old supreme court - steps of justice


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andrewtansj

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Jul 26, 2007
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#1
took this picture at old supreme court. trying to capture a different angle from the ones posted, showing the combination of the cool and warm light on the architecture. hope to get comments to improve. thanks!

 

yehosaphat

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Oct 28, 2005
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#3
Your shot would have improved drastically if you had someone in this pic as a focal point and a refernce to scale.
 

Jun 2, 2007
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#4
I think you are trying to use lines when you were composing your pic. Maybe try diagonal lines, ie include more steps and leve the vertical lines to the upper one third of the pic.
 

g-khoo

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Mar 4, 2007
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#7
Wow seriously this is not bad. You managed to capture the building at the right time, giving it faint lights and drop shadows to recreate an old victorian feel.

My only concern is the blank space on the top right. Would've preferred if you filled the frame with the whole building - unless there was a moon on the top right corner - which would make this perfect.

Yes and as yehosaphat has mentioned, having someone in the pic as reference of scale would be nice though i feel its optional.
 

andrewtansj

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Jul 26, 2007
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#8
Wow seriously this is not bad. You managed to capture the building at the right time, giving it faint lights and drop shadows to recreate an old victorian feel.

My only concern is the blank space on the top right. Would've preferred if you filled the frame with the whole building - unless there was a moon on the top right corner - which would make this perfect.

Yes and as yehosaphat has mentioned, having someone in the pic as reference of scale would be nice though i feel its optional.
thanks for your kind compliments and comments. :D
 

9pmnews

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Jun 13, 2007
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#9
Here’s what I would do, but you do need to agree.

1. I would avoid nice angles. With little content, angular shots or styles are just by-products of a picture. They make it easy on the eye. But don’t, usually make good pictures. I would do it straight. More difficult, but also more honest. The problem with shooting buildings is the convergence of vertical lines as the lens is pointed upwards. So if you are serious about architecture work, a view camera with lateral shifts is essential.
2. I would hide the windows behind the second, left column. Shift the tripod a little to the right. When it looks right, it will tell you so. Now you realized an inch difference in camera position can make or break a picture.
3. Cropping - Place a blank card next to the left side of the image. Slowly move the card into the image (shift right) and stop right in the middle of the first, left column. Next, place another blank card next to the right side of the image. Move the card into the image (shift left) and stop where it meets the first ball of the lamp post. Move the card a little more so that it covers about half of that ball. Look at the cropped image. Now you see it is much stronger!
4. I would use the 35mm camera for grab-shots. It is very good at that kind of job. Not so ideal for structural work.

Hope that helps.
 

9pmnews

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Jun 13, 2007
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#10
I mean you do not need to agree. Apology for the typo.
 

Kit

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Jan 19, 2002
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#11
Erm... please get your buildings right. This is the City Hall, not the old Supreme Court. As such, your title is not appropriate anymore. I'm surprised no one picked it up already.
 

andrewtansj

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Jul 26, 2007
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#12
Erm... please get your buildings right. This is the City Hall, not the old Supreme Court. As such, your title is not appropriate anymore. I'm surprised no one picked it up already.
oops... you are right... supreme court is beside... hah...thanks for the enlightenment... so embarassing :embrass:
 

andrewtansj

Senior Member
Jul 26, 2007
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#13
Here’s what I would do, but you do need to agree.

1. I would avoid nice angles. With little content, angular shots or styles are just by-products of a picture. They make it easy on the eye. But don’t, usually make good pictures. I would do it straight. More difficult, but also more honest. The problem with shooting buildings is the convergence of vertical lines as the lens is pointed upwards. So if you are serious about architecture work, a view camera with lateral shifts is essential.
2. I would hide the windows behind the second, left column. Shift the tripod a little to the right. When it looks right, it will tell you so. Now you realized an inch difference in camera position can make or break a picture.
3. Cropping - Place a blank card next to the left side of the image. Slowly move the card into the image (shift right) and stop right in the middle of the first, left column. Next, place another blank card next to the right side of the image. Move the card into the image (shift left) and stop where it meets the first ball of the lamp post. Move the card a little more so that it covers about half of that ball. Look at the cropped image. Now you see it is much stronger!
4. I would use the 35mm camera for grab-shots. It is very good at that kind of job. Not so ideal for structural work.

Hope that helps.
wow... thanks for the comments... very technical... hope i have digested it...:D
 

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