Photography for food


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joyjoy

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Oct 8, 2005
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a place I call home
#1
I would like to know any tips to take those yummy looking photos with the steam and all that

I have been trying but dun seem to be able to get the steam
Hope to make the food look really yummy in the pic
 

NoMoney

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Mar 20, 2007
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Ang Mo Kio
#2
Steam... I used to play dry ice that comes with the ice cream cake. Lots of steam when dry ice mixed with water :)
 

cjtune

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Mar 20, 2006
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#3
From your thread title, I thought you were jobless and starving and wanted to give your services for fill your stomach!

Anyhow, I remember coming across some photography book in Page One (maybe available elsewhere too) that touches specifically on food photography. Not just the lighting and camera settings, but also how to prepare the food too (eg. colouring or burning it to give the desired look instead of actually cooking it). Maybe it holds the secret to make your 'steam'.
 

diver-hloc

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Apr 17, 2007
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Somewhere North
#4
I remember watching a TV show that said the 'smoke' we see rising up is not steam but a chem added in..... that means the food is not fit to be eaten. Something to do with the real steam doesn't 'rise' high enough or in large enough volume in real life........ :what:
 

Dream Merchant

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Jan 11, 2007
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#6
Do a search joyjoy. there was a thread with a few pages discussing this before in CS. But I think 'steam' was misspelled as 'stream' IIRC. Or just key in 'food' or 'steam'.

CHEERS!
 

joyjoy

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Oct 8, 2005
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a place I call home
#8
Do a search joyjoy. there was a thread with a few pages discussing this before in CS. But I think 'steam' was misspelled as 'stream' IIRC. Or just key in 'food' or 'steam'.

CHEERS!
well i did try to search but i cold not get anything man
any way thanx for the time
 

Nov 4, 2006
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#10
Hmm btw for food photography, should one use wide or narrow aperture? I heard it's better to use narrow aperture to get most parts of the food in focus. But I've seen food photography looking great using wide aperture too. Are both acceptable? ;p
 

tulalit

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Dec 28, 2007
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#11
Both narrow and wide apetures are acceptable and it depends on the clients wish-list really. However, the trend these days is wide apetures where we direct the viewers attention to only a small area. :)
 

tulalit

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Dec 28, 2007
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#12
I would like to know any tips to take those yummy looking photos with the steam and all that

I have been trying but dun seem to be able to get the steam
Hope to make the food look really yummy in the pic
For smoke effect I use cigarette or joystick (if it is non soup items). I 'll pull it away (fast) the moment I want to take the shots so as not to disturb to natural flow of the smoke created.:)
 

hanqiang1011

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Jan 22, 2005
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Tiny Red Dot...
www.blitzwerkz.com
#14
From your thread title, I thought you were jobless and starving and wanted to give your services for fill your stomach!

Anyhow, I remember coming across some photography book in Page One (maybe available elsewhere too) that touches specifically on food photography. Not just the lighting and camera settings, but also how to prepare the food too (eg. colouring or burning it to give the desired look instead of actually cooking it). Maybe it holds the secret to make your 'steam'.
There uis a book by the famous New York food photographer by the name of Lou Manna... It is still selling at Page One Vivocity...
 

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