nikon VR, how does it work??


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tengcc

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Jul 31, 2006
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#1
Hi Bros, just got my 18-200VR lens today. Tried it on my D80, the VR don't seems to be working. How do I know whether my current setting on my D80 is set wrongly or the lens is not working? Appreciate your advise. Was told that when you zoom the lens, it will permit some kind of sound. But mine is so quiet. Pls help.

Thanks
Collin:cry:
 

ExplorerZ

Senior Member
Jan 9, 2006
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hkchew03.deviantart.com
#2
Hi Bros, just got my 18-200VR lens today. Tried it on my D80, the VR don't seems to be working. How do I know whether my current setting on my D80 is set wrongly or the lens is not working? Appreciate your advise. Was told that when you zoom the lens, it will permit some kind of sound. But mine is so quiet. Pls help.

Thanks
Collin:cry:
how do you know it is not working when you do not know how it even work? :dunno:
and btw i don zoom will make the VR cause any sound.
 

Mar 13, 2007
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Atlanta, GA
#3
Hi Bros, just got my 18-200VR lens today. Tried it on my D80, the VR don't seems to be working. How do I know whether my current setting on my D80 is set wrongly or the lens is not working? Appreciate your advise. Was told that when you zoom the lens, it will permit some kind of sound. But mine is so quiet. Pls help.

Thanks
Collin:cry:
its when you shake it compensates...

http://nikonimaging.com/global/technology/vr/index.htm

not when you zoom it starts... adapting..
 

Squid

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Jun 10, 2004
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#4
..... Tried it on my D80, the VR don't seems to be working. How do I know whether my current setting on my D80 is set wrongly or the lens is not working? ...... Was told that when you zoom the lens, it will permit some kind of sound. But mine is so quiet.
If you have switched on to activate the VR on the lens, then you should hear a click sound when you half-pressed the shutter release button the camera body. The click sound comes from the VR unit engaging when you half-pressed the shutter release button and dis-engaging when you lift up your finger from the half-pressed shutter release button.

The other way is to compare the image at long focal length with or without VR engaged when viewed from the DSLR view finder. From my exprience, the images is more stable when VR is engaged.

This topic was discussed in previous thread at http://forum.clubsnap.com/showthread.php?t=217394
 

#6
Vibration Reduction aka VR, works on the principle of counteracting motion. There are Gyroscopes mounted within the VR lenses, this device is capable of detecting pitch, roll and yaw, commonly used in aircrafts and helicopters. Traditional implementations of gyroscopes involves a rotating disc or mass where the centrifugal force is balanced from the axis where it is spinning on. Modern gyroscopes are implemented electronically rather than mechanical form.

When VR is activated, the gyroscope mounted within the lens detects movements at fast and regular intervals. The movement differences are used to control actuators within the lenses to counteract your motion and keep the image stable.

The "brain" that controls how much to counteract makes use of algorithms commonly used in the field of control engineering such as "Proportional, Integral and Differential Control" aka PID and training via Neural Nets. Such algorithms are intelligent enough to compensate and sometimes even predict behaviour and compensate in advance.

When you make use of VR, you do note that there is a settling time when your VR kicks in on 1/2 depressing the shutter. So don't just snap away immediately. Hope this helps :)
 

tengcc

New Member
Jul 31, 2006
165
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#7
Vibration Reduction aka VR, works on the principle of counteracting motion. There are Gyroscopes mounted within the VR lenses, this device is capable of detecting pitch, roll and yaw, commonly used in aircrafts and helicopters. Traditional implementations of gyroscopes involves a rotating disc or mass where the centrifugal force is balanced from the axis where it is spinning on. Modern gyroscopes are implemented electronically rather than mechanical form.

When VR is activated, the gyroscope mounted within the lens detects movements at fast and regular intervals. The movement differences are used to control actuators within the lenses to counteract your motion and keep the image stable.

The "brain" that controls how much to counteract makes use of algorithms commonly used in the field of control engineering such as "Proportional, Integral and Differential Control" aka PID and training via Neural Nets. Such algorithms are intelligent enough to compensate and sometimes even predict behaviour and compensate in advance.

When you make use of VR, you do note that there is a settling time when your VR kicks in on 1/2 depressing the shutter. So don't just snap away immediately. Hope this helps :)
Thanks to all the bros for yr detailed explaination which has been very informative for me. Appreciate your help. Cheers. :thumbsup:
 

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