Pixel size matters?


Shafune

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#1
Hi guys! Happy new Year!

Here's a very noob question. Hopefully some bro's can un-noob me. :bsmilie:

I played with a friends canon 550D with 18-135 kit lens and the image is damn sharp and crisp. Using my sony A300 with Tamron 17-50 f2.8, The image isnt that sharp with details slightly blurred. The aperture and shutter speed is the same. No tripod though. The image is taken at the largest size.

Why is this so? Is it due to processor in the dslr? Or is it the lens? Or is it the size of the sensor?
 

Akatsuki

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#2
blurriness in most cases, i'm afraid to say, is probably due to user error. Pixel size (i assume u meant megapixel) is critical when you need to do heavy cropping or printing, and in this case, would never contribute to your blur pictures.
 

Atarandas

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Aug 19, 2008
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#3
Hi guys! Happy new Year!

Here's a very noob question. Hopefully some bro's can un-noob me. :bsmilie:

I played with a friends canon 550D with 18-135 kit lens and the image is damn sharp and crisp. Using my sony A300 with Tamron 17-50 f2.8, The image isnt that sharp with details slightly blurred. The aperture and shutter speed is the same. No tripod though. The image is taken at the largest size.

Why is this so? Is it due to processor in the dslr? Or is it the lens? Or is it the size of the sensor?
Unless you have pictures to show very difficult to tell. Plus are you viewing on the LCD on each camera respectively or viewing it on pc.

Too much variability to comment. Sharpness is a function of lens plus user related issues. A better way to test is to mount both cams on tripod that will eliminate human hand shake effects.

And is your base iso the same ?

The a300 is quite an old machine compared to 550d but then as many of the bros here would say. You don't need to a top body or new body to get sharp pics
 

Shafune

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blurriness in most cases, i'm afraid to say, is probably due to user error. Pixel size (i assume u meant megapixel) is critical when you need to do heavy cropping or printing, and in this case, would never contribute to your blur pictures.
If user error is the case, by using the same person to use both DSLRs, the error should be consistent. However, that is not the case. The canon 550D still produced a much sharper image.

The image as a whole is clear and seems sharp on both DSLRs. However when i crop the image from the A300, the details aren't that sharp whereas the 550D has sharp details.
 

Atarandas

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#5
If user error is the case, by using the same person to use both DSLRs, the error should be consistent. However, that is not the case. The canon 550D still produced a much sharper image.

The image as a whole is clear and seems sharp on both DSLRs. However when i crop the image from the A300, the details aren't that sharp whereas the 550D has sharp details.
There is a possibility of the inconsistent user shake when using two different camera with. Different grip and weight . Hence though it's the same person at two instances with different cameras it might result in different degree of movement . But thats generally speaking might not be that in your case.

Ic so you are saying that after cropping the details in pc you find a degradation in iq? I assume that is done on pc ?

Typically the lesser mp the more crop you do the more details you lose. Mp would determine resolution of the pictures . For eg on a 24mp fx sensor , you take a picture and crop it by half , you will still get a very high resolution picture at a 19 inch LCD . Compared to a 8 mp pic crop by half.

If I rem correctly a300 is 10mp and 550d 14mp ?
 

Akatsuki

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#6
If user error is the case, by using the same person to use both DSLRs, the error should be consistent. However, that is not the case. The canon 550D still produced a much sharper image.

The image as a whole is clear and seems sharp on both DSLRs. However when i crop the image from the A300, the details aren't that sharp whereas the 550D has sharp details.
the only way to prove this point is to carried out a test in a controlled environment (tripod mount at least) and remote trigger to remove all user-related error/inconsistency... alternatively, the copy of said lens might have a case of back/front/inconsistency focusing issue.

edit: some filters MIGHT degrade pic quality issue, just my 2 cents.
 

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Atarandas

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#7
Having said that the difference in mp is only visible behind certain size. Sometimes unless we pixel peep, we can't tie the difference
 

#8
the only way to prove this point is to carried out a test in a controlled environment (tripod mount at least) and remote trigger to remove all user-related error/inconsistency...
I agree with this. To eliminate user related inconsistencies, you need to perform the test under controlled circumstances. Tripods, timer/remote trigger, same settings, IS/VR/OS off, etc. As for pixel size, while having high pixel count is good, the quality of the pixels are just as important. Its no point having a whole bunch of noise tainted pixels when you can have a smaller group of high quality ones to form a beautiful image. Pixel count is a marketing gimmick, the truth is that pixel count is not equivalent to the number of photosites on a sensor. Through interpolation, sensor data can be manipulated to churn out any desired pixel count. Look up on "Bayer Interpolation" or "Bayer Filter" in google and you can find much information on this. :)

http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/bayer.htm
 

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Sep 4, 2010
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#9
Did your friend increase his 550D in-camera sharpness adjustment?
 

Rashkae

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Nov 28, 2005
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#10
1. Are you sure your tamron lens on the A300 is a sharp copy?
2. What ISO?
3. Daytime/nighttime?
4. Is your SSS on?
5. Are you on 100% crop on both?

I've seen stunningly sharp pictures from the old A300 withthe Tamron lens. You would not be able to tell what camera it's from. If you're seeing something else, why not join a Sony users outing and check/test/compare your cam?
 

Shafune

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#11
After doing some more test shots, I realised its more of a focussing error. My mistake.:sweat:

In that case, how do you bros make the details in your pictures sharp? Such as the eyes of the subject. Even when using spot metering sometimes the focus would be on the eyebrow or other nearby object.
 

kei1309

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#12
After doing some more test shots, I realised its more of a focussing error. My mistake.:sweat:

In that case, how do you bros make the details in your pictures sharp? Such as the eyes of the subject. Even when using spot metering sometimes the focus would be on the eyebrow or other nearby object.

use a smaller aperture to get a thicker DOF. surely then will eyes be sharper...
 

Rashkae

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#13
After doing some more test shots, I realised its more of a focussing error. My mistake.:sweat:

In that case, how do you bros make the details in your pictures sharp? Such as the eyes of the subject. Even when using spot metering sometimes the focus would be on the eyebrow or other nearby object.
Metering is different from focus. If you do spot focus on the eyes, you need to make sure you shoot before you or the subject move. Or else the plane of focus shifted.
 

Shafune

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#14
Metering is different from focus. If you do spot focus on the eyes, you need to make sure you shoot before you or the subject move. Or else the plane of focus shifted.

Oops. :sweat:
I usually half-trigger at the eye then move to compose the image. I guess thats wrong?
 

kei1309

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#16
Smaller aperture meaning bigger F number? Or you directly refering to the size of the aperture?
yes. bigger F number. F number relates to the size of the aperture. the larger the number, the smaller the aperture.

and your way of re-composing the image is not wrong. what Rashkae meant was..before the subject moves, take your shot. focusing works on the distance. when you "half-trigger", the AF is locked to that distance.

if the subject moves, it will be Out Of Focus, as the distance from you to the subject changes.. same with your movements
 

Shafune

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#17
yes. bigger F number. F number relates to the size of the aperture. the larger the number, the smaller the aperture.

and your way of re-composing the image is not wrong. what Rashkae meant was..before the subject moves, take your shot. focusing works on the distance. when you "half-trigger", the AF is locked to that distance.

if the subject moves, it will be Out Of Focus, as the distance from you to the subject changes.. same with your movements
Oooh. Okay. I understand. Thanks alot bros! :bsmilie:
 

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