nikon capture NX


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jeanie

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May 19, 2005
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#1
if i shoot in RAW, and process the pics in NX, i can only change the WB to those 'presets WB'?as in sunlight, shade, tungsten,fluorescent ....and such?:dunno:

is it possible to alter the WB to get values 'in between'?or to a specific k temp?

TIA
 

jnet6

Senior Member
Apr 21, 2004
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#2
Yes it can...
go select 2nd drop tab from "recorded value" or "use grey point"
to calcutate automatically or any nearest WB "daylight... etc"
then you can change to K' temp at fine adjustment below.
 

jeanie

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May 19, 2005
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#3
Yes it can...
go select 2nd drop tab from "recorded value" or "use grey point"
to calcutate automatically or any nearest WB "daylight... etc"
then you can change to K' temp at fine adjustment below.

thanks.someone mentioned to me i can use a WB card and shoot an image of it under same lighting.
any idea where to get one?

i know there's expodisc but at 250, i'm not so willing to get it.:dunno:
 

yyD70S

Senior Member
Dec 25, 2005
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#4
Thing they are referring to the WhitBal Gray Card.

http://www.rawworkflow.com/products/whibal/index.html




thanks.someone mentioned to me i can use a WB card and shoot an image of it under same lighting.
any idea where to get one?

i know there's expodisc but at 250, i'm not so willing to get it.:dunno:
 

jnet6

Senior Member
Apr 21, 2004
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#6
thanks.someone mentioned to me i can use a WB card and shoot an image of it under same lighting.
any idea where to get one?

i know there's expodisc but at 250, i'm not so willing to get it.:dunno:
WB on D200 is quite gd... try shooting in K'5300
adjust according from there...

a cheaper way to get correct WB, bring anything that is grey and shoot with the picture. eg. grey shirt.
or anything that you see is grey from "nature"/surroundings compose inside the pic.
 

Michael

New Member
Apr 5, 2005
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Thailand
www.pbase.com
#7
WB on D200 is quite gd... try shooting in K'5300
adjust according from there...

a cheaper way to get correct WB, bring anything that is grey and shoot with the picture. eg. grey shirt.
or anything that you see is grey from "nature"/surroundings compose inside the pic.
Does not really work, since a lot of greys are not grey but have some colour cast... it throws your WB off...
 

azul123

Senior Member
Dec 4, 2004
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Eastern Bloc
#8
a cheaper way to get correct WB, bring anything that is grey and shoot with the picture. eg. grey shirt.
or anything that you see is grey from "nature"/surroundings compose inside the pic.
There are those 18% grey and then there are those that advocate using 12% grey, there is a specific reason with them, but me not technical enough to explain... cannot just pick any grey else like the above CSer said colour cast exist.

And to set in-camera Custom WB for Nikon cameras I read you have to fill the grey card in the entire viewfinder whereas Canon just need to fill more then half ok liow, no flames please.. thi is what I heard only from someone conducting in a class and I don't have Canon DSLR to validate.

For Colour Temperature adjustments, I found this table quite ok.

1000K Candles; oil lamps
2000K Very early sunrise; low effect tungsten lamps
2500K Household light bulbs
3000K Studio lights, photo floods
4000K Clear flashbulbs
5000K Typical daylight; electronic flash
5500K The sun at noon,
6000K Bright sunshine with clear sky
7000K Slightly overcast sky
8000K Hazy sky
9000K Open shade on clear day
10,000K Heavily overcast sky
11,000K Sunless blue skies
20,000+K Open shade in mountains on a really clear day

P.S. adjust accordingly, as these are referencing US skies.

../azul123
 

azul123

Senior Member
Dec 4, 2004
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#9
But...

If you are shooting in a complex lighting condition, a White Balance reference card will make your post processing work so much easier, I think those wedding photographers may offer some help how they shoot in mixture of Video lights, flourescent and neon lighting.

Oh almost forgot, in the above lighting condition plus you are shooting with flash, that is where it makes sense to have good WB reference help.

