Need advice : interiors shooting


Spark Sue

New Member
Apr 6, 2016
16
0
0
#1
Hi everyone!
This is my first post n appreciate all help from my questions.

I did read up some of the sticky forum n search through the forums w 'interiors' but not much is found.

However i need some advice so i can start zooming those important details for my camera.

My main usage for the camera will be on interior shoots. What are the things that i need to look out for? Understand there's wide lens that i need to get to maximum the photos. But what kinds of wide lens?

I am a entry-level photographer. (My 1st time doing this - normally just took photos of my families with my old samsung S5 phone)

However i intend to use the camera for a long time - maybe 5yrs? Is there any camera that good for entry - mid level photographer?

I am abit tight on cash, however i am not sure whether should I get a 2nd hand camera as there might be some hidden info that i missed out when dealing with seller.

There's quite a lot of questions to ask but would appreciate someone can lead me some direction for me to look for the information.
 

catchlights

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 27, 2004
21,903
46
48
Punggol, Singapore
www.foto-u.com
#2
you ask a lot of questions, but not much details given, try to be more specific;

what is the intended use/purpose of the photos? for personal interests or for profit making?
how specialise you intend to go into it? as long got picture come out can liao or I want all lines are straighten, no blown highlight and block up shadow areas, and sharp as razor on all four corners?
how often you intend to do this, once a week? once a month? or once half a year?
budget! budget! budget! how much you intend to spend initially? and six months later? and one year later?



anyway, if you just want a quick answer,
get a entry level crop sensor (aka DX) DSLR with ultra wide zoom lens (around 10-24mm or 11-16mm lens) and a sturdy tripod.

FYI, any cameras can last more than 5 years, so long you don't go chase after the latest technology. so not the latest model camera is perfectly fine.
 

ziggy

Senior Member
May 24, 2006
829
4
18
East
#3
For interiors, you will need at least a 28mm lens, 24mm better. 20mm may be too wide and too much distortion. For a start, perhaps an APSC camera from Sony, Canon, or Nikon?

Hard to give more advice until you give us more details like your budget,and other as catchlights had mentioned. You probably need to set aside some budget for photo editing software like Photoshop or Lightroom.
 

donut88

Senior Member
Nov 14, 2008
2,182
5
0
#4
Hi everyone!
This is my first post n appreciate all help from my questions.

I did read up some of the sticky forum n search through the forums w 'interiors' but not much is found.

However i need some advice so i can start zooming those important details for my camera.

My main usage for the camera will be on interior shoots. What are the things that i need to look out for? Understand there's wide lens that i need to get to maximum the photos. But what kinds of wide lens?

I am a entry-level photographer. (My 1st time doing this - normally just took photos of my families with my old samsung S5 phone)

However i intend to use the camera for a long time - maybe 5yrs? Is there any camera that good for entry - mid level photographer?

I am abit tight on cash, however i am not sure whether should I get a 2nd hand camera as there might be some hidden info that i missed out when dealing with seller.

There's quite a lot of questions to ask but would appreciate someone can lead me some direction for me to look for the information.
Whatever u r getting, never get those overpriced wide angle filter that a black shop will try to con u.......

U can get, but make sure u don't overpay
 

Spark Sue

New Member
Apr 6, 2016
16
0
0
#5
Wow, thks for the advices n questions that i need to ask myself 1st.

Here's the following answer :

1. Consider both?As myself is a interior designer n which is why i thought i should learn interior shooting for my personal profolio n other opportunities.

2. If possible i intend to learn interior shootings as much as possible within the camera i bought for myself. Maximise the camera performance. Like what you mentioned, those angles shots, etc.

3. Photos taking should be once a month since it's finished work then take. Dont think i gg to take solid photos during site progressing.

4. $500? For the lens wise, i intend to rent first before deciding getting a right lens for interior shooting. As you guys mentioned, 28mm / 24mm or even 20mm which i need to tried before gettng it.

5. I was looking through forums n mentioned that D3000 nikon is quite solid? I saw 2nd hand its quite good price - around 250. But it's a very old camera?

6. Understand that you mentioned that the camera r able to last very long - however can i check whethet mentioned lens mm (20/24/28) r they all available in all camera brands / model as well?

