ND filters


Mar 16, 2009
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#1
Hey bros. yet another question. im into landscape photography and im actually loooking forward to take those milky water shots. Heard that u need ND filters for those effect. Wld like to know what ND is most frequently used? ND4? ND8?
 

Linnl71

New Member
Jul 2, 2009
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East area
#2
Stronger sunlight or you want even longer exposure use ND8 or more?

Not so long exposure / not so strong sunlight use ND 4 or less?

I think it really depends on the situation & your liking.
 

kietgnoel

New Member
Dec 24, 2004
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Planet Earth
#3
Hey bros. yet another question. im into landscape photography and im actually loooking forward to take those milky water shots. Heard that u need ND filters for those effect. Wld like to know what ND is most frequently used? ND4? ND8?
You don't get that effect from using a ND filter. Rather you get it from using a low shutter speed e.g. 1/10 sec. However, if the scene is too bright (e.g. bright sun), you may not achieve that kind of low shutter speed.

This is where a ND filter comes in. It cuts down the amount of light reaching your camera sensor so that you can use a lower shutter speed.
 

shierwin

Senior Member
Dec 29, 2008
3,428
8
38
East Coast
#4
Need to reduce the shutter speed. To do that you must use a tripod.
Select aperture priority, lowest iso possible. Then add the required 1-8 stops ND filters and where necessary the CPL filter.
 

catchlights

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 27, 2004
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Punggol, Singapore
www.foto-u.com
#5
Hey bros. yet another question. im into landscape photography and im actually loooking forward to take those milky water shots. Heard that u need ND filters for those effect. Wld like to know what ND is most frequently used? ND4? ND8?
let say you found a small waterfall at a nearby park, you want to get a silky water effect, to get such effect, you need the shutter to be a few seconds at least,

you take a meter reading, meter suggest the exposure to be ISO 200, f8, 1/125sec for this scene.

let say the water is moving very fast, 8 sec is good enough, to lower the shutter speed to 8 sec from 1/125...
1/60 - 1/30- 1/15 - 1/8 - 1/4 -1/2 - 1s -2s - 4s - 8s, you need to cut down total 10 stops,

ND4 (2 stops) or ND8 (3 stops) is not enough. you need a ND400 (9 stops) at least.
 

Mar 16, 2009
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#6
ohh. alright. thanks for the advice. i understand that people do stacking of filters. how is that done? u cant just simply stack the filters right?
 

Sep 28, 2008
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#7
yes you need a filter.
and most of the time nd 8 is not enough...
i tried stacking nd4+nd8 also not enough..

nd110 (10 stops) from B+W does the trick though.

and no no to A mode in shooting such sense. your camera cant sense that amount of light.
you can use A mode without the filter to get the time need from your camera, then switch to manual keeping the same aperture, the shutter time x10.
 

Mar 16, 2009
281
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#8
yes you need a filter.
and most of the time nd 8 is not enough...
i tried stacking nd4+nd8 also not enough..

nd110 (10 stops) from B+W does the trick though.

and no no to A mode in shooting such sense. your camera cant sense that amount of light.
you can use A mode without the filter to get the time need from your camera, then switch to manual keeping the same aperture, the shutter time x10.
ohhh okok thanks for the input. that really helped me understand how to use the ND filters. at least i wont go using the A mode. lol

the nd110 must cost a bomb yea?
 

Jan 27, 2009
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www.flickr.com/hetfieldpaul
#9
Usually people start with Circular Polariser (CPL) first as it helps to increase contrast in the day and also acts as a 2.5 stop ND filter. If that is not sufficient, you can then purchase other ND.

Do note that ND are not any special filters but a dark piece of glass that reduce the light into the camera. This can help to 'create' motion at time...such as making water fall silky smooth etc. It depends on the light available for your camera and the kind of effect you wish to acheive, so there is no perfect ND.
 

Mar 16, 2009
281
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0
#10
Usually people start with Circular Polariser (CPL) first as it helps to increase contrast in the day and also acts as a 2.5 stop ND filter. If that is not sufficient, you can then purchase other ND.

Do note that ND are not any special filters but a dark piece of glass that reduce the light into the camera. This can help to 'create' motion at time...such as making water fall silky smooth etc. It depends on the light available for your camera and the kind of effect you wish to acheive, so there is no perfect ND.
Yes i do understand that. Thanks for your input too! =)
 

Aug 8, 2008
605
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Singapore
#11
Landscape photographers usually have a few ND filters of different "densities". It all depends on the scene and how much you want to stop down to. So don't be surprised if you may not get the right effect on a scene with one particular filter.

People stack filters to achieve even slower shutter speed. Of course, the more elements you add, the more "impurities" you will get, so use this method with care.

It sure takes lotsa trial and error...using M mode is thus necessary to experiment with different shutter speeds.

Good luck!
 

night86mare

Deregistered
Aug 25, 2006
25,541
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www.pbase.com
#12
ohh. alright. thanks for the advice. i understand that people do stacking of filters. how is that done? u cant just simply stack the filters right?
you can, but more filters = more chance of flare.

more filters = more chance of funny color cast

more filters = more chance of dirty filter = more chance of soft image
 

Jul 5, 2007
1,199
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AMK
#14
If you are paying to $100, then you might want to consider LCW fader ND. That way you can have a whole range of ND in a single filter. IMO

ohhh okok thanks for the input. that really helped me understand how to use the ND filters. at least i wont go using the A mode. lol

the nd110 must cost a bomb yea?