New to CCD-RAW


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xcess

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Nov 25, 2007
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Hi all i'am just understanding this CCD-RAW thing... When i shoot in like normal JPG it's 2848 X 2136 but when i change the mode to CCD-RAW and after processing the pic, it's 4048 X 3036. The dimension got bigger? So if i where to zoom in the bigger dimension pic it would be clearer? Oh ya shoot in normal JPG i can take abt 200+ pic but if i switch to CCD-RAW only about 30+... Is that normal? Thanks...
 

J-Chan

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Sep 21, 2005
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think you didn't select the highest res JPEG, theres a few settings like S M L right? think of RAW as a digital negative, it stores all the information the cam sensor reads out, without processing.. thats why you get a very large file, meaning less pics per memory space..
 

xcess

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Hmmm... I see... Btw I was using my firend's Fujifilm S6500fd... The max is 2848 x 2136?
 

J-Chan

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Sep 21, 2005
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Hmmm... I see... Btw I was using my firend's Fujifilm S6500fd... The max is 2848 x 2136?
then the software did some interpolaration..
 

xcess

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That means? lol sorry i not very good with the terms...
 

Jan 23, 2005
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#6
Hmmm... I see... Btw I was using my firend's Fujifilm S6500fd... The max is 2848 x 2136?
Some of Fuji's sensors arrange the photodiodes on a grid that is rotated by 45 degrees. Some raw processing software will embed the sensor data on a larger pixel "canvas" so that it can be processed by the same algorithms as conventionally arranged pixel data. After processing, the image data is rotated back by 45 degrees.

The large pixel count you encounter may be an artifact of this. Take note that it is impossible to convert from a 45 degree diagonal pixel grid to a conventional horizontally/vertically aligned grid in a pixel-by-pixel fashion (i.e. some interpolation is necessary). Without a 1-to-1 pixel mapping, there is no hard rule what the "correct" pixel size of the processed image should be.
 

xcess

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#7
Eh so after i process and it is 4048 X 3036 the pic is more clear and sharp?
 

Jan 23, 2005
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#8
Eh so after i process and it is 4048 X 3036 the pic is more clear and sharp?
I'm not familiar with the sensor specifications of your camera or the software you use. It is likely that there is some additional information in the big image, but not to the extent that you have 4048x3036 "real" pixels.

From the numbers I would *guess* that the sensor has about 8.7 million pixels on a diagonal grid, which get decimated by the in-camera processing to about 6 million pixels (reducing spatial resolution by a factor of sqrt(2)), but interpolated to 12 million pixels by your raw processing software (padding the resolution by a factor of sqrt(2)).

Edit: with "resolution", I refer to the total (area) resolution in pixels, not the linear resolution.
 

xziredmp

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Oct 21, 2006
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#10
what is CCD-RAW ? hmmmmmm...

so is there a CMOS RAW, Fovean RAW, LBCAST RAW, Leaf RAW ?

really...

RAW is RAW.... theres no such thing as CCD RAW.

RAW is known to be something like a digi negative. stores every possible information about the scene into the format.

and raw format takes up more "space" in your memory cards. so..... if your memory card aint big... do consider. ;)
 

theRBK

Senior Member
May 16, 2005
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#11
what is CCD-RAW ? hmmmmmm...
its a term used by Fujifilm... go easy on the TS... :)

like LittleWolf mentioned, the increase in file size is due to the camera's sensor layout and the processing program used... Fujifilm claims that their SuperCCD's (again, Fujifilm's term, not because the CCD has superduper powers :)) honey-comb-like layout of the sensor allows higher resolution as the individual light sensitive elements are packed tighter than those where the layout is in the conventional grid pattern... and their software converts this into images with higher megapixel count than the actual number of light sensitive elements... 2x actually the amount... of course, the increase involves some guess work by the processing program so its not exactly like having 2x the megapixels :)
 

xcess

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Nov 25, 2007
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#12
Alright I kind of understand it now... Thanks all for your help and information on this... :)
 

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