Photography Course


Status
Not open for further replies.
Apr 20, 2009
100
0
16
#1
Hi, does anyone ever take up basic photography course from:

a) SLCC
b) SAFRA Photographic Club
d) Objectifs

Which of the above school would you guys recommend? Advise pls... Thanks.
 

Reportage

Senior Member
Nov 24, 2008
5,785
2
0
#2
none unless you have money to burn or the right questions to ask the trainer.

go to local library and borrow books on the subject or look at online video tutorials.

best of all, see if can join a photo gathering...
 

Sivakis

New Member
Sep 26, 2008
569
0
0
#3
If you already have the camera in your hand, then the camera is probably your best teacher. It won't do what it can't do, and it won't do what you are asking it to do if you're asking wrongly.

There are plenty of tutorials available on the internet and through magazines. As Reportage mentioned, NLB is a great source for these reference books. Skip the more technical tutorials that require equipment that you don't already own and aim for the basics like determining Aperture, Shutter, ISO. Get to understand these 3 aspects well first before branching into composition or deliberately moving away from the norm for desired effects.

Going for basic photography classes are okay if you think paying money for them is more worthwhile to you as compared to searching the internet or other free sources. Perhaps the time taken is not productive in your eyes, to which I shall not dispute.

Read, practice, read, practice. The more you shoot and understand where it went wrong, the faster you will improve.
 

Octarine

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
12,488
26
48
Pasir Ris
#4
Two friends of mine took Objectifes course, a colleague used SAFRA. All are happy. Whether you take such courses or not depends on your style of learning. Some people prefer the guided way with a teacher at hand to ask questions, others go the DIY way with library. Finally up to you. The convenience of guidance carries the price tag. But from what I have heard the price is very reasonable for what you get.
 

Jun 16, 2009
506
0
0
#5
deleted
 

Last edited:

limwhow

Senior Member
Jun 9, 2009
7,048
0
0
Life revolves arOnd East Coast
#6
none unless you have money to burn or the right questions to ask the trainer.

go to local library and borrow books on the subject or look at online video tutorials.

best of all, see if can join a photo gathering...
Hi, I read with interest the postings on this thread.
May I ask for those of you who have attended workshops and gathering photoshoots, what do you derive from the gatherings? And what added advantage would one benefit from say, a gathering shoot of some models or landscape or something like that?
 

ZerocoolAstra

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2008
9,522
0
0
rainy Singapore
#7
If you attend gatherings, the other photographers are just that... photographers. Since they're not earning any money, they aren't obliged to give your their 100% attention.
In the outings that I've organised, i've tried to be as helpful as possible. But it's still mainly self-learning with some guidance along the way.

It's the $ you pay for the attention you get, to put it simply.
 

Sivakis

New Member
Sep 26, 2008
569
0
0
#8
If you attend gatherings, the other photographers are just that... photographers. Since they're not earning any money, they aren't obliged to give your their 100% attention.
In the outings that I've organised, i've tried to be as helpful as possible. But it's still mainly self-learning with some guidance along the way.

It's the $ you pay for the attention you get, to put it simply.
That's provided that the attention you get (if any) is what you expect or hope for. ;)
 

Octarine

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
12,488
26
48
Pasir Ris
#9
That's provided that the attention you get (if any) is what you expect or hope for. ;)
To adjust your expectation you can ask the organizer about the trainer / student ratio as usually given in the model shootings. Also, one can expect a higher degree of attention and support from a dedicated course where trainer make some money compared to a gathering where people just share with the crowd.
 

limwhow

Senior Member
Jun 9, 2009
7,048
0
0
Life revolves arOnd East Coast
#10
If you attend gatherings, the other photographers are just that... photographers. Since they're not earning any money, they aren't obliged to give your their 100% attention.
In the outings that I've organised, i've tried to be as helpful as possible. But it's still mainly self-learning with some guidance along the way.

It's the $ you pay for the attention you get, to put it simply.
I see. So I gather that if you are going for a photoshoot gathering, then it is mainly an exchange of ideas to a certain limit. And you can also observe how the others in action. I reckon you would already have had some level of proficiency before it'll benefit you to attend a gathering, right?
Whereas a workshop is good for those who want new ideas, new takes on creativity, composition, etc etc. right?
 

