Newbie 1st step?


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3in1c

New Member
Oct 23, 2008
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#1
Hello people,

I am just wondering what would most of us do on the very beginning:

a) Buy a DSLR camera with basic lenses, explore and start shooting

b) Sign up a basic course before buying

c) Read books, articles, forum guides then get a camera to try it out

d) Ask friends, or someone who knows better than you

e) Post plenty of questions here

For me, I intend to go for a. What about you?
 

Dec 31, 2002
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#2
A & D more suitable. D as in asking for advices from knowledgable friends.
The rest is read but no hands on, so you might not understand what you had read without having a camera.
 

mindwish

New Member
Aug 20, 2008
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#3
I started off on photography by method C. This forum given me lots of insight, knowledge and advice.
 

aHxi-o

New Member
Aug 31, 2006
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Bedok Reservoir
#4
hihi! i'm new here too!

prolly you might wanna read up on which dslr is best suited for you and balance out the pros and cons of the various big names/models before you make a purchase. as your initial investment will be a good sum of money and fix the path of you gonna develop your photog, you wldnt want to regret the first decision made.

read up, ask around, then experience it for yourself! =)
 

attap seed

Senior Member
Feb 16, 2006
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#5
dun learn the wrong things. get things rite the first time.

correcting them later on will cost u much time and wasted money.
 

Headshotzx

Senior Member
Dec 14, 2007
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#6
Read this: http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/showthread.php?t=309544
If it doesn't make sense to you, then purchase a camera, and read it again when you have it.
Just start shooting, and think about what you want to see in the picture before you shoot. Learn the technicalities, and then learn how to project your creativity and vision into the photo.

And stay away from "trying new lenses" if you can help it ;) Bad for your wallet.
 

#7
First, read as many books as possible. By reading, you'll get an idea of the basics concepts, and what camera will be suitable for you.

Second, buy a camera then practice practice and practice. Buy what you need, not what you want, then practice and familiarize yourself with the camera.

Third, learn more advanced techniques. You can do it by asking those who has more experience, or by referring to a more advanced books.

The next steps are practice, practice and practice. Don't expect you can get a good picture everytime you shoot. Please also note that using better equipment does not mean you can get a better shot, it will only helps you with some basic things, but the the eyes are yours and the brain is yours too...

If you think you'll need to buy additional equipment, don't straight away buy a pro one. Buy a cheap and adequate one first and practice practice and practice. Then decide, if you really want to be more serious, buy the real one equipment. If by any chance you don't like it, you only lost a small amount of money.

My two cents.
 

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3in1c

New Member
Oct 23, 2008
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#8
Lots of useful comments coming in. Thank you! Keep them coming!

By the way, I have been reading about 2-3hours everyday for about a week. While I benefited from this forum, I also visited the library. Honestly, the information and knowledge here is practical, handy, detailed and simplified. My passion grew and I have not touched a DSLR yet. It is really important to understand basics.

Time and money- agreed!
 

Oct 29, 2007
91
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Western Singapore
#10
Hi welcome, when i started out of curiousity happen to pick up a book on photography and has been hooked on since. In the mean time read up more on the basics till your sick of the theory stuff and eager to try out in the field. If possible borrow a camera from a friend or tag along with them when they go shooting and try it out. If your still keen after numerous trips and decide to get a camera for yourself. Before buying always try the camera, does it feel comfortable in your hands, do a few test shots and compare the prices. Remember you are buying a system, should you decide to change brands later any current lens you have will be incompatible with the latter.
 

splim

New Member
May 6, 2006
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#11
Sign up basic course, you'll have instructor(s) to answer all your questions :) There are practical sessions so it's best to have a DSLR before signing up.
 

giantcanopy

Senior Member
Feb 11, 2007
6,232
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#12
Self discovery ( experiment with the camera and discover what works what doesn't, and always trying something new and different ) with right learning attitude ( read , and see more of people's works ).

Impressions made by self discovery makes learning sweeter, more rewarding and lasting.

Learn to be more critical of yourself, never be too satisfied with what you got, because your best shots are the ones you are taking next.

Ryan
 

Aug 22, 2008
565
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#13
Hello people,

I am just wondering what would most of us do on the very beginning:

a) Buy a DSLR camera with basic lenses, explore and start shooting

b) Sign up a basic course before buying

c) Read books, articles, forum guides then get a camera to try it out

d) Ask friends, or someone who knows better than you

e) Post plenty of questions here

For me, I intend to go for a. What about you?
I recommend option (c) first then go for (a) but buy used equipment for the start.

Borders and Kinokuniya are good places to start off with books and magazines.
 

Thanatos

New Member
Oct 14, 2008
27
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Singapore
#14
a and d

Well I started off with a prosumer camera and I've reached the limits of what I can do with it. So I moved on to the next step and got myself a DSLR. But b4 I did that I spoke to a few of my colleagues who are into photography and got advice from them on the cost of such a switch. Once I got my camera I simply bugged them into teaching me how to use the camera and how to get the shots that I wanted, I even bugged one of them to lend me a lens so that I can decide if I should get it.
 

gymak90

New Member
Jan 5, 2008
1,448
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#15
I would say C or D or both.

Why not A/B?
Because there's no point dumping money and realise photography isn't your cup of tea.

Why not E?
I'm not saying you should not ask a single question here. But chances are, without shooting first, you won't know the troubles and problems you would be face. Without problems, you won't have questions to ask right?

So after asking, reading, researching, get a camera, like what you said in C. If you want to save, get a 2nd hand dslr. Very affordable. It's also ok if you want 1st hand. Question is cost.
 

night86mare

Deregistered
Aug 25, 2006
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#16
(c)

if you do (e) if you've hung around enough you know what sort of reply you'll get from moi :D

anyways, (d) is probably a bad choice, or at least find the correct people. if you meet a gearhead, chances are, you'll turn into a gearhead.
 

giantcanopy

Senior Member
Feb 11, 2007
6,232
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#17
(d) is probably a bad choice, or at least find the correct people. if you meet a gearhead, chances are, you'll turn into a gearhead.
:bsmilie:

After one or two gatherings you will know who are the ones who are more proud of telling you their gears than those that shows you their shots.

I myself am not for signing up courses. Cause the basics can be learnt easily and more effective by yourself.

Ryan
 

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3in1c

New Member
Oct 23, 2008
609
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#18
Although I have read quite a bit here and in the library. I still think I dont know much so I have decided to sign up basic course to ensure I acquire proper knowledge. Meanwhile will continue to read more. Honestly, without a camera its difficult to visualize.

I am giving myself till next week for final reading and move on to get a camera.
 

Oct 29, 2007
91
0
0
Western Singapore
#19
i would suggest holding on before you go for the course as most require that you have the camera, if your eager to try out, a better alternative would be to rent cameras from rental studio or others for a day. Rates are affordable too starting from $20 and above.
 

3in1c

New Member
Oct 23, 2008
609
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#20
i would suggest holding on before you go for the course as most require that you have the camera, if your eager to try out, a better alternative would be to rent cameras from rental studio or others for a day. Rates are affordable too starting from $20 and above.
Appreciate your suggestions, thank you! My in law has a friend into photography, in fact he took our wedding pictures. I am giving him a ring soon. Buy him coffee with the $20!
 

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