Hope this information should give me more direction to lead to. N thks again for all the helps here. Really need it for me to work my camera.
 

one eye jack

Senior Member
Jun 11, 2011
816
12
18
#6
Wow, thks for the advices n questions that i need to ask myself 1st.

Here's the following answer :

1. Consider both?As myself is a interior designer n which is why i thought i should learn interior shooting for my personal profolio n other opportunities.

2. If possible i intend to learn interior shootings as much as possible within the camera i bought for myself. Maximise the camera performance. Like what you mentioned, those angles shots, etc.


Hope this information should give me more direction to lead to. N thks again for all the helps here. Really need it for me to work my camera.
If you can't find in this forum then internet is the best alternative. Using a few keywords like
interior photography will net you many websites.Like how to's..like this,
another this,
and this.

What lens to use? A suggestion is here but not necessary that you must use.

I would not dare to suggest any camera because it is personal.You mention D3000 and there is a newer
version D3300.It's entry level of course but since you want to shoot for your portfolio with a DX/APSC image sensor would be best for quality as it is essential to present/impress ( the best quality ) to your potential clients. Ultimately even out of the camera shots will need some touch-ups or enhancements / post processing software like Adobe Lightroom or photoshop but these will take some effort to learn to use effectively in addition to your photography skills. Would it be better to colaborate with a photographer friend initially ( help with post processing )until you can do it all by yourself? :)
 

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Spark Sue

New Member
Apr 6, 2016
16
0
0
#7
Thanks for the tips. :) May I know which are the one that come with DX/APSC image sensor and within my budget? How i wish I have close friends that are into photography,,,sadly no..:(
Any more advices will be good. :)
 

SkyStrike

Moderator
Staff member
Nov 29, 2010
3,444
11
38
Somewhere
#8
Thanks for the tips. :) May I know which are the one that come with DX/APSC image sensor and within my budget? How i wish I have close friends that are into photography,,,sadly no..:(
Any more advices will be good. :)
To identify if it's a DX sensor, for Nikon, look for those 4 digits series. E.g. D3000, D3300, D7000 etc. The other way is to look at the specs.

Photos for your personal portfolio, you might want to get a professional interior photographer to help you with that (instant results, but at a price).... As there are really alot to learn, from lighting to perspective. And this will take alot of time to trial and error.

If you wish to pick up shooting interior slowly, apart from the gears, you will want to spend more time reading and trying out the interior lighting techniques which (in my opinion) are more critical to getting the kind of shots that will impress your prospects. The only way to improve on these is constant trial and errors.

As to camera.... Personally, I feel that any "old" camera that you see out there can do the job you said. For a paper print, not alot of megapixels are required. And if you are shooting interior, you will likely be using a very low ISO where the cameras perform quite similarly.

For the mentioned lenses 20/24/28mm, are you referring to prime lens (lens that cannot zoom ones)? If you want to keep your budget v.low, stick with kit lens zoom, kit lens usually have more distortions than prime lens, but with some post processing, the distortions can be 'more or less' corrected. To my untrained eyes, I usually look at other things in the photos before I see distortions, YMMV.


***I would also like to point out that, when you are reading articles online, especially those recommending focal length to use or what lens to use for <insert genre> shoot, you will need to know the real focal length if you used it on a APSC body.

E.g.
Above mentioned 24mm or 28mm lens, on a crop body, it's translated into 36mm, and 42mm respectively. All these are due to the crop factor. For Nikon and Sony APSC, it's 1.5x, for Canon, it's 1.6x. If you rush out to get the 24mm lens and use it on your APSC body, it will be 36mm (and this might be abit tight).


