need explanation on metering and white balance


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furrypaws

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Feb 20, 2004
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#1
hi all,
i need some advice and explanation on the metering and whitebalance concept.

would someone kindly advise pls??
i've got the following modes on my camera: esp, spot, multi-metering
how to use each aptly?

also, my models are my cats and they live with me in the room and most times, shots are taken at night when i'm back from work, and sun gone down. only light is the normal fluorescent room light. it was such a chore to figure how to take shots in such lighting without blurring and without flash. the only acceptable setting i managed to figure was a higher ISO, at 400 and, using shutter priority at 1/15. IF they are sleeping and STILL, that is. any other ways i can improve on this??

thanks.. :)
 

Bluestrike

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Staff member
Jan 17, 2002
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There lor~
bluestrike.clubsnap.org
#2
take a look here

http://www.clubsnap.org/display.php?file=articles/photography101/photography101.html

it will give you an inside to metering and some other things too.

As for Whiteblance, it how the camera see the colour "white" under different light condition. For example, under street light, white may appear yellowish. But the camera doesn't know so we have a set of WB setting for you to choose from. the more advance camera have custom WB.
 

justarius

Senior Member
Nov 9, 2003
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#3
furrypaws said:
hi all,
i need some advice and explanation on the metering and whitebalance concept.

would someone kindly advise pls??
i've got the following modes on my camera: esp, spot, multi-metering
how to use each aptly?

also, my models are my cats and they live with me in the room and most times, shots are taken at night when i'm back from work, and sun gone down. only light is the normal fluorescent room light. it was such a chore to figure how to take shots in such lighting without blurring and without flash. the only acceptable setting i managed to figure was a higher ISO, at 400 and, using shutter priority at 1/15. IF they are sleeping and STILL, that is. any other ways i can improve on this??

thanks.. :)
to get sharp shots in those type of conditions (bad lighting), you need to jack up iso, use the widest aperture you possibly can, possibly consider using rear-sync flash, and use a tripod. You can get a serviceable picture but if lighting conditions are bad, the pictures would still not be the best possible. The best solution however, is simply take the pictures when there's better lights, eg during the day when you are home on the weekends. :D
 

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