Newbie to shooting studio. tips appreciated


Shizuma

Senior Member
Mar 19, 2012
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#1
hello seniors and sifus.

please advise this little kitty
what to look out for in shooting at studio.
I have been invited to shoot at one and don't wish to embarrass myself.
 

Shizuma

Senior Member
Mar 19, 2012
2,557
25
0
#2
hello seniors and sifus.

please advise this little kitty
what to look out for in shooting at studio.
I have been invited to shoot at a studio session and don't wish to embarrass myself.
 

catchlights

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 27, 2004
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#3
what are you shooting?

1. use custom WB, never never on auto WB
2, check your sync speed, one two stops below max sync speed is fine, some triggers can be a little bit slow.
3. don't need to rush, the light will not change,
4, don't bang bang bang non stop, the strobe need time to recycle, and you don't want to blown their flash tube too.
5, use lens hood
6, take break
 

paulboh87

New Member
Dec 23, 2012
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#5
keep talking to the model. make good topics, make her happy and relax
 

Shizuma

Senior Member
Mar 19, 2012
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#6
thank you sifu and sempai please teach me more
 

one eye jack

Senior Member
Jun 11, 2011
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#8
keep talking to the model. make good topics, make her happy and relax
I don't think this is practical unless all shooters agree to be democratic and take turns to direct model.It can also be distracting for model.The organiser should moderate somewhat so everyone gets fair share.



Shizuma



Re: Newbie to shooting studio. tips appreciated
thank you sifu and sempai please teach me more
Judging from your hyperlinks you are a portrait virgin but seriously there's a first time for everyone.Typically in an organised studio shoot the lighting has been "fixed" and setup so everyone
shoot like drawing still life in art class except from different angles so pictures end up similiar.It depends on what the organiser wants to offer and "teach".If it's lighting setup then there will be demo on basic lighting so changing lights for effect.

On your part I suggest you read up on portrait photography and watch youtube videos.Remember you
are shooting a portrait that means "portraying the subject,male or female in good light pun intended.
You don't need a pro camera but the right lens.If you just have a kit lens then use the longest end which can be 55mm onwards.This is to prevent optical distortion of model's face etc.

Now the work/fun begins, prepare you gear and settings.Observe or evaluate the model,look at face,shape of it.Is it the model type - oval shape (should be because organiser don't want you to fail).
Are there any imperfections or features that need creative "hiding".The colour and style of clothing
(depends on the theme of the shoot).How to get best overall look and pose (full length).You can direct the model somewhat like where to look,place hands and legs etc.What facial expressions if model is cooperative but in general expect magazine type facial expressions or pose.

How your photos turn out depends on whether you know how light behaves again read up.It is light and shadows that give form and shape to an object so a human being is no different.Observe how light falls on the model and taking into account of model's facial and body features.Direct model or move him/her so the light gives model the best possible "contouring" meaning best look that pleases the eye.If you can do this you have succeeded in this assignment. :)PS in this type of shoot,the lighting is such that it is
bright and all details are "revealed" so lens will capture all so hard to fail but if
you want something "artistic" then you must be observant and "see" what should not be seen
and take appropriate action.
 

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Shizuma

Senior Member
Mar 19, 2012
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#9
my invite give me exclusive time and control as if I were solo. that's why I'm nervous
 

daredevil123

Moderator
Staff member
Oct 25, 2005
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lil red dot
#10
my invite give me exclusive time and control as if I were solo. that's why I'm nervous
Time to watch some youtube videos... here is a good start.

[video=youtube;uH84-pA7p-c]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uH84-pA7p-c[/video]
 

Zeisser

Senior Member
Jul 12, 2008
2,654
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Tampines
www.flickr.com
#11
my invite give me exclusive time and control as if I were solo. that's why I'm nervous

So much better if you are in control of the shoot. As bro Daredevil123 mentioned watch some studio shoot videos
and get tips from there on placing the lights. Studio lights gives you better control on how you want the light
to fall on your subject via the modelling lamp. Unless it's just flashguns mounted on stands to bounce light off
umbrella or litebox then it's another scenario. But in this digital era this should not be a problem coz there's
always playback for checking.

Do try your best as it's a learning process don't be nervous just give your all. Good luck :)
 

one eye jack

Senior Member
Jun 11, 2011
816
12
18
#12
my invite give me exclusive time and control as if I were solo. that's why I'm nervous
Understandable but please not in front of model.If you know what you want it's not a problem.Firstly even for a model they want to be photographed beautifully so your nervousness will affect her mood and confidence and the final
outcome or results of the session.