For sites that recommend the focal length used, e.g. 28mm, you will need to work backwards to know what is the focal length on APSC. In this case it's 28/(crop factor, assuming 1.5) = ~18mm. Which means 18mm on APSC will get you your 28mm shot.
 

catchlights

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 27, 2004
21,903
46
48
Punggol, Singapore
www.foto-u.com
#9
There are couple of things you need to consider,
1) the 20mm / 24mm /28mm lenses are meant for full frame cameras, and personally I find the 14-24mm lens is a better choice for interior photography. But you don't need to consider this as it is way way way way over your budget.
2) for crop sensor camera, you should look for 10-24 lenses or 11-16 mm lenses, that translate to 15-35mm or 16-24 mm, these are the idea focal length for interior photography. FYI, even used lenses as such will cost around $400-$500
3) even thou the used DX/APSC camera body fits in your budget, but the ultra wide angles lenses are still way over your budget. So you can also consider M43 cameras, their lenses are much cheaper than DSLR DX lenses. However I am not familiar with m43 camera system, so can offer you any advices.
4) you need a sturdy tripod, if you want to have some decent interior shots. that cost some money too.
5) you need a decent image editing software, and you need to spend some quality and quantity time to learn how to use it.
6) interior shots are not as simple most people think, it needs photographer to pay great attention to all the fine details, you will need to move around and look for best angle, what is ideal camera height? what are the areas you want to include or eliminate? what are features you want to emphasize? do you need to move the furnitures or display? how to deal with mixed lighting and high contrast lighting? All these you need to spend a great deal of time to learn. you can't just depends on watching youtude video, you need a lots of hands on practises, so only spent time shooting interior once a month is simply not enough.
 

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one eye jack

Senior Member
Jun 11, 2011
816
12
18
#10
Thanks for the tips. :) May I know which are the one that come with DX/APSC image sensor and within my budget? How i wish I have close friends that are into photography,,,sadly no..:(
Any more advices will be good. :)
DX or APSC camera + lens out of your budget..not worth it for once a month shoot..:think:
Alternatively a smaller sensor like....M4/3.
Someone is selling an old Panasonic DMC-G3 + kitlens 14-42mm ( 28-84mm 35mm equivalent) about 5-6yrs. old.Although aperture is not fast but for well lighted interiors it will do .ISO image sensor sensitivity is decent and fast autofocus ( when it was introduced in 2011).16 megapixel micro four thirds ( M4/3) sensor can print out large photos for your portfolio.Camera + kit lens for $250.Can buy to play play. I have older G1 at 12MP.For this price nothing to complain about:bsmilie:
Don't forget you need to buy dry cabinet for storage about $70-80 and maybe a tripod and external flash later? Can use the software that came with the camera for starters.

See seller ad:
http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1603035

G3 camera review:
http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/DMCG3/DMCG3A.HTM
 

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Spark Sue

New Member
Apr 6, 2016
16
0
0
#11
To identify if it's a DX sensor, for Nikon, look for those 4 digits series. E.g. D3000, D3300, D7000 etc. The other way is to look at the specs.

Photos for your personal portfolio, you might want to get a professional interior photographer to help you with that (instant results, but at a price).... As there are really alot to learn, from lighting to perspective. And this will take alot of time to trial and error.

If you wish to pick up shooting interior slowly, apart from the gears, you will want to spend more time reading and trying out the interior lighting techniques which (in my opinion) are more critical to getting the kind of shots that will impress your prospects. The only way to improve on these is constant trial and errors.

As to camera.... Personally, I feel that any "old" camera that you see out there can do the job you said. For a paper print, not alot of megapixels are required. And if you are shooting interior, you will likely be using a very low ISO where the cameras perform quite similarly.

For the mentioned lenses 20/24/28mm, are you referring to prime lens (lens that cannot zoom ones)? If you want to keep your budget v.low, stick with kit lens zoom, kit lens usually have more distortions than prime lens, but with some post processing, the distortions can be 'more or less' corrected. To my untrained eyes, I usually look at other things in the photos before I see distortions, YMMV.


***I would also like to point out that, when you are reading articles online, especially those recommending focal length to use or what lens to use for <insert genre> shoot, you will need to know the real focal length if you used it on a APSC body.

E.g.
Above mentioned 24mm or 28mm lens, on a crop body, it's translated into 36mm, and 42mm respectively. All these are due to the crop factor. For Nikon and Sony APSC, it's 1.5x, for Canon, it's 1.6x. If you rush out to get the 24mm lens and use it on your APSC body, it will be 36mm (and this might be abit tight).


