photography lessons ??


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austin1

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Nov 16, 2006
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#1
Any classes out there giv lesson ..like mon-friday ... or full day course... don want those like one month to complete ..... .. me working on shift .. hard to take time off...
Need to go for lesson cause my pic really really bad .... donno how to improved ... ??
 

obewan

New Member
Feb 11, 2005
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obe.homedns.org
#2
Any classes out there giv lesson ..like mon-friday ... or full day course... don want those like one month to complete ..... .. me working on shift .. hard to take time off...
Need to go for lesson cause my pic really really bad .... donno how to improved ... ??
Photography is art, it takes time to appreciate, practise and absorb. You will not improve much attending a one week lesson. Of course, you will pick up some basic tips.

Check this out.
http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/showthread.php?t=357474

If you really don't have time to attend a proper course, you can check out this thread too. A kind soul has
offer to help.
http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/showthread.php?t=357879
 

nsr182

New Member
Feb 26, 2008
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#3
thanx obewan...
newbie too here...
finding sources to improve...
 

billpepsi

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Jan 2, 2005
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The 3rd Rock
#4
Any classes out there giv lesson ..like mon-friday ... or full day course... don want those like one month to complete ..... .. me working on shift .. hard to take time off...
Need to go for lesson cause my pic really really bad .... donno how to improved ... ??
You may want to check out Francis' photography courses, whom was a ex-photojournalist.

http://francislee62.multiply.com/calendar/item/10029
 

Leong23

Senior Member
Oct 18, 2007
3,186
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within myself
#5
At the mean time, you might want to do some reading.

Join a photography club and join their outing, it is a good channel to learn by seeing how others shoot.

There are some courses, gathering and outing posted in CS, check up a fews and see which one suit your timing.
 

ppong

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Feb 27, 2008
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www.flickr.com
#6
For me, I think the best way to learn is to read, then experiment and practice, then post the pictures here for people to critique.
 

ashmom

New Member
Mar 7, 2008
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#7
I've attended the basic DSLR course at Photographic Society of Singapore conducted by several photographers. I find it a very good primer course. Most of the lessons are conducted by Steven Yee who is a very young but well recognised photographer. He also has his own courses here http://www.knowledgebowl.com.sg/photography.html.
 

#8
Cheaper solution:
Go to the nearest library. There are a lot of photography books there, for the beginner up to advance. Then practice with the book in front of you, there are a lot of things you can learn even when you're at home. This is the most important. Without practice no one will be able to produce good picture.
 

Daneal79

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Jul 14, 2007
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#10
try knowledgebowls' range of courses. the beginner dslr/slr course is $200 for 10 lessons including 2 practical lessons (1 outdoor day & 1 night photography)

im going through that course now although ive been reading up on articles, books past 6 months, i find that guidance from instructors and sharing in the class does help put things in perspective.

important is to practise, take pictures and play around with it. afterall, its a hobby...for now :bsmilie:
 

dw8888

New Member
Sep 27, 2007
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#11
I understand the urgue of wanting to learn more when you got your new DSLR camera.;)
I search all over the internet. I got no knowledge of what I will learn there initially and by reading some books from the library, I have alway this feeling that I know everything already. Then why I still want to waste my money and my time?:think:

The answer to that question is very simple. That is, I want to know more.:)
 

#13
Just another opinion...

What I need in learning photography is not to know more... but to understand more...

Example, I maybe know the meaning of the depth of field and its relation to f stops, thus I know why my wife's eye in her photo is in focus while her ear is not. But only with practice, that I will understand on what to do to make sure that both are reasonably in focus.

For me, reading books, browsing internet, attending course will add knowledge, but without practice I will not understand that knowledge. That's why I love to read and practice at the same time. Once I understand something, I will be able to apply it without too much thinking about the theory.

My two cents.
 

yamapi

Deregistered
Feb 27, 2008
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#14
Just another opinion...

What I need in learning photography is not to know more... but to understand more...

Example, I maybe know the meaning of the depth of field and its relation to f stops, thus I know why my wife's eye in her photo is in focus while her ear is not. But only with practice, that I will understand on what to do to make sure that both are reasonably in focus.

For me, reading books, browsing internet, attending course will add knowledge, but without practice I will not understand that knowledge. That's why I love to read and practice at the same time. Once I understand something, I will be able to apply it without too much thinking about the theory.

