Newbie on Film questions?


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zcf

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Apr 10, 2005
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#1
Film newbie here :embrass: , after trying some digital, now trying some film shots to try to make use of the full frame and colour range. So, some question here.

When to use UV filter on lens of SLR film?
Just wonder is UV filter needed on the lens all the time? Or day time under sun only? Or any specific conditions?

I have a Fish eye lens which can not put UV (or any) filter on :sweat: . So does it mean my film shot will always suffer flare booming? Or I have avoid direct sun or hazy day shot?

Can anyone help me on this newbie queries please?
 

chenwei

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Sep 6, 2002
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#3
UV filter is mainly used for protection purpose, to avoid flare, u should be using lens hood instead.

for fish eye lens, dun think u can put filter, usually got supplied the lens hood one.
 

yanyewkay

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Sep 22, 2004
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#4
chenwei said:
UV filter is mainly used for protection purpose, to avoid flare, u should be using lens hood instead.

for fish eye lens, dun think u can put filter, usually got supplied the lens hood one.
not on film.. they do have practical uses on flim other than to protect the front element commonly known to DSLR users.
 

#5
Fish eye lens have filters fitted on the back end, use polarisers and ND to cut glare and reflections. Some on a clip on film type or small diameter screw ons.

Depending on the type of photos, UV and skylight have a different effect on films. The latter being a little warmer and great for potraits and people. UV filters were originally used on films to cut UV spectrum light into the film emulsion. As film is very UV sensitive, the extra UV can cause over exposure or burn outs in the film emulsion. However, with the more modern and advance film we have today, these factors are hardly encountered as manufacturers have created an anti-UV layer on the film emulsion layer. In fact, any layers of glass reduces UV, the more the merrier.

Hope that explains the why UV or skylight filters were used. The protection thingy was used as an excuse for old habits and traditions though it does serve as some protection for the lenses. I prefer to remove my filters when I shoot in the studio, the glass reduces light transmission and increases the chances of flare and reflections.
 

Snoweagle

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Jan 26, 2005
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#6
zcf said:
Film newbie here :embrass: , after trying some digital, now trying some film shots to try to make use of the full frame and colour range. So, some question here.

When to use UV filter on lens of SLR film?
Just wonder is UV filter needed on the lens all the time? Or day time under sun only? Or any specific conditions?

I have a Fish eye lens which can not put UV (or any) filter on :sweat: . So does it mean my film shot will always suffer flare booming? Or I have avoid direct sun or hazy day shot?

Can anyone help me on this newbie queries please?
UV filters are a must for full-time protection for your lens.

Fish-eyes have rear-fitting filters called gelatin filters.
 

zcf

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#7
tommon said:
Fish eye lens have filters fitted on the back end, use polarisers and ND to cut glare and reflections. Some on a clip on film type or small diameter screw ons.

Depending on the type of photos, UV and skylight have a different effect on films. The latter being a little warmer and great for potraits and people. UV filters were originally used on films to cut UV spectrum light into the film emulsion. As film is very UV sensitive, the extra UV can cause over exposure or burn outs in the film emulsion. However, with the more modern and advance film we have today, these factors are hardly encountered as manufacturers have created an anti-UV layer on the film emulsion layer. In fact, any layers of glass reduces UV, the more the merrier.

Hope that explains the why UV or skylight filters were used. The protection thingy was used as an excuse for old habits and traditions though it does serve as some protection for the lenses. I prefer to remove my filters when I shoot in the studio, the glass reduces light transmission and increases the chances of flare and reflections.
Good to know that nowaday film are not so sensitive to UV. Thanks for the explanation.
I sometime don't use filter also, especially under low light condition, or I think sharpness is essential.

Snoweagle said:
UV filters are a must for full-time protection for your lens.

Fish-eyes have rear-fitting filters called gelatin filters.
Not sure my Minolta 16mm Fish Eye got rear fitting filter or not, don't aware of it :sweat:
 

Snoweagle

Senior Member
Jan 26, 2005
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#8
zcf said:
Good to know that nowaday film are not so sensitive to UV. Thanks for the explanation.
I sometime don't use filter also, especially under low light condition, or I think sharpness is essential.


Not sure my Minolta 16mm Fish Eye got rear fitting filter or not, don't aware of it :sweat:
Canon's fish-eye lens do though...not sure abt minolta's. :dunno:
 

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