For sites that recommend the focal length used, e.g. 28mm, you will need to work backwards to know what is the focal length on APSC. In this case it's 28/(crop factor, assuming 1.5) = ~18mm. Which means 18mm on APSC will get you your 28mm shot.
There are couple of things you need to consider,
1) the 20mm / 24mm /28mm lenses are meant for full frame cameras, and personally I find the 14-24mm lens is a better choice for interior photography. But you don't need to consider this as it is way way way way over your budget.
2) for crop sensor camera, you should look for 10-24 lenses or 11-16 mm lenses, that translate to 15-35mm or 16-24 mm, these are the idea focal length for interior photography. FYI, even used lenses as such will cost around $400-$500
3) even thou the used DX/APSC camera body fits in your budget, but the ultra wide angles lenses are still way over your budget. So you can also consider M43 cameras, their lenses are much cheaper than DSLR DX lenses. However I am not familiar with m43 camera system, so can offer you any advices.
4) you need a sturdy tripod, if you want to have some decent interior shots. that cost some money too.
5) you need a decent image editing software, and you need to spend some quality and quantity time to learn how to use it.
6) interior shots are not as simple most people think, it needs photographer to pay great attention to all the fine details, you will need to move around and look for best angle, what is ideal camera height? what are the areas you want to include or eliminate? what are features you want to emphasize? do you need to move the furnitures or display? how to deal with mixed lighting and high contrast lighting? All these you need to spend a great deal of time to learn. you can't just depends on watching youtude video, you need a lots of hands on practises, so only spent time shooting interior once a month is simply not enough.
DX or APSC camera + lens out of your budget..not worth it for once a month shoot..:think:
Alternatively a smaller sensor like....M4/3.
Someone is selling an old Panasonic DMC-G3 + kitlens 14-42mm ( 28-84mm 35mm equivalent) about 5-6yrs. old.Although aperture is not fast but for well lighted interiors it will do .ISO image sensor sensitivity is decent and fast autofocus ( when it was introduced in 2011).16 megapixel micro four thirds ( M4/3) sensor can print out large photos for your portfolio.Camera + kit lens for $250.Can buy to play play. I have older G1 at 12MP.For this price nothing to complain about:bsmilie:
Don't forget you need to buy dry cabinet for storage about $70-80 and maybe a tripod and external flash later? Can use the software that came with the camera for starters.
Thanks for all the replies! It help me out alot. Been looking through the tip and further research.

I guess for what I am getting - I don't think I will be getting prime lens at anytime and might go with the standard kit lens that I got for my camera, which is why I am going for DX / APSC Camera (Does dx and APSC the same camera? I saw you guys putting DX/APSC as one) Any Cameras that provide more kit lens? Or all lens are the same?

+ For other lens, I might tried to rent them first before deciding but at this very moment I will be playing with the basic lens with the camera.
+ For the mentioned lenses 20/24/28mm, are you referring to prime lens (lens that cannot zoom ones)? If you want to keep your budget v.low, stick with kit lens zoom, kit lens usually have more distortions than prime lens, but with some post processing, the distortions can be 'more or less' corrected. - I am fine with kit lens zoom as I am familiar with photoshop, perhaps I need to read up for editing on photos for this part.
+ you need a sturdy tripod, if you want to have some decent interior shots. that cost some money too. - Sturdy tripod, is there any things that I should look out for sturdy tripod?
+ Will be getting DX/APSC Camera, not intend to get full-frame - too expensive..lol. Not sure should I get a new one myself or 2nd hand one..any advice on this??
+ ***I would also like to point out that, when you are reading articles online, especially those recommending focal length to use or what lens to use for <insert genre> shoot, you will need to know the real focal length if you used it on a APSC body. Based on my understanding, i need to know how long it will extend when i put those lens in so that it will be too long that it affect my overall photo taking on the interior shots.
+ Need to get dry cabinet for my camera? I thought just the normal bag will do..any dry cabinet to recommend?
+ Is there any store that caters for this kinds of stuffs? Not just those normal mall outlets but really cameras shop that I can check out myself?

