Newbie question about lens


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davee78

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Mar 23, 2008
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#1
Sorry for asking a newbie question..I read through the notes section and the links for newbies..(I did my research liao;p)

Got some questions about lens: I have experienced a lot of difficulties in fitting objects in my view, no matter how I adjust physically, am I right to say that the range of my lens can't fit it in? (For example, I am standing at ground of the Singapore flyer, but no matters how I lower or adjust, I can't fit it in the way I wan):sweat: Correct me if I am wrong, but would a say 100mm lens make it easier? I am using prosumer S5 and it's a built in 6mm-72mm lens. Another example, the photo below, I cant fit it also even as i try to adjust physically. I went to the extent of lying it close to the ground but still can't get it in





F/2.8 would mean lens /diameter of aperture rite?, But using f/2.8 or rather low f does not seem to be able to capture objects afar well? Am I right? So if I take scenery or landscape, then F 2.8 may not be too useful??Not sure if this is so:dunno:, because I see F 2.8 lens seems quite commonly used and I was trying to understand in what situation are they useful

(not changing camera though;p, just for knowledge and to find answers to my "field" problems)
 

luna_sea83

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Jul 17, 2005
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#2
Usually for scenery or landscape, aperture used usually would be around least F8 and above, cos u be standing least quite a distance away from the building/scene so u need a deeper DOF.

F2.8 is usually used for potraits and other scene which u might wana focus on a certain object.

Experts, correct me if i am wrong.
 

Mar 22, 2008
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#3
If you need to fit a bigger object into the view, you need to zoom out. ie. A 10mm lens would work a lot better than 100mm for this. If 10mm still cannot, might want to consider the fish-eye lens. Alternatively, just move back / take photos in sections and stitch together.
 

#4
Sorry for asking a newbie question..I read through the notes section and the links for newbies..(I did my research liao;p)

Got some questions about lens: I have experienced a lot of difficulties in fitting objects in my view, no matter how I adjust physically, am I right to say that the range of my lens can't fit it in? (For example, I am standing at ground of the Singapore flyer, but no matters how I lower or adjust, I can't fit it in the way I wan):sweat: Correct me if I am wrong, but would a say 100mm lens make it easier? I am using prosumer S5 and it's a built in 6mm-72mm lens. Another example, the photo below, I cant fit it also even as i try to adjust physically. I went to the extent of lying it close to the ground but still can't get it in
Wow, the way you're phrasing seems pretty chim. ha. anyways. is ur lens 6mm??? that's really super duper wide. and practically u can cover everything you want with that vertically or horizontally. what do you mean you cant fit it the way u want. it doesnt make much of a diff whether you're standing or lying down because it doesnt really make it any wider by alot.
Perhaps you should look at another perspective if you cant get it that way. Try different angles. It may turn out better! Have fun. =D
 

catchlights

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Sep 27, 2004
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#5
put in a simple word, your camera lens is not wide enough, without changing camera, so either you..

go further back until you able to fit your subject in your camera frame.... Or

get a wide angle adapter (I not sure is there any wide angle adapter able to fit on your camera)
 

davee78

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Mar 23, 2008
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#6
hmm, ok, thanks all ....I am going to try it out again (actually, taking in parts and stitching may seems to be the solution, thanks!) I could had stood further away to fit it but then feel got a funny gap between me and the object, so decided against it..Anyway,I just bought S5 for a month, so unlikely to change any time soon;p..going to squeeze more out of it first:) ..as for 6mm -72mm lens, it is printed as so on the camera leh, but i guess it's because there is macro function :dunno:, I am a newbie to lens so I also cannot explain why:sweat:
 

attap seed

Senior Member
Feb 16, 2006
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#8
Usually for scenery or landscape, aperture used usually would be around least F8 and above, cos u be standing least quite a distance away from the building/scene so u need a deeper DOF.

F2.8 is usually used for potraits and other scene which u might wana focus on a certain object.

Experts, correct me if i am wrong.

this explaination is WRONG.
 

luna_sea83

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Jul 17, 2005
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#9
Sorry my bad, not sure on the landscape part.
 

zero o

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Aug 8, 2007
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#10
Despite the fact that it is stated on the S5 lens as 6mm to 72mm, the widest it can zoom out to is only 36mm. A Nikon D200 for instance, when using a Sigma 10-20mm lens has a wide angle coverage of 15mm, as compared to the S5's 36mm. That makes a lot of difference, the S5 in this case may only manage 1/2 the building whereas the Sigma can take the whole building. Hope this clear it up.

If you have the time, you should check out http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/showthread.php?t=364318.
Alternatively Canon also conducts a 2 hour class for Canon customers http://www.canon.com.sg/training-digital/main2.html

These 2 courses will be very useful to get you started on the right track.
 

#11
Sorry my bad, not sure on the landscape part.
Actually that has nothing to do with landscape, but more to do with basic photography (which include things like shutter speed, ISO, composition, etc). The aperture is used to control the amount of light coming into the camera, and is used mainly for the control of the depth of field.

TS, in your case, the photo shows the lens is not wide enough, which is about the focal length and the angle of view. Using your camera, you actually will need to stand back further to capture the whole building. You are standing too near.

For a technical explanation, look here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angle_of_view

For a graphical explanation, look here: http://www.usa.canon.com/app/html/EFLenses101/focal_length.html

Hope this helps. I may not be 100% correct.:embrass:
 

davee78

New Member
Mar 23, 2008
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#12
Yup, I got it now:D Knowing the limits of the lens now in a way help me to try to move around more when I am taking photos now instead of trying to stick to a place and hope the camera can do the work for me...important lesson:sweat: by the way, the usacanon link is good!
 

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