ND110 or ND106?


Nov 10, 2010
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#1
Hi guys, first time doing daytime long exposures, so Im considering getting a B+W ND filter. (B+W is good enough yeah?) But the problem is I need 52mm for my lens, and there are really few 52mm ones around.

Found this seller : http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/showthread.php?t=560487
Probably going to get it from him, seems pretty reliable, do advice if i should get it from him, not sure if those prices are good enough.

But I cant decide if i should get the ND110 or Nd106, so do advice me if the 6 stop or 10 stop is better, because all i know is that i need a longer exposure time with the ND110, less exposure time on the ND106. So.. in the end i'll still get the shot right?

yes thanks in advance. all comments are appreciated.
 

NikF601

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Jul 26, 2010
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#4
10 stops .. you need long exposure if the weather is good.
 

Jul 16, 2010
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#5
of course 10 stop. :) get better water images. and there have been numerous good reviews on nd110.
hi guys just a little add on, if 10 stop is good for water, what is 6 stops good for? any idea?
 

Nov 10, 2010
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#6
I would expect 10 stop to produce some really dark photos. So i'll just increase the exposure abit more to brighten things up? Yeah, im looking at doing outdoor photography involving the sea(water) and sky of course. What's the use of a 6 stop then?
 

chiangkxv

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Jul 5, 2008
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#7
I'll go for 10 stops. :D

Reason - I can always increase exposure either by opening up aperture, longer exposure, increase ISO (not too high of course) or take put the ND filter but i cannot do the same reversely. of course you can shorten the shutter speed, but thats not what we want right, our purpose is to achieve a certain exposure time.

also, i'll say get a step up filter + a 77mm ND110. 77mm is usual biggest filter diameter, of course there are 82mm around, but less common. Thus you can share this filter amoung other lens that you will purchase in the near future. :D Its also easier to sell off a 77mm filter in the 2nd hand market.
 

liveevil

New Member
Jan 10, 2006
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#8
I prefer ND106. 6 stops is good enough for most situation.

Here are 2 photos I have taken using the ND106:
photo 1
photo 2

But of cos, If I need to do a long exposure in broad day light (for cloud movement or smooth water surface) then maybe I would need a ND110. I suggest you buy the 77mm filter so that you do not need to sell your filter every time you buy a new lens with a different thread size. ;)
 

Jan 27, 2010
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#10
I'll go for 10 stops. :D

Reason - I can always increase exposure either by opening up aperture, longer exposure, increase ISO (not too high of course) or take put the ND filter but i cannot do the same reversely. of course you can shorten the shutter speed, but thats not what we want right, our purpose is to achieve a certain exposure time.

also, i'll say get a step up filter + a 77mm ND110. 77mm is usual biggest filter diameter, of course there are 82mm around, but less common. Thus you can share this filter amoung other lens that you will purchase in the near future. :D Its also easier to sell off a 77mm filter in the 2nd hand market.
To your last sentence, i would say it can go either way. Precisely because there are many 77mm filters and lenses in the BnS market, you will be competing with others to sell away the filter. But for the 52mm, being a more rarely sold/used filter size, you'll end up being the only seller on the BnS market, and able to sell the filter more easily.

But chiangkxv does make sense too, since the lenses that you might be upgrading to in the future have mostly 77mm filter size, and would be interchangable with your future upgraded lenses :D
 

catchlights

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Sep 27, 2004
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#11
the question is like you are asking people, "should I eat 3 bowls of rice or 6 bowls?" that nobody can really give you the answer, that depends on how big is your stomach and how hungry you are.

so 6 stops or 10 stops of ND filter, that depends on the lighting situation and the effect you want.
 

chiangkxv

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Jul 5, 2008
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#12
To your last sentence, i would say it can go either way. Precisely because there are many 77mm filters and lenses in the BnS market, you will be competing with others to sell away the filter. But for the 52mm, being a more rarely sold/used filter size, you'll end up being the only seller on the BnS market, and able to sell the filter more easily.

But chiangkxv does make sense too, since the lenses that you might be upgrading to in the future have mostly 77mm filter size, and would be interchangable with your future upgraded lenses :D
yes it could go either way. :) but my concern is that there are not many lens having a 52mm filter thread. many are 55mm and above. :dunno:
 

Nov 10, 2010
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#13
Thanks for the comments guys. I have 3 lenses right now, I dont think i'll need anymore soon. They have been serving me well, all three are 52mm.

But if I'm getting only ONE filter, which one would you reccommend?
 

chiangkxv

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#14
Thanks for the comments guys. I have 3 lenses right now, I dont think i'll need anymore soon. They have been serving me well, all three are 52mm.

But if I'm getting only ONE filter, which one would you reccommend?
In that case, that depend on your usage seriously. What lighting condition do you shoot in, shutter speed you required?
 

Nov 10, 2010
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#15
In that case, that depend on your usage seriously. What lighting condition do you shoot in, shutter speed you required?
basically long exposures in broad daylight outdoors by the sea or something like that. maybe some sunrise and sunset shots too. quite a fair bit of sunlight

as for shutter speed, bulb definitely. as long as needed for seas and clouds to look smooth and nice
 

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chiangkxv

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#16
basically long exposures in broad daylight outdoors by the sea or something like that. maybe some sunrise and sunset shots too. quite a fair bit of sunlight

as for shutter speed, bulb definitely. as long as needed for seas and clouds to look smooth and nice
During strong lighting and 1 min exposure, you will need a 10 stop definitely.

I have a few shots in day light with 1 min exposure, f/22, ISO 100 with an ND110.
 

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