Thanks again for all the helps! Can't wait to test it once I manage to read and target the one i want..headache..lol
 

one eye jack

Senior Member
Jun 11, 2011
816
12
18
#12
If you are familiar with Photoshop then you are on SOLID ground.Your photos will look very
professional and artistic if you so choose to make it.:) Since you are good at retouching
and blending,( cloning,patch, healing, vanishing point etc.) with wide angle lens vertical and horizontal lines will be need correction and photoshop does it well.

20/24/28mm are prime lenses referenced to 35mm film format before digital came into
existence. (fixed focal length compared with a zoom like kit lens).Their rational being
better quality like sharpness and big apertures like 2.8 or better.But wide angles have
large depth of field by virtue of it's wider angle of view so having big aperture not
necessary needed when for interiors you would use smaller aperture to get as much of the
"room" in sharp focus.Of course can blur out to emphasise details.

On the use of tripod...need or not depending how pro you want it, shooting handheld is also possible just use a shutter speed same or double the focal length of lens. eg. 28mm use 1/30 or 1/60 or faster if lighting allow or bump up iso sensivity,if you just want to put up photos in your blog cum porfolio after photoshop enhancement of course. Anyway image stabalisation in camera or lens go a long way to produce shakefree photos.

Nikon calls it DX or APSC format sensor for the rest of other brands.Also note the crop factor with reference to 35mm film format of 24mm X 36mm image rectangle.Whether you use 1.5 or 1.6 to calculate the 35mm equivalent is close enough.So APSC 18mm X 1.5 = 27mm focal length equivalent angle of view. Most kit lens are around 18 - 55mm.So for interiors you'd use the shortest end of the range.

If you want peace of mind then buy new if you have the budget. On average APSC camera body with kit lens cost around $700 plus or minus if you have good deal.To prevent fungus growing you may have heard people using bag with silca gel and tupperware box but need to monitor regularly whether silica gel change color or hungry hippos filled with water.Better to spend the money on dry cab power on,set humidity level and forget..peace of mind knowing the $700 investment is in good hands. If camera and lens get fungus...people avoid like the plaque how to sell in future? :) See threads on dry cabs in this forum for brands people use.PS I'm assuming you are targeting DSLR = with mirror/penta prism and view finder.Other than M4/3 mirrorless the other APSC mirrorless may not have viewfinder ( can have attachment at extra cost) the ones that have are expensive or articulated ( can swivel out & twist) LCD screen which can be useful for shooting interiors from low or unusual angles.

People gravitate to Nikon and Canon..true they have wide selection of lenses and 3rd. party brand ones plus 3r. party external TTL flashes. Do check out Pentax's K50 a value for money camera although 3rd. party flash may be a problem. Take your time to research.;)

PS: Camera shops like Ruby Photo at Peninsular shopping center or Cathay photo at nearby Capitol shopping center. They are old and established.:bsmilie: Got somemore other people will list for you which can't recall..
 

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Spark Sue

New Member
Apr 6, 2016
16
0
0
#13
If you are familiar with Photoshop then you are on SOLID ground.Your photos will look very
professional and artistic if you so choose to make it.:) Since you are good at retouching
and blending,( cloning,patch, healing, vanishing point etc.) with wide angle lens vertical and horizontal lines will be need correction and photoshop does it well.

20/24/28mm are prime lenses referenced to 35mm film format before digital came into
existence. (fixed focal length compared with a zoom like kit lens).Their rational being
better quality like sharpness and big apertures like 2.8 or better.But wide angles have
large depth of field by virtue of it's wider angle of view so having big aperture not
necessary needed when for interiors you would use smaller aperture to get as much of the
"room" in sharp focus.Of course can blur out to emphasise details.

On the use of tripod...need or not depending how pro you want it, shooting handheld is also possible just use a shutter speed same or double the focal length of lens. eg. 28mm use 1/30 or 1/60 or faster if lighting allow or bump up iso sensivity,if you just want to put up photos in your blog cum porfolio after photoshop enhancement of course. Anyway image stabalisation in camera or lens go a long way to produce shakefree photos.

Nikon calls it DX or APSC format sensor for the rest of other brands.Also note the crop factor with reference to 35mm film format of 24mm X 36mm image rectangle.Whether you use 1.5 or 1.6 to calculate the 35mm equivalent is close enough.So APSC 18mm X 1.5 = 27mm focal length equivalent angle of view. Most kit lens are around 18 - 55mm.So for interiors you'd use the shortest end of the range.

