picture too bright....


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Dec 2, 2005
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#1
are there any ways to balance the contrast if the pictures taken are too bright?
 

night86mare

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#2
Overexposed pictures are usually harder to save. Somehow highlight details that are blown (aka overexposed) cannot be saved, compared to shadow details that are underexposed - those can be saved albeit at the expense of noise if the underexposure is too severe.

Did you shoot in RAW? If you shot in RAW then there is more hope than if you shot in JPG. Also depends on how too bright your pictures are. If you could post them up and let us know what format you shot in, then the people here could give you better advice as to how to go about doing it. =)
 

Dec 2, 2005
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#3
Overexposed pictures are usually harder to save. Somehow highlight details that are blown (aka overexposed) cannot be saved, compared to shadow details that are underexposed - those can be saved albeit at the expense of noise if the underexposure is too severe.

Did you shoot in RAW? If you shot in RAW then there is more hope than if you shot in JPG. Also depends on how too bright your pictures are. If you could post them up and let us know what format you shot in, then the people here could give you better advice as to how to go about doing it. =)
thanks for your reply:)

the picture was taken in jpg btw......

 

garou12

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#4
sorry to say very hard or even unsalvagable :(
 

night86mare

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#5
Hey - best I could do with your picture:



Tell me if you wish me to remove it.

Way too blown already, has some posterisation, and it looks really bad in corner because the skin tone is way too white and ghostly, so I just changed it to B&W and did some contrast/highlights/shadows manipulation.

If you look at it the details at some areas , i.e. the contours have been destroyed by the overexposure.
 

Dec 2, 2005
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#7
Hey - best I could do with your picture:



Tell me if you wish me to remove it.

Way too blown already, has some posterisation, and it looks really bad in corner because the skin tone is way too white and ghostly, so I just changed it to B&W and did some contrast/highlights/shadows manipulation.

If you look at it the details at some areas , i.e. the contours have been destroyed by the overexposure.
thanks for your help anyway.....

btw is it because of flash or the camera quality (olympus 3.2 mega pixels) that causes this?
 

night86mare

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#11
so to put it simple it's better not to use flash when taking indoor pics?
No, most indoor pictures need flash, but to take a good one which is properly exposed, you should learn how to make the right exposure to compensate for flash, and if your flash can be controlled, how to control it.

What mode were you using for that? And what sort of camera, what sort of flash? =)
 

Michael

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#12
thanks for your help anyway.....

btw is it because of flash or the camera quality (olympus 3.2 mega pixels) that causes this?
Its the exposure meter of the camera that got fooled into a too high flash output. There are a lot of dark areas in the photo (specially visible in the B&W photo), the girls skin on the other hand is very pale and bright. The camera does not know that the background is far away and cannot be brightened by the flash. So the exposure meter tells the flash to fire at its highest capacity combined with low shutter speed and open aperture. While this worked fine for the background and her apron, her skin did not like it.
How to work around it? Does your camera allow to change for centre weight metering or for manual flash settings? if you have centre weight metering then meter on the skin not on the blacks, if you have manual flash settings then reduce flash output until ok, if none of this its difficult...
 

chankp

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Jan 14, 2006
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#13
Maybe can try Nikon Capture NX u point.
Not sure if it will help.
You can download a trail version from nikon website.
 

jopel

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Dec 21, 2004
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#15
so to put it simple it's better not to use flash when taking indoor pics?
try this trick - put one or two layers of tissue papers in front of the flash.

to salvage your pic will require a bit of ps.
 

Dec 2, 2005
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#16
No, most indoor pictures need flash, but to take a good one which is properly exposed, you should learn how to make the right exposure to compensate for flash, and if your flash can be controlled, how to control it.

What mode were you using for that? And what sort of camera, what sort of flash? =)
i was using auto flash and previously there is no such problems
 

ExplorerZ

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#17
i was using auto flash and previously there is no such problems
look at the original and see if your focus is at the background instead? if so most probably your camera have ttl the flash for the background as it thought it is very far away and fired at full power.
 

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