My two cents.


It's due to depth of field.
getting a longer lens will allow you more working distance.

Alternatively,shooting at smaller apeture will help 'remove' the blurnss but it also means that your background will appear sharper too instead of having bokeh.
 

ISOhunt

New Member
Mar 11, 2008
4
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#15
hi everyone, i'm new too. i usually go out with a bunch of friends with our cameras. we are all new :bsmilie:

we will take random shots. when the lighting comes out wrong, we will set the camera to auto and take a shot. then view the photo and try to configure it to the auto setting.

it's a little like cheating but i think it helps in the learning process

any advice is welcomed
 

giantcanopy

Senior Member
Feb 11, 2007
6,232
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SG
#16
we will take random shots. when the lighting comes out wrong, we will set the camera to auto and take a shot.
Hmmm but the camera auto setting might not always be the correct settings :embrass:
 

Sareth

New Member
Jan 13, 2008
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Singapore
www.thecrafting.com
#17
hi everyone, i'm new too. i usually go out with a bunch of friends with our cameras. we are all new :bsmilie:

we will take random shots. when the lighting comes out wrong, we will set the camera to auto and take a shot. then view the photo and try to configure it to the auto setting.

it's a little like cheating but i think it helps in the learning process

any advice is welcomed
Speaking as someone who judges settings by looking at the playback instead of light meter, maybe you can try the following:

If shooting still-life / other non-moving things on a tripod:
1) Set the aperture and ISO (usually the lowest Eg. 100) to what you want
2) Adjust shutter speed to whatever is needed. (Eg. 1/40 will be brighter than 1/80.) 15 or 30 secs even are not too long, if that's what's required.

If hand-holding / shooting fast-moving stuff:
1) Set shutter speed to the slowest you can without things getting blur (eg. 1/80 is slower than 1/200). If too bright, set the speed faster.
2) Adjust aperture (Eg. f/2.8 will be brighter than f/22) Just adjust it one or two stops at a time, later experience will tell you faster how much adjustment is needed.
3) If still too dark, adjust ISO (Eg. ISO 100 is darker than ISO 1600, but picture quality is better at ISO 100)

If you need the depth of field to be fixed:
1) Set the aperture
2) Adjust shutter speed / ISO

The above is just some rough guidelines. It's not really a fixed thing. Sometimes you might want to compromise a bit here and there. Like there isn't much difference in picture quality between ISO 100 and 200, so if it's a choice between setting ISO 200 or making the shutter speed slower, ISO 200 might be a better choice, especially if it's for shooting a moving object.
 

Sareth

New Member
Jan 13, 2008
46
0
0
Singapore
www.thecrafting.com
#18
hi everyone, i'm new too. i usually go out with a bunch of friends with our cameras. we are all new :bsmilie:

we will take random shots. when the lighting comes out wrong, we will set the camera to auto and take a shot. then view the photo and try to configure it to the auto setting.

it's a little like cheating but i think it helps in the learning process

any advice is welcomed
Maybe you can try the following:

If shooting still-life / other non-moving things on a tripod:
1) Set the aperture and ISO (usually the lowest Eg. 100) to what you want
2) Adjust shutter speed to whatever is needed. (Eg. 1/40 will be brighter than 1/80.) 15 or 30 secs even are not too long, if that's what's required.

If hand-holding / shooting fast-moving stuff:
1) Set shutter speed to the slowest you can without things getting blur (eg. 1/80 is slower than 1/200). If too bright, set the speed faster.
2) Adjust aperture (Eg. f/2.8 will be brighter than f/22) Just adjust it one or two stops at a time, later experience will tell you faster how much adjustment is needed.
3) If still too dark, adjust ISO (Eg. ISO 100 is darker than ISO 1600, but picture quality is better at ISO 100)

If you need the depth of field to be fixed:
1) Set the aperture
2) Adjust shutter speed / ISO

The above is just some rough guidelines. It's not really a fixed thing. Sometimes you might want to compromise a bit here and there. Like there isn't much difference in picture quality between ISO 100 and 200, so if it's a choice between setting ISO 200 or making the shutter speed slower, ISO 200 might be a better choice, especially if it's for shooting a moving object.
 

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