Olympics - No flash used?


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E1g3

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#1
Watching the olympics on TV, I noticed many photographers firing without flash with canon 70-200L for indoor games (fencing, boxing, badminton etc).
What do you think are the settings on camera for these indoor shots? we are talking about fast action sports and I thought flash is a must to stop action? :dunno:
 

UY79

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#2
E1g3 said:
Watching the olympics on TV, I noticed many photographers firing without flash with canon 70-200L for indoor games (fencing, boxing, badminton etc).
What do you think are the settings on camera for these indoor shots? we are talking about fast action sports and I thought flash is a must to stop action? :dunno:
Hi,

The use of flash will distract the players in a match, that is why flash is not used in most sports. They are probably shooting at shutter speed of around 1/500, using high ISO and fast lenses.

Cheers!
 

#3
Maybe that was what freaked out one half of the Chinese sychronzied diving pair, causing him to lose control and splattered all over the water.


UY79 said:
Hi,

The use of flash will distract the players in a match, that is why flash is not used in most sports. They are probably shooting at shutter speed of around 1/500, using high ISO and fast lenses.

Cheers!
 

Jed

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Flash spoils the atmosphere in the shot, doesn't cycle fast enough, can be disrupting and dangerous to the sportspeople.
 

Watcher

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Jed said:
Flash spoils the atmosphere in the shot, doesn't cycle fast enough, can be disrupting and dangerous to the sportspeople.
Agree. Flash not used in sports is the norm rather than exception as sports like diving or some gymnastic events is too disruptive.

Jed, what do you think is the lighting condition there (should be pretty good, I reckon), and what settings were they using?
 

E1g3

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So in this situation with a 70-200L, what's the best camera settings in term of ASA, Shutter and aperture?
 

nickmak

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#7
E1g3 said:
So in this situation with a 70-200L, what's the best camera settings in term of ASA, Shutter and aperture?
to stop action, of course highest ISO as the cam can go, fast shutter speed and big big aperture...
 

czeyang

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#8
E1g3 said:
Watching the olympics on TV, I noticed many photographers firing without flash with canon 70-200L for indoor games (fencing, boxing, badminton etc).
What do you think are the settings on camera for these indoor shots? we are talking about fast action sports and I thought flash is a must to stop action? :dunno:
http://www.sportsshooter.com/message_display.html?tid=11385
 

Jed

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Watcher said:
Jed, what do you think is the lighting condition there (should be pretty good, I reckon), and what settings were they using?
Don't know, it all depends on what they decide to put in. Lighting varies from ground to ground, arena to arena. Even how much they decide to turn on... for instance at the Commonwealth Games in 2002, the diving was EI1250 @ 1/500 @ f2.8, but several days later when the swimming started we were on EI640 @ 1/640 @ f2.8.

It would also more than likely vary from venue to venue as well, for instance the gymnastics light will be different from the table tennis from the badminton for instance.

Just on a casual level, I haven't seen as many 200/1.8s as I would have expected to see if the light was really bad, so I'd say we're looking at fairly good lighting, and it's generally better on the continent anyway. I'd suggest EI 400 to 800 @ 1/500 @ f2.8, but that's completely a guess. You cannot tell over the telly.
 

Jed

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#10
nickmak said:
to stop action, of course highest ISO as the cam can go, fast shutter speed and big big aperture...
Actually, it's the lowest ISO that you can go. We make compromises but generally you improve your situation with shutter speed taking absolute priority, followed by EI, and increasing to a moderate aperture if there really is light to spare.
 

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