photo colors are dull ...


Status
Not open for further replies.

shmott

New Member
Mar 24, 2002
463
0
0
43
Sin jia por lor...
#1
I noticed most of my photos are dull in color.. like the trees not green.. etc etc.. issit the film i used or the developer..
or maybe its the wrong exposure? they dont look over exposed or underexposed.. so i wonder.. i use mainly kodak and fuji.. those off the supermarket check out counters.. or is there any slightly better film for hobbyist like me?thanks.


added this for reference
 

Kit

Senior Member
Jan 19, 2002
11,692
42
48
42
Upper Bukit Timah
Visit site
#2
Originally posted by shmott
I noticed most of my photos are dull in color.. like the trees not green.. etc etc.. issit the film i used or the developer..
or maybe its the wrong exposure? they dont look over exposed or underexposed.. so i wonder.. i use mainly kodak and fuji.. those off the supermarket check out counters.. or is there any slightly better film for hobbyist like me?thanks.
Its difficult to pin point the problem without seeing your pictures. Yes, of course there are better films than those sold at supermarket check out counters. In my opinion, its a crime to save on film if good results are what you want.

For prints, I use Fuji Reala and rate it at ISO 64 for better colour saturation. For slides, I use Velvia.
 

shmott

New Member
Mar 24, 2002
463
0
0
43
Sin jia por lor...
#3
where can i get those film u have mention.. i think i wont move into slide yet.. just film.. but wat is the actual rating of reala? u make your camera think its iso64?
 

Kit

Senior Member
Jan 19, 2002
11,692
42
48
42
Upper Bukit Timah
Visit site
#4
Originally posted by shmott
where can i get those film u have mention.. i think i wont move into slide yet.. just film.. but wat is the actual rating of reala? u make your camera think its iso64?
Reala is usually readily available in shops around the Peninsula area. Try Cathay and Ruby. Reala is actually ISO 100. I just set the ISO reading on the camera to 64 instead of the automatic reading of 100. However, I precess the neg as normal.
 

erwinx

Senior Member
Jan 18, 2002
2,423
0
0
Visit site
#6
photo looks normal. If u shoot this kind of subject matter, in this kind of light, this is usually what you'll get.

p.s. from the appearance of the print, i will make a wild guess that film used was Fuji.
 

V

Vadim

Guest
#9
1) Find a good lab. Or even better - consider shooting slides. Slide film gives richer color saturation, better color reproduction, and can hold at least twice as much contrast as prints. I would try Velvia for such situations.

2) Reduce flare by putting shade on the lens. Make sure that no direct sunlight is hitting the front element.

3) Polarizer would lower the haze, improve foliage colors by reducing glare, and make sky blue.

4) Try shooting same scene in the morning or in the evening.
 

Adam Goi

ClubSNAP Idol
Staff member
#10
I used to stand by print film until one photoshoot when I collected my negatives and did a scan (I was using Fujifilm Superia 400 Xtra then); to my disappointment, the coconut trees pics that I took then exhibited the same 'problem' as you have mentioned; with factors like whether it's properly exposured remaining constant.

I was then I saw a fellow shooter's same take using slides (docile) which began to stir my interest in switching film...OMG...the greens are really green, among others...buy a roll of slides and try it out! ;)
 

shmott

New Member
Mar 24, 2002
463
0
0
43
Sin jia por lor...
#11
what are the costs involved in developing slides.. can paper photos be developed from slide film too? any place to recommend... and issit true that slide films are more sensitive meaning not much tolerance in exposures..
 

Lennier

New Member
Feb 26, 2002
172
0
0
simpleshooter.clubsnap.org
#12
Presently, it costs about $4-$4.50 to develop a roll of slide film without mounting i.e. in strips of "negatives".

You can do slide to print photos although they're pretty costly. a 4R can set you back between $1.10-$1.80 per photo. It's cheaper if you have access to a good film scanner and give the shops a CD to print from instead. Would be cheaper if you did this in bulk.

Slide films, are very intolerant to exposure errors. As there is no printing stage (as opposed to print films), errors cannot be corrected so your exposure has to be SPOT on (or give/take 0.5 stops). Slide films aren't very good for scenes with very high contrast either.

That said however, slide films offer much greater saturation that print films cannot offer.
 

LifeWorld

Senior Member
Jan 18, 2002
2,324
0
0
East Coast
lifeworld.multiply.com
#14
Originally posted by shmott
I noticed most of my photos are dull in color.. like the trees not green.. etc etc.. issit the film i used or the developer..
or maybe its the wrong exposure? they dont look over exposed or underexposed.. so i wonder.. i use mainly kodak and fuji.. those off the supermarket check out counters.. or is there any slightly better film for hobbyist like me?thanks.


added this for reference
I think the pic is pinky!
 

Status
Not open for further replies.
Top Bottom