If you want peace of mind then buy new if you have the budget. On average APSC camera body with kit lens cost around $700 plus or minus if you have good deal.To prevent fungus growing you may have heard people using bag with silca gel and tupperware box but need to monitor regularly whether silica gel change color or hungry hippos filled with water.Better to spend the money on dry cab power on,set humidity level and forget..peace of mind knowing the $700 investment is in good hands. If camera and lens get fungus...people avoid like the plaque how to sell in future? :) See threads on dry cabs in this forum for brands people use.PS I'm assuming you are targeting DSLR = with mirror/penta prism and view finder.Other than M4/3 mirrorless the other APSC mirrorless may not have viewfinder ( can have attachment at extra cost) the ones that have are expensive or articulated ( can swivel out & twist) LCD screen which can be useful for shooting interiors from low or unusual angles.

People gravitate to Nikon and Canon..true they have wide selection of lenses and 3rd. party brand ones plus 3r. party external TTL flashes. Do check out Pentax's K50 a value for money camera although 3rd. party flash may be a problem. Take your time to research.;)

PS: Camera shops like Ruby Photo at Peninsular shopping center or Cathay photo at nearby Capitol shopping center. They are old and established.:bsmilie: Got somemore other people will list for you which can't recall..
Thanks! Glad to know that photoshop play a big part for the photos.

As for the tripod, I think I will be getting one as my hand is quite shaking at time also i think it's good to get one since I main on taking interiors. Perhaps I will get from the original brand that I intend to my camera from.

Also while I was looking through the sales, I notice that shutter count is mentioned in the description - are they important as well? Since I went to the internet and notice that if the shutter count is lot more then I will forget getting it.

Noted on the dry cabinet, will look into it for more information.

PS I'm assuming you are targeting DSLR = with mirror/penta prism and view finder.
- I didn't even know about this, been researching when you mention it. will look into camera with view finder if the price is right for me.

Thanks for the store that I can look at it. Will visit them soon. Thanks! :D

Thanks again for the value information. if there's any more information which I need to look up please let me know so i can research further.
Thanks again guys!
 

Apr 14, 2010
438
2
18
SG
www.flickr.com
#14
My suggestion, in order of purchase priority for starter with limited budget, would be the following. Buy as few items as possible, add on only if budget allows and needs grow. Since your primary job is interior designer & not photographer, spend as little as you can to achieve reasonably good photos for your interior design needs.

1. Entry-level DSLR with a larger range kit-lens (Nikon 5000 series or Canon 700 series; 18mm to 135 or 200mm; 18-55 does not have the advantage of closer photos in the interior that are harder to reach.

2. One, only one, simple front filter (eg: Kenko or Hoya UV or protector) to protect the lens from general dust or accidental scratch of the most front piece of glass. Not circular polariser or special filter.

3. A camera bag, if it doesn't come as a free gift.

4. A 32GB SD card, Class 10, lower transfer rate of 45 or 60 MB/s to save cost.

5. A dry cabinet - not a box - the squarish looking type that's not tall; quite standard. A dry cabinet is essential. Carefully stored DSLR & lens can easily last 6 years or more if kept free of fungus.

6. A tripod between $100-$200 to have some sturdiness yet not heavy and expensive. (To me, not really essential for your case as DSLR kit-lens already has good image stabilisation. Nice to have.)

7. Buy extended warranty to 3 years for the camera body at least; or for both body and kit lens if budget allows. Check with manufacturers when is the last possible date or week to buy so that you can buy later to prioritise the smaller initial budget and not to buy during camera registration time right after purchase.

=====

8. All other purchases on needs basis or when extra $ is available.

(Be very cautious of persuasive salesman in the shop. The best is to decide on what to buy, how much to spend and stick to that when in the shop regardless of what the salesman say. The biggest mistake might be to ask, "What do you think?" He or she will then think, "Maximise my profit." Be very, very careful of what you read in the forum & internet. Maintain a sound balance; spend less; practise & shoot more. Those who advocate buying more or the best are not those who spend their money on what you're buying.)