Octarine

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
12,488
26
48
Pasir Ris
#11
Whereas a workshop is good for those who want new ideas, new takes on creativity, composition, etc etc. right?
A course can also be a well-structured guidance into the very basics of photography, delivering the knowledge and facts step by step. It's not only the knowledge and facts, it's also about the "How to teach" - didactics. Whereas in a gathering you can get hundreds of 'advices' like "must do this.. must do that" and all the gear drooling which can be rather confusing.
 

ZerocoolAstra

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2008
9,522
0
0
rainy Singapore
#12
I see. So I gather that if you are going for a photoshoot gathering, then it is mainly an exchange of ideas to a certain limit. And you can also observe how the others in action. I reckon you would already have had some level of proficiency before it'll benefit you to attend a gathering, right?
Whereas a workshop is good for those who want new ideas, new takes on creativity, composition, etc etc. right?
If you go on a photography outing totally blur-blur, hopefully someone is patient and willing to guide you along. But at the same time, you can't expect that person to give you his/her undivided attention whilst you struggle with the camera. Some prior basic knowledge helps.
Photography outings are usually social events first, and learning opportunities second. You meet new friends with the same interest, which is the main motivation factor for these outings.
 

Reportage

Senior Member
Nov 24, 2008
5,785
2
0
#13
Hi, I read with interest the postings on this thread.
May I ask for those of you who have attended workshops and gathering photoshoots, what do you derive from the gatherings? And what added advantage would one benefit from say, a gathering shoot of some models or landscape or something like that?
To put it simply, you can see theory in practical situations and most photographers wont mind sharing their experiences often over coffee or tea. Its something like taking driving practicals before going for advanced theory test...if you know what the people are talking about, easier to grasp what they are teaching and thats when you should go for guided lessons if needed.
 

limwhow

Senior Member
Jun 9, 2009
7,048
0
0
Life revolves arOnd East Coast
#14
You know, I am so happy to hear all of your opinions here. Simply, I have never had an opportunity to attend any Photography workshop, not to mention outings. I only read and take photos.
And very like a hermit, I believe there has got to be some exchange for one to grow.
What good Photo workshop/courses have you ever participated which you can recommend me? I won't say that I am an experienced photographer, but neither am I totally virgin to the basics.. I sort of like in between, if you know what I mean.. Know all the basics, but still has c--k ups here and there with exposures... not entirely proficient in composition.
Need your advice!
 

#15
You know, I am so happy to hear all of your opinions here. Simply, I have never had an opportunity to attend any Photography workshop, not to mention outings. I only read and take photos.
And very like a hermit, I believe there has got to be some exchange for one to grow.
What good Photo workshop/courses have you ever participated which you can recommend me? I won't say that I am an experienced photographer, but neither am I totally virgin to the basics.. I sort of like in between, if you know what I mean.. Know all the basics, but still has c--k ups here and there with exposures... not entirely proficient in composition.
Need your advice!
After you attend advance photography courses.. You might just throw away your 5DMKII.... :bsmilie:

Exposure not good? Challenge yourself... Like in the film days... Stick to ISO 200 or 400 for a day. Just play with Aperture and shutter. Bring only 1 prime/ 1 zoom lens per outing. Somehow, it will force one to think harder about getting the correct exposure.

To TS
Know what is Light and train your eyes to pick up light. Not many people remember What is light and Why we See What we see/ feel.

Taking up courses or not depends on your style of learning. There may not be a course that you can learn everything from. It is best ask as much question as possible until you are satisfied with the answer.

Like some have mentioned. It is always good to learn from a one another in gatherings. It is even better to learn from the best.

I started with Seagull, contax film casual shooting. Did part time studio asst photog. Just 2 years back, I joined a club. Ever since under the mentoring and exposure from various veteran photographers, my pictures have drastically improved. We encourage each other (fellow course mates) to join competitions and titles to further improve our skills.

Of course, I have also fellow course mates who still stay the way they used to shot. They enjoy it and that is very important.

It is a lot of HARD WORK (and money) if you intend to pursue it as a career/ life time hobby.

Keep shooting. :-}

I not a casual shooter. :-}
 

Last edited:
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top Bottom