Newbie 101


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#1
Hi to all the members of ClubSNAP, professional photographers and photographer enthusiasts,

I'm new to photography, new to this forum, but after reading some posts here, and viewing some critique posts, i've decided to make my first post here. Let me just start off with my personal background. I've NOT got myself a DSLR yet, say to say, and this is why i'm going to post some of my doubts, which i hope serves as the newbie 101 for more users like me.

I'm trying to better understand what should be some of the things to note for a pure true blue newbie to photography and DSLRs. I know maybe what i'm going ask here may have already been in conflicts with some of the previous old threads, so i'm gonna apologize here in advance to the Administrator or the Moderator, and hope i do still get some kind souls to help me out as a newbie.

Firstly, let me start with my intention, what i know and where can i get more information from.

1. I'm considering to get a Canon EOS 450D.
- So, first stupid noob question you guys might think, and that's when i get a DSLR, it's just a basic set without any lenses right? Which means if i purchase just EOS 450D, it doesn't have a lenses and that's where the bundled EOS 450D Kit (EF-S 18-55) and EOS 450D Kit II (EF-S18-200) is given as quoted from Canon site? And in this case, it's definitely a no-go for a starter to just get the EOS 450D without minimum a kit lenses?

- Secondly, is it advisable for starter to go for this EOS 450D? I guess you guys might being asking me, how is my usage and for what general purpose. Well, i intend to bring it along with me, with scenery snapping, humans, food and etc, more like a random photographer, and i do yearn to achieve good photo shoots. I'm currently using a point-of-shoot, mostly natural light mode, and i don't really like the noisy photos. So what should be the recommended cheapest set, including lenses and accessories for user like me.


2. Say, after i got my camera, where can i go to, examples of some websites or forum threads, whereby i can get access to information about all the various modes, and all the technical terms of photography, like Aperture, Exposure, Focal length, etc. How to go about setting manual mode for the various A-Z photo shooting.


3. If budget is a constraint for me, what should be the bare minimal stuff i should have to start my DSLR journey? And under what circumstances should one, never ever consider getting a DSLR, for eg. those only intend to get the basics, like the cam and a lenses or those who are not going to do the post-shoot processing, or those who only does default modes shooting and lazy to find out what they can do with a DSLR?


Lastly, i hope to get more cold hard facts about photography, DSLRs, etc which will give newbies or wannabes better informed decisions if we do want to go into the frame-box journey.

Many thanks! :)
 

luntut

Senior Member
Oct 19, 2007
1,884
0
36
Punggol
#2
1. I'm considering to get a Canon EOS 450D.
- So, first stupid noob question you guys might think, and that's when i get a DSLR, it's just a basic set without any lenses right? Which means if i purchase just EOS 450D, it doesn't have a lenses and that's where the bundled EOS 450D Kit (EF-S 18-55) and EOS 450D Kit II (EF-S18-200) is given as quoted from Canon site? And in this case, it's definitely a no-go for a starter to just get the EOS 450D without minimum a kit lenses?
No get lens, how to shoot?? Just get the set with the 18-55 kit lens.

- Secondly, is it advisable for starter to go for this EOS 450D? I guess you guys might being asking me, how is my usage and for what general purpose. Well, i intend to bring it along with me, with scenery snapping, humans, food and etc, more like a random photographer, and i do yearn to achieve good photo shoots. I'm currently using a point-of-shoot, mostly natural light mode, and i don't really like the noisy photos. So what should be the recommended cheapest set, including lenses and accessories for user like me.
Its even ok for a starter to start with a 5D2 or 1D3. its just a matter of how steep a learning curve is for you. IMO, 450D is a good camera to start for you. Curve not so steep.

2. Say, after i got my camera, where can i go to, examples of some websites or forum threads, whereby i can get access to information about all the various modes, and all the technical terms of photography, like Aperture, Exposure, Focal length, etc. How to go about setting manual mode for the various A-Z photo shooting.
GOOGLE IS YOUR BEST FRIEND.
Everything can be found online. just need to do a quick google online or in this forum, and read the stickies. PLEASE READ the stickies in the Newbies Subforum, and digest. And then with what you have digested, GO OUT AND SHOOT. all reading and no action makes a dull hobby.

