Night Photography


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marklim

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Jan 4, 2006
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Hi guys,

This is my first try on night photography. Sadly, i did not bring along a tripod. I was using my 350D with kit lens. :embrass:

This was the best that i could do. Although i'm very disappointed on what i've shot. But i've decided to put it up so that i can improve. :(

Kindly post all your comments and tell me how i can improve.

Sorry For The OFF and HandShake As I had to handhold the camera.

Hope to get some comments on what aperture i should use and where should i focus on ?

Thank you,
Mark

#1

#2
 

Francis247

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Jul 10, 2005
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Hi Mark,

Interesting shot you got there, it is a real pity you didn't bring your tripod.

Anyway, as a rule of thumb, to avoid handshake, try to use the shutter speed which is 1/focal length. If you are using a telephoto lens @ 300mm, then your shutter speed should be at least 1/300 for faster. To compensate for the fast shutter speed, try to increase your aperture or increase ISO (but not more than 400) to get a good exposure. Try to experiment, but it will be better with a tripod.

As for #5, there is a distinct flare caused by lights at the Padang field, try to use a hood if possible to avoid this or use a filter. Good attempt anyway. :thumbsup:
 

Kit

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Jan 19, 2002
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Good attempt for a 1st timer.

#1 - If you are shooting your buildings head on, never crop off the top unless you've designed your images in that manner which I don't think is so in this case.

#2 - Lopsided composition with bits of building creeping in at the edge.

#3 - Not a particularly interesting image. Lacks a factor to grab the eye and impact.

#4 - Again, watch out for foreign objects e.g. trees creeping in from the side. Move in for a more dynamic composition for taller buildings.

#5 - Flare as mentioned. Also watch out for the blown out highlights on the field. Good timing for the buildings. Still can make out the details with the night lights.

I'll continue later.
 

obewan

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Feb 11, 2005
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Can see many repeated pics of the same scene.
No issue here, coz that prove that you keep on trying to get your picture right for that same scene. That is the spirit :thumbsup:

Anything, more than 1/60s should not be handheld. Depend on your hand steadiness.
Some photographers are pretty good and can go lower.
No tripod, nevermind. Try to make use of any stable platform available and place your camera there for support. That will help a bit.
 

marklim

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Jan 4, 2006
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Francis247 said:
Hi Mark,

Interesting shot you got there, it is a real pity you didn't bring your tripod.

Anyway, as a rule of thumb, to avoid handshake, try to use the shutter speed which is 1/focal length. If you are using a telephoto lens @ 300mm, then your shutter speed should be at least 1/300 for faster. To compensate for the fast shutter speed, try to increase your aperture or increase ISO (but not more than 400) to get a good exposure. Try to experiment, but it will be better with a tripod.

As for #5, there is a distinct flare caused by lights at the Padang field, try to use a hood if possible to avoid this or use a filter. Good attempt anyway. :thumbsup:
Yeah.. Knew Bout that. But... still tried my luck. *no choice* :(

Kit said:
#1 - If you are shooting your buildings head on, never crop off the top unless you've designed your images in that manner which I don't think is so in this case.
It was because i went forward and my lens could not cover much enough. I went forward because i wanted to lean on the railing. :embrass:

Anyway, why after i enlarge the pics to look at it in my com, it does not appear sharp ? Can anyone tell me if a f/3.5 is acceptable for this kind of pics ? or a minimum of f/8 ? And which part should i set the focus to ? center of the building ? or the left ? or the right ?

Thank You,
Mark
 

Kit

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Jan 19, 2002
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#6 - Slanting buildings. Granted, you might not be able to align your camera dead parallel to the buildings.

#7 - Nice colours but again take note of objects creeping into the picture at the sides. Little details which are often overlooked will make or spoil a picture.

#8 - Can try taking this one a little earlier with enough light to bring out some details of the buildings in the background.

My comments for the above more or less applies to the rest of your pictures. Care in designing your composition, exposure, slanting buildings, etc and yes please bring along a tripod for night photography of this nature. To me, its just a waste of time doing night shots without a decent tripod.
 

Simon_84

Senior Member
Mar 18, 2004
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actually some shots will be blur even if your holding technique is damn steady.
but for a dslr which is heavy,you should have try to hold your breath before snapping a picture or maybe hold your camera in a better way to reduce the amount of blur images.

maybe i'm the only crazy one trying to take night photos without tripod.
 

Kit

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Jan 19, 2002
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marklim said:
Yeah.. Knew Bout that. But... still tried my luck. *no choice* :(



It was because i went forward and my lens could not cover much enough. I went forward because i wanted to lean on the railing. :embrass:

Anyway, why after i enlarge the pics to look at it in my com, it does not appear sharp ? Can anyone tell me if a f/3.5 is acceptable for this kind of pics ? or a minimum of f/8 ? And which part should i set the focus to ? center of the building ? or the left ? or the right ?

Thank You,
Mark
No offence but if that's the case, I wouldn't even think of taking that shot in the first place.

For scenic shots, you need enough DOF to capture the details and f3.5 is definitely short. Your settings will vary from picture to picture but f8 is a good start.
 

jbma

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Dec 28, 2003
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Kit said:
No offence but if that's the case, I wouldn't even think of taking that shot in the first place.

For scenic shots, you need enough DOF to capture the details and f3.5 is definitely short. Your settings will vary from picture to picture but f8 is a good start.
Totally agree with Kit. Night shots without tripod is a no no.
 

marklim

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Jan 4, 2006
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Bukit Timah
actually. i didn't think of taking night shots yesterday. it was just tat i happened to have my camera with me and my dad drove past there. then i asked him to stop and let me try try abit. btw.. i saw someone taking the parliament house yesterday. looks professional. anyone nearby around 7.30 - 8 taking photos of the parliament house ?? :D
 

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