Noise performance: D750 VS D810


erictan8888

Senior Member
Nov 9, 2004
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#1
hi all,

like to ask any CSers who have used the D750 and D810 enough to share what the noise performance is like?
Is the D750 what they say on the web? A one to one and a half stop better than the D810 ?
in the iso1600 to iso6400 range...

Like to hear some feedback before parting with my money :)

thanks :)
 

jopel

Senior Member
Dec 21, 2004
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#6
D700 naills exposure with or without using flash.

D750 1 - 2 stops under. When using flash, esp on ttl it is hit or miss to get exposure right.

It could be my copy having this isolated problem.
 

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daredevil123

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Oct 25, 2005
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lil red dot
#8
D700 naills exposure with or without using flash.

D750 1 - 2 stops under. When using flash, esp on ttl it is hit or miss to get exposure right.

It could be my copy having this isolated problem.
What is the perfect exposure? It is very relative actually. In the end the exposure compensation control is there for a reason.
 

jopel

Senior Member
Dec 21, 2004
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#9
What is the perfect exposure? It is very relative actually. In the end the exposure compensation control is there for a reason.
No not about perfect exposure. But it does matter when you deliver jpeg images on the spot to your client.

I'm comparing 2 cams with the same reading off the gray card but images from D750 came out underexpose, even I fine tune the exposure by +1 and D750 custom white balance always has more Red, from RGB reading.

I am wondering is this an isolated case.
 

daredevil123

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lil red dot
#11
No not about perfect exposure. But it does matter when you deliver jpeg images on the spot to your client.

I'm comparing 2 cams with the same reading off the gray card but images from D750 came out underexpose, even I fine tune the exposure by +1 and D750 custom white balance always has more Red, from RGB reading.

I am wondering is this an isolated case.
Every generation of camera, every brand of camera, it is different how exposure is measured. The sensor may also be more or less sensitive. Seeing how you fixed the exposure variables, what you see is the difference in how the sensor reacts. Traditionally, Nikon's sensor has always been more sensitive (brighter image yield) when compared to Canon. For D750, it seems they tuned it back so it is closer to what Canon is showing now. The key is to understand how your particular camera reacts before going into any paid shoot with deliverables. So you know exactly how to tune that camera to what you or your clients require...

It is not a problem with the camera. It is about knowing the equipment in your hands.

This is an old video showing the differences... although it is between a 5Dmk3 and D800, you can easily see the difference... Ignore the noise performance. Just look at the "brightness"/"exposure" of the scene with the same exposure variables.
[video=youtube;z39UaN0A5Zk]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z39UaN0A5Zk[/video]
 

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jopel

Senior Member
Dec 21, 2004
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#12
Sorry Eric I hijacked your thread.

The key is to understand how your particular camera reacts before going into any paid shoot with deliverables. So you know exactly how to tune that camera to what you or your clients require...


That is the reason I'm running the test. The D700 meter reading never fails me. Whereas I have to turn the D750 steering to the right in order to drive straight. Mount the SB900 flash set it to ttl, the nightmare begin. I have to use M for flash.

D700 OOC readings, 99.9% nail it -
 

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daredevil123

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lil red dot
#13
Sorry Eric I hijacked your thread.





That is the reason I'm running the test. The D700 meter reading never fails me. Whereas I have to turn the D750 steering to the right in order to drive straight. Mount the SB900 flash set it to ttl, the nightmare begin. I have to use M for flash.

D700 OOC readings, 99.9% nail it -
Like I said. Nothing to do with metering. You fixed the exposure variables for shots from both D700 and D750. By doing that, you took metering out of the picture. Metering only determines what exposure variables to use but you fixed that already. The difference you are seeing is the gain of the sensor. Your examples show more of the sensor gain output, not a shift in metering results.

If you know the gain of the sensor is slightly lower, then up the EV. If using flash, you should be in M mode anyway, that is the proper way to shoot. You can still control flash exposure via EV compensation. With a new sensor, things change. As photographers who want to use new technology, we need to adjust our shooting to match that. Just like how D700 (to me)shoots brighter, I usually have to down my EV to -0.3 to -0.7EV in most normal straight forward conditions. It becomes less of a problem with D800 and D4 with more accurate metering. So you see it is all about preferences. About nailing it or not, it is relative in the end. What one regards as perfect exposure, may not be perfect to another.
 

