Older model manual flash can be used with DSLR?


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Sion

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Hi, has anyone here used the older model manual flash with a DSLR?

I think I've read somewhere that it's inadvisable to do so because of difference in power and that it could damage the camera. Is that true?
 

Clown

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Mar 24, 2003
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no leh.. a camera just send a small current to trigger a manual flash that simply dumps its capacitors into the flash tube.. how does it damage the camera?
i used to use the old vivitar285 i got from gremlin years ago cuz it's so damn powerful. and yea it's fully manual cuz the thyristor doesnt really work..
 

forward

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Sion said:
Hi, has anyone here used the older model manual flash with a DSLR?

I think I've read somewhere that it's inadvisable to do so because of difference in power and that it could damage the camera. Is that true?
Have been using the Metz 60CT-1 and the Metz 32-Z1 on Nikon dSLRs without any problem. I was just like you afraid to use the older manual flash after reading that it's not advisable to do so. I took the risk and it pays off. (Instead of getting the over priced SB600 or the SB800). Have been using the Metz flashes for about two years already.

What brand of manual flash do you have?
 

lsisaxon

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Nov 29, 2004
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Sion said:
Hi, has anyone here used the older model manual flash with a DSLR?

I think I've read somewhere that it's inadvisable to do so because of difference in power and that it could damage the camera. Is that true?
No problems if you use in the auto mode or manual mode but not TTL.
 

lsisaxon

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Nov 29, 2004
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Sion said:
Thanks all for the help.
Having said all those, it is still important to know if the flash is using an electronic trigger or not. For those really ancient flash (pre-1980 or earlier), the hot shoe may exhibit very high voltage which may fry the delicate electronics of modern camera. This was the reason why they called it 'hot-shoe' because it can really give you a nasty shock if you touched it.
The earlier ones with electronic trigger are usually marked 'thyristor'. The modern ones are usually already using thyristor or IGBT anyway so they are no longer marked.
 

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