../azul123
 

jeanie

Senior Member
May 19, 2005
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#10
But...

If you are shooting in a complex lighting condition, a White Balance reference card will make your post processing work so much easier, I think those wedding photographers may offer some help how they shoot in mixture of Video lights, flourescent and neon lighting.

Oh almost forgot, in the above lighting condition plus you are shooting with flash, that is where it makes sense to have good WB reference help.

../azul123
give me time to digest....i had soooooo many PMs and msgs to read.
thanks for all the explanantion.;)
 

gooseberry

Senior Member
Mar 11, 2004
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Central West
#11
But...

If you are shooting in a complex lighting condition, a White Balance reference card will make your post processing work so much easier, I think those wedding photographers may offer some help how they shoot in mixture of Video lights, flourescent and neon lighting.

Oh almost forgot, in the above lighting condition plus you are shooting with flash, that is where it makes sense to have good WB reference help.

../azul123
Do take note when you are using Capture NX and using this method of taking one picture with a white balance reference card and in post processing in NX copy the corrected white balance from the corrected image to other images in the series - there is a flaw in the NX white balance in that it uses relative white balance correction and not absolute. Nikon Capture 4 and Adobe Camera Raw do it correctly and use absolute white balance.
 

azul123

Senior Member
Dec 4, 2004
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Eastern Bloc
#12
Do take note when you are using Capture NX and using this method of taking one picture with a white balance reference card and in post processing in NX copy the corrected white balance from the corrected image to other images in the series - there is a flaw in the NX white balance in that it uses relative white balance correction and not absolute. Nikon Capture 4 and Adobe Camera Raw do it correctly and use absolute white balance.
Thanks Bro, this is good to know in advance. Hmmm... maybe should stick using in Adobe instead, can't find books on Capture NX that is out on the shelf, so far one kind soul have PM an eBook, but I am old fashion prefer to read in paper form.

../azul123
 

gooseberry

Senior Member
Mar 11, 2004
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#13
Thanks Bro, this is good to know in advance. Hmmm... maybe should stick using in Adobe instead, can't find books on Capture NX that is out on the shelf, so far one kind soul have PM an eBook, but I am old fashion prefer to read in paper form.

../azul123
No worries mate. Yeah, unfortunately with NX being so new, not many books out there. I've only heard of an eBook, but haven't actually seen it, is it any good ?
 

gooseberry

Senior Member
Mar 11, 2004
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#14
Thanks Bro, this is good to know in advance. Hmmm... maybe should stick using in Adobe instead
../azul123
Having said that though, I still prefer the rendering of the output from NEFs converted with NX and Capture 4 over Adobe Camera Raw using the defaults. You can get good quality out of ACR, but it's too much hard work to get the right settings, and I can't be bothered trying to calibrate it - too lazy ;p
 

eclectyx

New Member
Mar 4, 2004
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#15
There are those 18% grey and then there are those that advocate using 12% grey, there is a specific reason with them, but me not technical enough to explain... cannot just pick any grey else like the above CSer said colour cast exist.
The percentage of grey is not important. 12% and 18% are calibrated for exposure measurements, not WB. You can use anything neutral, i.e. any shade between pure white and black, although from a practical standpoint, it has to be closer to white than black.

The problem is that what appears grey or white is usually has some residual colour, but we do not "see" it. So picking any old piece of cardboard or plastic might give you a non-neutral reference WB point.

On the other hand, unless you really need very accurate colour (eg. product/advertising photography), there is usually some leeway. If you think about it, in the film days, Kodak films were considered "warm", while Fujifilms were "cool". Same thing now. Some folks prefer a warmer look, some a cooler look. That is why you can get another type of WB reference product called "Warm Cards". These are cards of several shades of blue. If you set WB with a pale blue card as the reference item, the final image will become slightly warm.

