My JBP pic failed, will go back again tomorrow!


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tomshen

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Sorry to say so but most of my shots turned out blur due to large aperture setting. I thought large apeture makes subject stand out but didn't realize it also caused it blur. Will try to improve. BTW, Simon, thx for yr advice!

So waiting for my bird shots;p
 

rty

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Hey Tomshen, no worry. My failure rate is terrible as well. Look what I did to our good Bluestrike. His face was totally blown off.



Ouch!
 

tomshen

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haha, birds are too fast to catch!
 

Falcon

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I like your spirit about going back again. keep it up. I look forward to your shots.
 

tomshen

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Originally posted by Falcon
I like your spirit about going back again. keep it up. I look forward to your shots.
thx, now I treat it as one more research. Fun of life:D
 

YSLee

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Oh good, I may want to go. What time you going?
 

tomshen

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Not sure but in the morning. Quite tired now. Check yr PM later I will leave u my contact so u can call me around 9am.
 

tomshen

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Originally posted by rty
Look what I did to our good Bluestrike. His face was totally blown off.
Ouch!
Faint*&^%$#@!~
 

Flare

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Originally posted by rty
Hey Tomshen, no worry. My failure rate is terrible as well. Look what I did to our good Bluestrike. His face was totally blown off.



Ouch!
With that slave flash there...er... no wonder lah...

But I like the way the word suncatcher is there.... BS's face is a great sun catcher! look at how it cat the light from that flash!
 

mpenza

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Originally posted by Flare


With that slave flash there...er... no wonder lah...

But I like the way the word suncatcher is there.... BS's face is a great sun catcher! look at how it cat the light from that flash!
He's the "Sun god"! ;p
 

Red Dawn

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Originally posted by tomshen
Sorry to say so but most of my shots turned out blur due to large aperture setting. I thought large apeture makes subject stand out but didn't realize it also caused it blur. Will try to improve. BTW, Simon, thx for yr advice!
So waiting for my bird shots;p
wait wait...hold on there.....

wat do u mean by "blur"?

how do u think using large apertures makes your pictures "blur"?
wat are the effects of using large apertures? where do u think the blur comes from?

just wanna make sure u get the concepts right......
 

Goose

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Originally posted by Bluestrike

BEWARE.......
I'll Make you all Burn......
Hey, did u see any 'stars' after that shot??? :bsmilie:
 

tomshen

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Originally posted by Red Dawn

wat do u mean by "blur"?

how do u think using large apertures makes your pictures "blur"?
wat are the effects of using large apertures? where do u think the blur comes from?
Red Dawn, this is to answer yr q. I used large aperture so DOF is too shallow to make the entire subject look sharp, a effect of long focal length + large aperture. And one more problems is that I didn't use M mode for flashing shots, so the backgrounds of some pic are quite distractive. Any comments?
 

Jed

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That's the whole thing... when I first read it a minute ago I thought the same thing as Red Dawn, something doesn't sound quite right.

A large aperture means a correspondingly fast shutter speed, which means your pictures have more chance of being sharp as compared to using a small aperture.

So you are either describing motion blur on the part of the birds or from handholding, in which case your aperture setting is not to blame at all; or blur from insufficient DOF.

Generally with wildlife shots you strive to shoot with as large an aperture as possible, and make sure the eye is in focus, and it is acceptable if the rest of the creature goes slightly out of focus due to limited DOF, unless of course the object of the shot is an illustrative natural history shot.
 

tomshen

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I found it hard to get sharp pix when wide open this time. My problem is probably because:

1. I am relatively too close to my subjects so DOF is very small;
2. Smaller birds are much more agile than other larger animals. Actually motion blur was also one of the reasons. Maybe I should push ISO to 400 or higher sometimes;
3. I am a newbie in wide life photography. To be honest, it's more difficult than other types of shooting, especially when light condition is not very good (like this time). Try to shoot humingbird/eagle and I find my camera useless;p

Anyway the DC is a good tool to learn: read the EXIF, view pix, think and return to practise again. Some day, I will show u all my good ones:D
 

tomshen

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If light condition is poor or under artificial lumination, no flash = fail. At least for Canon users, this brings up the 'theory' of flashing. Quite interesting anyway.
 

Jed

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Originally posted by tomshen
1. I am relatively too close to my subjects so DOF is very small;
You should be alright, the rig you're shooting with gives you an effective DOF of a 400mm lens (35mm terms) at f5.6. That's ample DOF to work with, and I don't know of anyone who works with a wider DOF than that.

Make sure you don't fall into the AF trap. Always shoot wildlife with manual focus, and make sure you visually focus on the eye. Placing the AF sensor on the belly of an animal at the centre of the frame and hoping DOF carries to the head doesn't cut it. I was shooting a small bird out my window this afternoon at about 10 yards out, with a longer lens and a wider aperture than you were using, with the DOF at about an inch. About 90% of the shots were perfectly useable. I was focusing manually.

2. Smaller birds are much more agile than other larger animals. Actually motion blur was also one of the reasons. Maybe I should push ISO to 400 or higher sometimes;
In the interim time, yes, going to 400 is a very good idea, even higher. I'm assuming the D60 can be set in 1/3 ISO stops, well use that and maximise your shutter speed/ISO tradeoff at any given point in time. ISO 400 from what I've seen is a very useable proposition with the D60.

Ideally you'll have nice fast glass. Which is why people have been able to shoot wildlife since time immemorial with ISO 100 and ISO 50 stock, possibly in certain lower light conditions than those you are facing.

Anyway the DC is a good tool to learn: read the EXIF, view pix, think and return to practise again. Some day, I will show u all my good ones:D
Yup, good luck in your quest. When I first started out I too used to think recording shooting information (pen and paper in those days, and I'm not even that old!) would be a brilliant learning tool. I think with the benefit of hindsight and experience I now don't think this to be the case; in my opinion, just looking at your pictures and learning to identify where you went wrong will send you on that learning journey faster. As in, instead of slavishly looking at your shutter speed from your EXIF info, consulting a book and realising your shutter speed was too slow/fast, to be able to look straight to your resultant shot, identify the key elements of a shot that has been taken with a too slow/fast shutter speed, identifying that on the fly, and learning from there. But you're on the right road, shoot more and you'll get there.

Good shooting!
 

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