Regards
 

one eye jack

Senior Member
Jun 11, 2011
816
12
18
#15
Also while I was looking through the sales, I notice that shutter count is mentioned in the description - are they important as well? Since I went to the internet and notice that if the shutter count is lot more then I will forget getting it.
The quoted life span of shutter mechanism by manufacturer is 80K -100,000 actuations give or take.:confused: So if under 10K should be alright.It depends on previous owner usage patterns..haha.
Of course the lesser actuations the better.:thumbsup:
 

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catchlights

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 27, 2004
21,903
46
48
Punggol, Singapore
www.foto-u.com
#16
let me very direct and honest to you, interior photography is a specialise genre, and it foundation builds on your understanding on basic photography, if you have zero knowledge on all the fundamental parts of basic photography, the road to your goal will be very long and winding.

go and build on your foundations first, than you will know what is needed.



and also, few more things I would like point out to you, tripod is very important to shoot interior, and it is a MUST, why?

because you will shoot at an aperture of f11 or even slower, so you able to get maximum depth of field and sharpness, the shutter speed will be so slow, it is impossible to held hand even with image stabilization or VR turn on.
tripod will also help you to be more careful about your composition.

get a ultra wide angle lens if you can, or at the next purchase, normal kit lens is too narrow, most of the time you will find yourself shooting up against the walls.

Polariser filter maybe useful, you will find there are times that you need to remove some reflects from the glass windows or highly reflective surface, however, you can leave it out for the time being, until you find you encounter such issue very often.

a hotshoe flash can be very useful to balance very contrasty lighting, situation like daylight coming from large windows mixing with interior lighting, but if you don't have the basic photography knowledge to back you up, it won't help you at all.
 

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one eye jack

Senior Member
Jun 11, 2011
816
12
18
#17
Well said catchlights, life as they say ..nothing ventured nothing gained.I'm sure TS may seem like
he/she is jumping into the deep end but there's no way anyone can learn if we play it safe..sure many say walk before run given that TS got interior design training ideas like perspective, spatial sense, direction of light and colour matching is second nature.With online tutorials and videos or books I'm sure can get some idea of what is needed to do interiors photography.Having photoshop experience is a bonus if camera/photography or exposure mistakes are made, not that it's going to be easy but the journey is worth it.

PS that's why I said should colaborate with photographer friend for technical assistance.:)
 

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daredevil123

Moderator
Staff member
Oct 25, 2005
21,660
68
48
lil red dot
#18
Catchlights gave good advice. Extremely valuable coming from a long time professional photographer.

TS, if you are tight on your budget, consider also other options. Nikon V1 or V2 is very cheap on the used market now, couple that with the Nikon 1 6.7-13mm Ultra wide lens, you have pretty much a very good kit to start with, without spending too much money. There is no need to worry about ISO performance, because you should be shooting on a tripod at low ISOs anyway.

I am all for TS learning interior photography, especially interior design is his line of expertise. But TS also need to note that there is a learning curve. Getting the right equipment is just a start, and does not immediately guarantee great shots.
 

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Spark Sue

New Member
Apr 6, 2016
16
0
0
#19
Well said catchlights, life as they say ..nothing ventured nothing gained.I'm sure TS may seem like
he/she is jumping into the deep end but there's no way anyone can learn if we play it safe..sure many say walk before run given that TS got interior design training ideas like perspective, spatial sense, direction of light and colour matching is second nature.With online tutorials and videos or books I'm sure can get some idea of what is needed to do interiors photography.Having photoshop experience is a bonus if camera/photography or exposure mistakes are made, not that it's going to be easy but the journey is worth it.

PS that's why I said should colaborate with photographer friend for technical assistance.:)
Catchlights gave good advice. Extremely valuable coming from a long time professional photographer.

TS, if you are tight on your budget, consider also other options. Nikon V1 or V2 is very cheap on the used market now, couple that with the Nikon 1 6.7-13mm Ultra wide lens, you have pretty much a very good kit to start with, without spending too much money. There is no need to worry about ISO performance, because you should be shooting on a tripod at low ISOs anyway.