You can experiment with a few items to use as your own WB reference card, and see what "look" you like. I am currently trying a piece of "bright white" perspex, which is probably a tiny bit on the "cool white" side. Gives a small warm bias to the WB. So you can actually gather your own set of WB cards this way.

Generally, as long as you use the same WB reference item, you will still get consistent WB in all your shots, even if this WB is not spectrally accurate.

Anyway Jeanie, to clarify, there are two main ways to set WB:

1) You can photograph your subject with at least one test shot with a WB reference item somewhere in the picture. eg. the WhiBal card or some other neutral matt item. Then you use Capture NX, PhotoShop or other software in post-production to "pick" the neutral white/grey point from that object using the colour dropper. Known as "setting the grey point". Then applying the same adjustment to all the rest of your pictures taken in the exactly the same lighting.

2) You can "set custom WB" in-camera by selecting to "Pre" in WB. Press and hold the WB button until the "Pre" flashes in the LCD panel, fill the frame with a WB reference item that is lit in the same lighting as your subject, then press the shutter release. No photo is recorded, but the Custom (preset) WB is set.

For JPEGs, method 2 is preferable for accurate colours, since the image is captured and recorded in the correct WB. Method 1 can possibly result in some loss in quality and colour accuracy in the corrected image since the captured image needs to be PP to alter the colour balance. Of course, for RAW, either way works fine. YMMV. :)
 

azul123

Senior Member
Dec 4, 2004
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Eastern Bloc
#16
The percentage of grey is not important. 12% and 18% are calibrated for exposure measurements, not WB. You can use anything neutral, i.e. any shade between pure white and black, although from a practical standpoint, it has to be closer to white than black.

The problem is that what appears grey or white is usually has some residual colour, but we do not "see" it. So picking any old piece of cardboard or plastic might give you a non-neutral reference WB point.

On the other hand, unless you really need very accurate colour (eg. product/advertising photography), there is usually some leeway. If you think about it, in the film days, Kodak films were considered "warm", while Fujifilms were "cool". Same thing now. Some folks prefer a warmer look, some a cooler look. That is why you can get another type of WB reference product called "Warm Cards". These are cards of several shades of blue. If you set WB with a pale blue card as the reference item, the final image will become slightly warm.

You can experiment with a few items to use as your own WB reference card, and see what "look" you like. I am currently trying a piece of "bright white" perspex, which is probably a tiny bit on the "cool white" side. Gives a small warm bias to the WB. So you can actually gather your own set of WB cards this way.

Generally, as long as you use the same WB reference item, you will still get consistent WB in all your shots, even if this WB is not spectrally accurate.
:thumbsup:

Very informative and concise.

../azul123
 

jeanie

Senior Member
May 19, 2005
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#17
i shoot more of jpeg.
even though i have nikon capture.but seriously, i HATE the interface.
i had only use the program to play around less than 5 times.:embrass:

btw, sgp cant buy WB card?must order overseas?aiyo.so troublesome lei!
 

jnet6

Senior Member
Apr 21, 2004
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not here often anymore
#18
i shoot more of jpeg.
even though i have nikon capture.but seriously, i HATE the interface.
i had only use the program to play around less than 5 times.:embrass:

btw, sgp cant buy WB card?must order overseas?aiyo.so troublesome lei!
Seriously, use manual K' temp from your camera and see it right away.
so that your jpg will be able to process straight away...

save your $$ for other things.
 

jeanie

Senior Member
May 19, 2005
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#19
Seriously, use manual K' temp from your camera and see it right away.
so that your jpg will be able to process straight away...

save your $$ for other things.
prob is when i see on the d200 LCD screen.sometimes it looks ok till i upload the pics.
damn frustrating.:angry:
 

jnet6

Senior Member
Apr 21, 2004
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not here often anymore
#20
prob is when i see on the d200 LCD screen.sometimes it looks ok till i upload the pics.
damn frustrating.:angry:
Is your screen calibrated???

This may be the problem, or have you take your pic direct print from labs and compare to camera LCD and computer LCD?
 

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