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jopel

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Dec 21, 2004
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#14
Like I said. Nothing to do with metering. You fixed the exposure variables for shots from both D700 and D750. By doing that, you took metering out of the picture. Metering only determines what exposure variables to use but you fixed that already. The difference you are seeing is the gain of the sensor. Your examples show more of the sensor gain output, not a shift in metering results.

If you know the gain of the sensor is slightly lower, then up the EV. If using flash, you should be in M mode anyway, that is the proper way to shoot. You can still control flash exposure via EV compensation. With a new sensor, things change. As photographers who want to use new technology, we need to adjust our shooting to match that. Just like how D700 (to me)shoots brighter, I usually have to down my EV to -0.3 to -0.7EV in most normal straight forward conditions. It becomes less of a problem with D800 and D4 with more accurate metering. So you see it is all about preferences. About nailing it or not, it is relative in the end. What one regards as perfect exposure, may not be perfect to another.
Thanks for the infos. I mean my flash has to be set to M. My cam always on M. I know little about digital camera and metering system, but I never expect that I always have to dial in 2 stops from camera meter reading to take a shot, that including the reading from my sekonic. Really, something new to me.
 

MachBot

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Nov 1, 2012
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#15
Like I said. Nothing to do with metering. You fixed the exposure variables for shots from both D700 and D750. By doing that, you took metering out of the picture. Metering only determines what exposure variables to use but you fixed that already. The difference you are seeing is the gain of the sensor. Your examples show more of the sensor gain output, not a shift in metering results.

If you know the gain of the sensor is slightly lower, then up the EV. If using flash, you should be in M mode anyway, that is the proper way to shoot. You can still control flash exposure via EV compensation. With a new sensor, things change. As photographers who want to use new technology, we need to adjust our shooting to match that. Just like how D700 (to me)shoots brighter, I usually have to down my EV to -0.3 to -0.7EV in most normal straight forward conditions. It becomes less of a problem with D800 and D4 with more accurate metering. So you see it is all about preferences. About nailing it or not, it is relative in the end. What one regards as perfect exposure, may not be perfect to another.
You look stupid in this thread.

If TTL works on the D700, I don't see why it shouldn't work on the D750. If he likes to shoot in TTL mode when using speedlites and his clients are satisfied with his work, then so be it.
 

daredevil123

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lil red dot
#16
You look stupid in this thread.

If TTL works on the D700, I don't see why it shouldn't work on the D750. If he likes to shoot in TTL mode when using speedlites and his clients are satisfied with his work, then so be it.
Camera in M mode dude.

TS just said he has a problem with the D750 in TTL... We are having a discussion to find out the problem. And here you are trying to take pot shots at me.

Then again, what do I know. You must be the resident expert here? I don't see you coming in and giving some advice? oh wait... you are a Canon user, and you are here stirring?
 

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daredevil123

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lil red dot
#17
Thanks for the infos. I mean my flash has to be set to M. My cam always on M. I know little about digital camera and metering system, but I never expect that I always have to dial in 2 stops from camera meter reading to take a shot, that including the reading from my sekonic. Really, something new to me.
If you know your flash is under exposing by 1 or 1.5 stops, keeping the cam in M mode, you can dial EV up 1 or 1.5 stops. Or alternatively you can up 1 to 1.5 stops more in FV in your flash. Problem solved. BTW, you need to make sure you are in Matrix metering when using TTL. From D200 onwards, flash meter has changed its behavior somewhat. Nikon never really share documentation on the behaviors but it is apparent from many other discussions. It will be no surprise if it more changes came in... who knows? But the defacto standard in Nikon TTL-BL is to make sure your metering is in matrix, camera in M mode. Then you can dial any flash adjustments using the EV compensation on the camera very quickly.

BTW, from your examples I cannot see more than 1 stop of difference. Care to share some tests with TTL flash?
 

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erictan8888

Senior Member
Nov 9, 2004
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#19
Any side by side comparison of d750 and D810 for the same scene would be appreciated... For iso from iso1600 to iso6400...
Thinking of getting the d750 on the claims from many reviewers that d750 is better by one to one and a half stop than the D810...
Also contemplating the df... But this camera kenna bashed by a lot of people on the Web... Have tried it at nikon service centre... Looks good to me but no in depth usage as of now...

Would appreciate any input from csers..
 

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