The video provided by daredevil123 is all you need (for now) and not likely to fail.:)So do Rembrandt,butterfly and side lighting with fill light (reflector).

Most newbies don't appreciate the importance of model management as it relates to nervousness.Handle your gear confidently.Introduce yourself and make pleasantries,give positive feedback of your work and comments never negative ones.Let model know what you want to do as it helps her know that she is doing the right thing for you rather than speculating in her beautiful mind or sitting there wondering.Below is something copied for reference.
Good luck.

4) Direct Your Subject With Confidence.

You should make sure you give your client plenty of feedback and encouragement during the shoot. She needs to know where she stands with you at all times. Your silence while shooting will only make room in her head for questions about her pose, expression, and whether or not she�s doing a good job in front of the camera. Letting her know what to do and how well she�s doing it, will help make her a better and happier subject.

Encouragement starts the moment she arrives for the shoot. Tell her that she looks great, and that you know the photos will turn out wonderfully. During the shoot you have to be her cheerleader of sorts; tell her how great she’s doing every so often.

Understand that she is looking to you for direction. You might be focused and concentrating on a series of shots that look just great from your perspective, but without letting her know what you’re doing, she’ll be lost. She’ll wonder if she’s supposed to be smiling or not, or where her hands should be placed, or which direction she’s supposed to be looking in. So, give her confidence by giving her solid direction throughout. If there are times that you just need her to keep doing what she’s doing while you get some different angles, just tell her so. It will go a long way in keeping her relaxed, engaged, and confident. How well you manage this will show in the final shots.
 

Shizuma

Senior Member
Mar 19, 2012
2,557
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0
#13
thank you for help
I also have a question... is my rebel series Canon 'good enough ' for studio?
 

Zeisser

Senior Member
Jul 12, 2008
2,654
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38
Tampines
www.flickr.com
#14
thank you for help
I also have a question... is my rebel series Canon 'good enough ' for studio

Actually not much a problem if you know your camera well. Had viewed thru your
cat series using the manual Pentacon lens. Preferably you should use an AF lens on your shoot
rather than a manual one unless you have mastered it.
 

Shizuma

Senior Member
Mar 19, 2012
2,557
25
0
#15
for the sake of capturing spontaneous moment I will never use manual focus in studio. I'm just too slow for that
 

daredevil123

Moderator
Staff member
Oct 25, 2005
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lil red dot
#16
thank you for help
I also have a question... is my rebel series Canon 'good enough ' for studio?
Most cameras are good enough for studio. In studio you control all the light, so you will most probably be shooting at low iso and small apertures.
 

Cooling

New Member
Jan 30, 2014
20
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Singapore
#18
Most cameras are good enough for studio. In studio you control all the light, so you will most probably be shooting at low iso and small apertures.
Hello Master Daredevil,
I am curious why need to shoot using small aperture... I was thinking as long as the model is in focus and the rest of the background is not really important unless there are details on background which need to be in focus. Can one shoot with bigger aperture to give a softer look? Thks for ur advice. I am also quite new in photography. Thank you thank you.
 

daredevil123

Moderator
Staff member
Oct 25, 2005
21,660
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lil red dot
#19
Hello Master Daredevil,
I am curious why need to shoot using small aperture... I was thinking as long as the model is in focus and the rest of the background is not really important unless there are details on background which need to be in focus. Can one shoot with bigger aperture to give a softer look? Thks for ur advice. I am also quite new in photography. Thank you thank you.
The question is, why do you need to shoot with large aperture? You are controlling all the light in the entire environment. You are also controlling the background, so there is no background to blur out.

Studio strobes are quite powerful. Even the lowest power strobes at lowest setting you should usually be dealing with around F5.6 to F8 for a proper exposure at ISO100.

As for softer feeling. What is softer feeling to you? The softer you want the light, the closer you need to the light to be to the subject. that translate to higher intensity of the light, and an even smaller aperture is needed.

Studio photography is very different from ambient. You need to learn and understand it more.
 

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catchlights

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 27, 2004
21,903
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48
Punggol, Singapore
www.foto-u.com
#20
Hello Master Daredevil,
I am curious why need to shoot using small aperture... I was thinking as long as the model is in focus and the rest of the background is not really important unless there are details on background which need to be in focus. Can one shoot with bigger aperture to give a softer look? Thks for ur advice. I am also quite new in photography. Thank you thank you.
you probably need to use at least ND 8x or higher power lens filter or if you want to shoot wide open aperture, or buy large sheets of ND gel on the studio strobe to cut down some lights.
 

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