3. If budget is a constraint for me, what should be the bare minimal stuff i should have to start my DSLR journey? And under what circumstances should one, never ever consider getting a DSLR, for eg. those only intend to get the basics, like the cam and a lenses or those who are not going to do the post-shoot processing, or those who only does default modes shooting and lazy to find out what they can do with a DSLR?
1000D then. Should be the cheapest of them lot?
Using 10000 dollar lens is not going to allow you to get picture perfect shots that you dont hve to post process. Skils and experiences does. Money is NOT EVERYTHING in this hobby. It helps, but cannot solve all problems. I have seen people shoot weddings with a nikon 18-70 kit lens and still have better incamera pictures then someone using D700 w/ 24-70.

Lastly, i hope to get more cold hard facts about photography, DSLRs, etc which will give newbies or wannabes better informed decisions if we do want to go into the frame-box journey.
GOOGLE IS STILL YOUR BEST FRIEND.
NEWBIE THREAD STICKIES TOO.
 

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Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
19,105
12
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#3
3. If budget is a constraint for me, what should be the bare minimal stuff i should have to start my DSLR journey? And under what circumstances should one, never ever consider getting a DSLR, for eg. those only intend to get the basics, like the cam and a lenses or those who are not going to do the post-shoot processing, or those who only does default modes shooting and lazy to find out what they can do with a DSLR?
If you're on a budget, a Sony or Nikon may be more affordable.

If you want to learn more, there's tons of websites, there's the ClubSnap newbies guide, there's the dozens of books in the libraries, and if you get a Sony there's a free newbies course.


Lastly, i hope to get more cold hard facts about photography, DSLRs, etc which will give newbies or wannabes better informed decisions if we do want to go into the frame-box journey.

Many thanks! :)
Seek and ye shall find. Reading the camera manual is a good start.
 

Webitect

New Member
May 11, 2008
89
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Cyberspace
www.newbiephoto.net
#4
Hi,

I'm a newbie myself, started about a year ago. So I think I can understand where you're coming from. All the info you need is readily available. As suggested before, start with the manual, it should tell you everything you need to know on operating your camera in all the modes. For me, it was all kinda read and understand but to really understand you gotta go take pictures. Once you figure out what you don't want in your photos then you can surf the web to find the solution.

Getting a DSLR is a lot more expensive than a point and shoot and will guarantee that you will be spending more money than just for the camera. As you shoot more, get better, develop a favorite style/subject matter then you'll realize what your current equipment can and can't do which will spur the "need" to "upgrade". If not that, then most likely you will get a tripod, a "head" that can support the weight of your camera, flash, filters either for protection of the lens or for artistic qualities, cleaning stuff, storage equipment (to prevent fungus), bags to carry your stuff etc etc. If you're not prepared for this then I think there are point and shoots around the same price point as the cheapest dslr that can give you comparable shots, a lot lighter and fit in your pocket.

If you're seriously into photography and would be able to budget for future purchases then DSLR's, in my opinion, is the way to go because there isn't a single "do it all" camera. With DSLR's you can find the right lenses/equipment to do what you want and do it better than any point and shoot.

Hope that helps....
 

night86mare

Deregistered
Aug 25, 2006
25,541
0
0
www.pbase.com
#5
1. I'm considering to get a Canon EOS 450D.
- So, first stupid noob question you guys might think, and that's when i get a DSLR, it's just a basic set without any lenses right? Which means if i purchase just EOS 450D, it doesn't have a lenses and that's where the bundled EOS 450D Kit (EF-S 18-55) and EOS 450D Kit II (EF-S18-200) is given as quoted from Canon site? And in this case, it's definitely a no-go for a starter to just get the EOS 450D without minimum a kit lenses?
18-55 is fine, it is good for most normal daily photographs, the 18-200 will definitely cost more.... but you might be able to keep it for travel photography, as an all in one solution. but not everyone likes 18-200. so it really depends on your budget.

you definitely need a lens, body-only means you sit there and play with the shutter but take no pictures.

450 is alright for a beginner, can produce very good photos. but this is with the premise that you put in the effort to learn photography properly, instead of just snapping away and complaining why your photos are not as good as others.

2. Say, after i got my camera, where can i go to, examples of some websites or forum threads, whereby i can get access to information about all the various modes, and all the technical terms of photography, like Aperture, Exposure, Focal length, etc. How to go about setting manual mode for the various A-Z photo shooting.
look in newbies corner here --> sulhan's photography notes for newbies, this will give you a brief introduction of all that.

then pick up books on basic photography at your friendly national library, there are many titles each catering to every style of learning possible.