I am all for TS learning interior photography, especially interior design is his line of expertise. But TS also need to note that there is a learning curve. Getting the right equipment is just a start, and does not immediately guarantee great shots.
let me very direct and honest to you, interior photography is a specialise genre, and it foundation builds on your understanding on basic photography, if you have zero knowledge on all the fundamental parts of basic photography, the road to your goal will be very long and winding.

go and build on your foundations first, than you will know what is needed.



and also, few more things I would like point out to you, tripod is very important to shoot interior, and it is a MUST, why?

because you will shoot at an aperture of f11 or even slower, so you able to get maximum depth of field and sharpness, the shutter speed will be so slow, it is impossible to held hand even with image stabilization or VR turn on.
tripod will also help you to be more careful about your composition.

get a ultra wide angle lens if you can, or at the next purchase, normal kit lens is too narrow, most of the time you will find yourself shooting up against the walls.

Polariser filter maybe useful, you will find there are times that you need to remove some reflects from the glass windows or highly reflective surface, however, you can leave it out for the time being, until you find you encounter such issue very often.

a hotshoe flash can be very useful to balance very contrasty lighting, situation like daylight coming from large windows mixing with interior lighting, but if you don't have the basic photography knowledge to back you up, it won't help you at all.
The quoted life span of shutter mechanism by manufacturer is 80K -100,000 actuations give or take.:confused: So if under 10K should be alright.It depends on previous owner usage patterns..haha.
Of course the lesser actuations the better.:thumbsup:
My suggestion, in order of purchase priority for starter with limited budget, would be the following. Buy as few items as possible, add on only if budget allows and needs grow. Since your primary job is interior designer & not photographer, spend as little as you can to achieve reasonably good photos for your interior design needs.

1. Entry-level DSLR with a larger range kit-lens (Nikon 5000 series or Canon 700 series; 18mm to 135 or 200mm; 18-55 does not have the advantage of closer photos in the interior that are harder to reach.

2. One, only one, simple front filter (eg: Kenko or Hoya UV or protector) to protect the lens from general dust or accidental scratch of the most front piece of glass. Not circular polariser or special filter.

3. A camera bag, if it doesn't come as a free gift.

4. A 32GB SD card, Class 10, lower transfer rate of 45 or 60 MB/s to save cost.

5. A dry cabinet - not a box - the squarish looking type that's not tall; quite standard. A dry cabinet is essential. Carefully stored DSLR & lens can easily last 6 years or more if kept free of fungus.

6. A tripod between $100-$200 to have some sturdiness yet not heavy and expensive. (To me, not really essential for your case as DSLR kit-lens already has good image stabilisation. Nice to have.)

7. Buy extended warranty to 3 years for the camera body at least; or for both body and kit lens if budget allows. Check with manufacturers when is the last possible date or week to buy so that you can buy later to prioritise the smaller initial budget and not to buy during camera registration time right after purchase.

=====

8. All other purchases on needs basis or when extra $ is available.

(Be very cautious of persuasive salesman in the shop. The best is to decide on what to buy, how much to spend and stick to that when in the shop regardless of what the salesman say. The biggest mistake might be to ask, "What do you think?" He or she will then think, "Maximise my profit." Be very, very careful of what you read in the forum & internet. Maintain a sound balance; spend less; practise & shoot more. Those who advocate buying more or the best are not those who spend their money on what you're buying.)

Regards
Wow, thanks again for all the advice here!
Just went out and tried some of the cameras..it's seem alot and the sound of taking the photo..(click click)..amazing..haha
Will definitely start on what's required when getting my camera.

Noted on the tripod and the tips given, will definitely work my foundation even through I have interior design background - Not a easy feat to get the right will keep testing improve my skill along the way. :)

Didn't know that low ISO is required for interior shoots, definitely after looking through the cameras will ask for guidance here.
Thanks again guys! :)
 

SkyStrike

Moderator
Staff member
Nov 29, 2010
3,444
11
38
Somewhere
#20
Didn't know that low ISO is required for interior shoots, definitely after looking through the cameras will ask for guidance here.
Just want to point out that it is not a "must" to use low ISO. It's just that at lower ISO, there will be lesser image noise as compared to when using higher ISO. If your camera can produce images with little or no noise at higher ISO, why not?
 

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