? I'm super demoralised just cant take a good shot of the sky when I'm near the coast. everything jus look white and i reduce my aperture, and increase the shutter..
i cant c the cloud.

but coming to the point, i'm using the kit at diameter 62mm if not wrong, i was thinking if a polarizing is a good investment now or wasted if i upgrade to a high telezoom len like 18-200 which is diameter 67mm

i'm still more puzzled on how to take the above, clear blue sky shot and a sunset shot with shots of beautiful sun rays.. been reading up.
Hi. Seems like you're pretty new to this hobby. You must read up more on this CPL stuff - the Net has loads of informative resources on it, otherwise, almost any book would have discussed this somehow.

CPL is almost must for landscape photography. Skies bluer, grass greener, water less reflective...etc. Esp, on the cutting of water/glass reflection, the CPL can do what Photoshop can't. Buy a good one and it'll last you a while if you're planning to advance in this hobby. Nothing is wasted...if you know what CPL can do, you'll probably buy one for every lens you have!

Final note - CPL works wonders in temperate climate (you may not notice too much here in the tropics). So I bet that if you can use it well, your photos will turn out stunning. No time to waste...read up, buy one, try out, practice and good luck with your trip!
 

erictan8888

Senior Member
Nov 9, 2004
2,883
1
0
Singapore
#17
the effect of the polariser is very much worth the effort...
once you see how well and beautiful the polariser makes the pic, you will really feel good that you had used the polariser...
it is very difficult to get PS to bring out the effect of a polariser...
esp reflection...

some shots to show the effects of the CP:

the 2 pics are taken at the same spot, with and without CP:








 

akagi07

Senior Member
Apr 6, 2006
1,464
0
36
#18
yup i had read up plenty of online info on CPL .. other than that, is timing a key to grab the color of nature (blue sky particularly in evening time?)
yes, just picked up a D90 in Oct. :)

then tried over few times to shoot sky and sunset, my pics almost gone case.. cant c the clouds else ended up with a darker image like B/W pic haha
 

Aug 8, 2008
605
0
0
Singapore
#19
yup i had read up plenty of online info on CPL .. other than that, is timing a key to grab the color of nature (blue sky particularly in evening time?)
yes, just picked up a D90 in Oct. :)

then tried over few times to shoot sky and sunset, my pics almost gone case.. cant c the clouds else ended up with a darker image like B/W pic haha
Yes, timing can be an issue to as to when CPL can be effective. I think over here CPL works best during mid-day when sun is strongest, i.e. when more light waves get scattered by the atmosphere, causing a wash-out sky.

The position of the sun is also a factor. CPL works best when your camera is pointed at 90 degress from the sun.

To see the effects of CPL, and to decide if you even need it on your camera, just hold the CPL in front of your eyes and look through it. You can then visualise if the CPL has any effect on the photo at all.

To add, I think your case is more of a common exposure problem. Meter for the sky and your foreground is blackened, and meter for the foreground and your sky is white-washed. Some solution for this is to use another kind of filter, the Neutral Density (ND), or lately, some like to do HDR...well, another subject too lengthy to be discussed here. One of the more difficult things in photography is to be able to set the correct exposure, and on this issue, more practice is definitely key.

No worries. All of us walked the same path before...stay cool. :)
 

Last edited:

pinholecam

Moderator
Staff member
Jul 23, 2007
10,929
84
48
#20
Polarizer is one of the trick post processing cannot really do. So its one of the remaining "must get" filters.

As mentioned before, in temperate climes, it makes their already blue skies even bluer :)


See how deep blue sky is?
No comparison shots, but imagine its about 3 grades lighter blue w/o the polarizer


Good luck w/ your stay. Wish I had the chance to be in Europe for even 2 weeks :D
 

Status
Not open for further replies.
Top Bottom