3. If budget is a constraint for me, what should be the bare minimal stuff i should have to start my DSLR journey? And under what circumstances should one, never ever consider getting a DSLR, for eg. those only intend to get the basics, like the cam and a lenses or those who are not going to do the post-shoot processing, or those who only does default modes shooting and lazy to find out what they can do with a DSLR?
bare minimum; accessories like compactflash card, dry cabinet.

something more, that you might need but entirely optional:
1) tripod
2) external flash
3) more lenses later on

by the way, you consider learning how to post process.... because it allows you that much more creative expression. :)
 

lennyl

New Member
Mar 27, 2008
1,520
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Northern California
#6
2. Say, after i got my camera, where can i go to, examples of some websites or forum threads, whereby i can get access to information about all the various modes, and all the technical terms of photography, like Aperture, Exposure, Focal length, etc. How to go about setting manual mode for the various A-Z photo shooting.
Don't forget books. They're a pretty good source of information too, the fundamentals behind photography has not changed that much. Just ignore the parts about film. Bryan Peterson and Scott Kelby has some good beginner books. Peterson's Understanding Exposure gives a very good introduction to the background (and then some) and Kelby has a couple of books (third one due soon, I believe) on techniques for different situations.
 

Fullerene

New Member
May 18, 2009
8
0
0
Bedok Reservoir
#7
Hallo everyone,

My situtation quite similar to IronicCorrupt in that I
i) have not get myself a DSLR yet (although i decided to get soon), my preference are scenary shoots, sunrise, sunset, and candid shoots
ii) pure true blue newbie to photography, having only used PnS camera in the past.
iii) I know next to nothing about using post processing in image editing s/w

I have some queries for the experts here:
I'm going to climb Mt. Kinabalu soon, will it be advisable for a newbie like me to bring along a DLSR to take the sunrise photo as well as scernary but since i doubt i will be able to bring along a tripod with me, and most likely I will be be shivering, and with my newbie skill, I might not be able to do justice to the camera.
What are some of the precaution I should take, or thing I should take note of if i bring the camera along?

Best Regards
 

lennyl

New Member
Mar 27, 2008
1,520
0
0
Northern California
#8
I'm going to climb Mt. Kinabalu soon, will it be advisable for a newbie like me to bring along a DLSR to take the sunrise photo as well as scernary but since i doubt i will be able to bring along a tripod with me, and most likely I will be be shivering, and with my newbie skill, I might not be able to do justice to the camera.
If you don't know how to use it effectively, I would recommend just bringing a P&S up there. For one thing, it is much lighter.
 

luntut

Senior Member
Oct 19, 2007
1,884
0
36
Punggol
#9
If you don't know how to use it effectively, I would recommend just bringing a P&S up there. For one thing, it is much lighter.
i second, third and fourth this advice!
 

Fullerene

New Member
May 18, 2009
8
0
0
Bedok Reservoir
#10
Dear Leenyl and Luntut,

Thanks!
Better not to risk "dragging" myself up and end up with CMI photos.
I better sign up for some courses soon. :D

Best Regards,
Boon Hui
 

lennyl

New Member
Mar 27, 2008
1,520
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0
Northern California
#11
Better not to risk "dragging" myself up and end up with CMI photos.
I better sign up for some courses soon.
Practice is good, but just thought that there are easier ways to practice. Another thing to bear in mind is that you probably want to enjoy the moment when you make it up there, instead of spending time experimenting with the camera. Not saying you can't or shouldn't, just what I would do in your shoes. Enjoy the climb!
 

SeAnCoLd

Senior Member
Nov 10, 2008
595
0
16
#12
I don't agree with this. I brought my 40D with all my lenses up mt. kinabalu just two months after getting into photography. One of the lenses was never used before and the other only once. Basically, I thought it's silly spending so much money on photographic equipment to capture the moment, but yet not bring them out to locations where you're likely to have the moments. So in the end, I lugged them along, with the mindset that if I damage them, i'll just sent them for repairs or buy a replacement.

It was rough climbing the mountain with all that equipment, but the pictures that came out were pretty satisfying. I would say it was a really good experience that allowed me to practice out there in (challenging) field conditions. What I did to ensure that I learn was to take several frames of the same shot to minimise risk of blur and check on the lcd to ensure good composition, exposure and colour. I came home with my equipment, still pristine, and thousands of pictures. Of course, only slightly more than a hundred survived, since many shots were redundant. But hey, my climbing buddies were all happy with those hundred shots. So, personally, I would recommend that you get your camera out there and learn along the way!

ps. some tips for the climb would be to bring big zip locs to wrap your equipment with if it rains. Don't bring sling bags or shoulder bags. A waist bag or backpack would obstruct movements less. I brought the lowepro offtrail2. Lastly, make sure your shoes has a good grip! I wore my army boots. :sweatsm:



Dear Leenyl and Luntut,

Thanks!
Better not to risk "dragging" myself up and end up with CMI photos.
I better sign up for some courses soon. :D

Best Regards,
Boon Hui
 

SeAnCoLd

Senior Member
Nov 10, 2008
595
0
16
#13
One more thing to add. I did read a lot even before I bought my camera, so I was actually testing out the stuff that I had read. I urge you to read extensively on photography (especially landscape) before your trip. :)
 

luntut

Senior Member
Oct 19, 2007
1,884
0
36
Punggol
#14
I don't agree with this. I brought my 40D with all my lenses up mt. kinabalu just two months after getting into photography. One of the lenses was never used before and the other only once. Basically, I thought it's silly spending so much money on photographic equipment to capture the moment, but yet not bring them out to locations where you're likely to have the moments. So in the end, I lugged them along, with the mindset that if I damage them, i'll just sent them for repairs or buy a replacement.

It was rough climbing the mountain with all that equipment, but the pictures that came out were pretty satisfying. I would say it was a really good experience that allowed me to practice out there in (challenging) field conditions. What I did to ensure that I learn was to take several frames of the same shot to minimise risk of blur and check on the lcd to ensure good composition, exposure and colour. I came home with my equipment, still pristine, and thousands of pictures. Of course, only slightly more than a hundred survived, since many shots were redundant. But hey, my climbing buddies were all happy with those hundred shots. So, personally, I would recommend that you get your camera out there and learn along the way!

ps. some tips for the climb would be to bring big zip locs to wrap your equipment with if it rains. Don't bring sling bags or shoulder bags. A waist bag or backpack would obstruct movements less. I brought the lowepro offtrail2. Lastly, make sure your shoes has a good grip! I wore my army boots. :sweatsm:
One more thing to add. I did read a lot even before I bought my camera, so I was actually testing out the stuff that I had read. I urge you to read extensively on photography (especially landscape) before your trip. :)

the whole point is, if you are going to get the DSLR 1 week before the climb, and got ZERO opportunity to shoot with it from the time you buy it till the climb, then better not use or bring it. Especially if you are a person who believes in using M mode for DSLRs...

its not about bringing that thing up, i can buy a D3x and all the trinity lens at the airport before i fly, but it DOESNT mean I will know how to use it. they will juz end up dead weight.

and for some, reading is not enough. they need hands on. not everyone is built wonderfully like you.

no offense.
 

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Fullerene

New Member
May 18, 2009
8
0
0
Bedok Reservoir
#15
Dear All,

Thanks for all the different pov I really appreciated them. :)
Although I did read up a little before I decided and bought the camera, but I know its won't be enough without some hand-on, especially I'm a more hand-on person, reading theory however do help somewhat in understanding why certain things work/dun work the way you expected it to be.

Although I can get a little hand-on before the trip, but IMHO, it will only be sufficient for me to know where are some of the common function, etc, but one thing for sure, I'll definitely need to brush up on my composition.

I believe different opinion in a forum are the norm, but the weather recently is hot enough so let all of us stay cool ! :p

Best Wishes

ps. some tips for the climb would be to bring big zip locs to wrap your equipment with if it rains. Don't bring sling bags or shoulder bags. A waist bag or backpack would obstruct movements less. I brought the lowepro offtrail2. Lastly, make sure your shoes has a good grip! I wore my army boots.
Yup! I did check with staffs at John 3:16 what are some of the stuffs i need to take note if I'll be bringing this camera up, and they suggested that I bring ziplock bag along. Thanks for the suggestion against shoulder bag. I wished I could wore my army boots too, but then mine is the old type, and the sole had taper off to the edge and almost flat.

Can I also check with you where do we store our belonging? Its a hostel style right, therefore we get a locker each?

Thanks
 

SeAnCoLd

Senior Member
Nov 10, 2008
595
0
16
#16
Laban Rata used to be really hostel like. Now you'll be surprised by how hotel like it has become. However, still no lockers and rooms are crammed with 6 beds each. You have to bring your valuables wherever you go, or ask your buddies to look after them.


Dear All,


Yup! I did check with staffs at John 3:16 what are some of the stuffs i need to take note if I'll be bringing this camera up, and they suggested that I bring ziplock bag along. Thanks for the suggestion against shoulder bag. I wished I could wore my army boots too, but then mine is the old type, and the sole had taper off to the edge and almost flat.

Can I also check with you where do we store our belonging? Its a hostel style right, therefore we get a locker each?

Thanks
 

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