Panning bike


May 30, 2010
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#1



1. in what area is critique to be sought?
Composition, exposure, sharpness, etc...

2. what one hopes to achieve with the piece of work?
Tried panning a boy riding a bike, hope the subject is of reasonable sharpness and background is reasonable blurred.

3. under what circumstance is the picture taken? (physical conditions/emotions)
Saw some children cycling at a open court around 7pm, pan and snap the picture of a boy on the bike. The boy was riding his bike at a reasonable speed, but not very fast.

Exposure Program: Shutter
Exposure time: 1/25 sec
F-Number: f/4
ISO: 200
Focal Length: 70mm

4. what the critique seeker personally thinks of the picture
First time tried panning, took few shots and chose the ok one. However, I find the background might not be that blurred out.
 

Last edited:
Jan 14, 2010
83
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Bedok Road, Singapore
#2
I have tried this type of shot ( but with a horse ) and know how hard it is to pan smoothly at the correct speed. Haven't tried it with "Live View", which would probably make it easier.

If your intention was to convey a sense of fun & speed then this shot works for me.

Good shot.
 

mikeyjayy

New Member
Sep 21, 2010
173
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#3
hi there, regarding your composition.. i feel that you can crop away some space behind the bicycle and also the top. in that way, there will be more concentrated active space for the bicycle to move into.

as you get better with panning, you can drag your shutter speed to achieve "blurrer" background with your subject staying reasonably sharp.

one tip i learnt is to set your camera in burst mode, AF-C, and fire away while panning with your subject. there's bound to be a nicely panned picture in the bunch.

exposure wise, i think the picture is slightly underexposed. making the red shirt of the boy seem dull. maybe you can try up-ing the exposure and maybe increase the saturation a touch?

all in all, i feel that all panning attempts have to start somewhere. and kudos for your attempt!

My humble 2 cents.
 

Jul 2, 2010
180
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#4
I have tried this type of shot ( but with a horse ) and know how hard it is to pan smoothly at the correct speed. Haven't tried it with "Live View", which would probably make it easier.

If your intention was to convey a sense of fun & speed then this shot works for me.

Good shot.
i think live view will focus slower so not too good for panning..
 

intrance

New Member
Jul 13, 2005
421
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Woodlands
#5
i feel the background need to be oof more.. lower f no. might help..
and the green/yellow light is very distracting..
maybe u like to explore at different angle..
 

May 30, 2010
23
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0
#6
I have tried this type of shot ( but with a horse ) and know how hard it is to pan smoothly at the correct speed. Haven't tried it with "Live View", which would probably make it easier.

If your intention was to convey a sense of fun & speed then this shot works for me.

Good shot.
Thanks Bob. ;)

hi there, regarding your composition.. i feel that you can crop away some space behind the bicycle and also the top. in that way, there will be more concentrated active space for the bicycle to move into.

as you get better with panning, you can drag your shutter speed to achieve "blurrer" background with your subject staying reasonably sharp.

one tip i learnt is to set your camera in burst mode, AF-C, and fire away while panning with your subject. there's bound to be a nicely panned picture in the bunch.

exposure wise, i think the picture is slightly underexposed. making the red shirt of the boy seem dull. maybe you can try up-ing the exposure and maybe increase the saturation a touch?

all in all, i feel that all panning attempts have to start somewhere. and kudos for your attempt!

My humble 2 cents.
Thanks mikeyjayy. I will need to experiment next time with different shuttle speed and higher aperture no.
As it was around 7pm then, thus the sky is getting dark. Will see about boosting up the exposure. I am positioning the child following rule of 1/3, as for cropping the space behind the bike? Hmmm....


i feel the background need to be oof more.. lower f no. might help..
and the green/yellow light is very distracting..
maybe u like to explore at different angle..
Thanks intrance. Will definitely try out different settings and perspective next time.
 

Abbot Man

New Member
Aug 4, 2009
181
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0
gallery.me.com
#7
i feel the background need to be oof more.. lower f no. might help..
and the green/yellow light is very distracting..
maybe u like to explore at different angle..
I agreed; to factors help a good pan:
1. Shooting against a relatively plain background.
2. Photographing the subject against a darker background.
 

Abbot Man

New Member
Aug 4, 2009
181
0
0
gallery.me.com
#8
Thanks Bob. ;)



Thanks mikeyjayy. I will need to experiment next time with different shuttle speed and higher aperture no.
As it was around 7pm then, thus the sky is getting dark. Will see about boosting up the exposure. I am positioning the child following rule of 1/3, as for cropping the space behind the bike? Hmmm....




Thanks intrance. Will definitely try out different settings and perspective next time.
For your information...to ensure a steady pan use an image stabilization lens ( I am sure you are). The vibration reduction mode should be set to NORMAL for Nikon lens,
 

May 30, 2010
23
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#9
For your information...to ensure a steady pan use an image stabilization lens ( I am sure you are). The vibration reduction mode should be set to NORMAL for Nikon lens,
Abbot man, you are right! Sorry, I am still very new, may I know why VR needs to be off when doing panning?
 

Astroben

New Member
Aug 3, 2010
289
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0
#10
Is Continuous Focusing mode and tripod a must for panning shots?
 

Jan 5, 2011
33
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#11
Abbot man, you are right! Sorry, I am still very new, may I know why VR needs to be off when doing panning?
If you're using a Canon version (70-200 f/2.8 IS I/II) Set IS to Mode 2... It's for panning.

Or, I would suggest getting a lens with very wide aperture... Such as the 85mm f/1.2L or 50mm f/1.2L. If you're broke, rent one. I'm sure you'll be (slightly/more) satisfied with ur pans if you know how to tame them:think:...
 

Astroben

New Member
Aug 3, 2010
289
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0
#12
Tried it once on a cab out of curiousity one day and found it tough to execute on handheld
 

Jan 5, 2011
33
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0
#13
Is Continuous Focusing mode and tripod a must for panning shots?
Not a must... Either u can use AI Servo(What u referred to as "Continuous Focusing" or MF...

Tripod is not necessary, if your hands can tame the beast of the lens.
 

Astroben

New Member
Aug 3, 2010
289
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0
#14
I'm using Nikon.
There's two focusing mode, Single and Continuous.
Single locks focus during half shutter, Continuous keeps focusing at moving subject.
Hope I didn't get any info wrong;)
 

Jan 5, 2011
33
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#15


No, this isn't OOF... Taken with a 85mm f/1.2L @ f/1.2... (Basically it means that any panning shots I take with this @ f1.2 will have a very narrow focus pt, which if u look closer, is at the extreme right corner where the NCC logo is...)
 

kwttan

New Member
Jan 8, 2010
845
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0
Concrete jungle
#16
No, this isn't OOF... Taken with a 85mm f/1.2L @ f/1.2... (Basically it means that any panning shots I take with this @ f1.2 will have a very narrow focus pt, which if u look closer, is at the extreme right corner where the NCC logo is...)

Hmmm... Are you trying to tell us this picture you posted is a panned picture? :think:
And I don't get what you are trying to express. :dunno:
 

Jan 5, 2011
33
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#17
Yes, it's panned. Just trying to show another example of a pan shot... :sweat:
 

kei1309

Senior Member
Apr 12, 2010
7,327
24
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Earth
www.facebook.com
#18
the whole image is too OOF to tell where the focus point is. even the NCC logo is OOF, and it's hard for viewers to tell if it's the focal point or not. it just looks more in focus because the logo is large. but even just looking closely, every part of the logo is a blur. so i think, it's more like the panning effect that didn't take. keep trying!
 

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